All Articles Tagged "michelle obama"

Give Us Fitness Life! Michelle Obama Takes Us To The Gym To Celebrate Five Years Of Let’s Move!

May 20th, 2015 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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If you’re one of those people who always wanted to know how Michelle Obama, 51, gets those toned and taut arms and stays so slim and trim, look no further than her new workout video, which shows the First Lady training dirty at the gym.

It all started when President Obama put out a video last week of the five ways he tries to stay in shape while on the go. He put this together to celebrate five years of Michelle’s well-known Let’s Move! campaign. In his video, he challenged the First Lady to show him, and the world, five ways she moves in an effort to stay healthy. So she did!

In her video, we received access to the White House athletic unit where her trainer, Cornell McClellan, showed us the moves that keep her in shape: jumping rope, ab work (including with a medicine ball), explosive in n’ out plyo squats using a bench, lifting free weights, and boxing/kickboxing with a punching bag.

And as Michelle reminds us, if you’re going to take part in these exercises, you can’t forget to stay hydrated!

Check out the First Lady’s workout regimen and get inspired! Summer unofficially starts next week, but it’s never too late to get it right and keep it tight…

Sorry, Michelle. But The “Sting” Of Racism Did Change You

May 12th, 2015 - By Charing Ball
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Source: AP Images

Black people, particularly the adults, have to start telling the truth about racism in America, and that includes the first family.

What I mean is that during an address before the graduating class of Tuskegee University, First Lady Michelle Obama referred to racism as a “sting” and said that she refused to let it hold her back.

As reported by ABC

“Over the years, folks have used plenty of interesting words to describe me. One said I exhibited a little bit of ‘uppityism,'” the first lady said. “Cable news charmingly referred to me as ‘Obama’s baby mamma.’

“All of the chatter, the name-calling, the doubting, all of it was just noise,” she said. “It did not define me, it didn’t change who I was, and most importantly, it couldn’t hold me back.”

Conjuring up the incidents in Ferguson and Baltimore, Obama told graduates, “Here’s the thing, the road ahead is not going to be easy. It never is, especially for folks like you and me.”

You can read the first lady’s entire speech on the White House website. During her address to the graduating class, she also revisited the familiar story of the Tuskegee Airmen, in particular, the challenges faced by Black soldiers who were assumed to be “childlike,” “shiftless” and have smaller brains than their white counterparts.

She then went on to talk about all the racism that she and her husband have endured both out on the campaign trail and during their time in the White House. This includes being labeled as an emasculating “angry Black woman” by many in the media and the time she was parodied on the cover of the New Yorker with a huge afro and machine gun after giving her husband ‘dap.’ As she noted in her speech:

“And at the end of the day, by staying true to the me I’ve always known, I found that this journey has been incredibly freeing.  Because no matter what happened, I had the peace of mind of knowing that all of the chatter, the name calling, the doubting — all of it was just noise.  (Applause.)  It did not define me.  It didn’t change who I was.  And most importantly, it couldn’t hold me back.  I have learned that as long as I hold fast to my beliefs and values — and follow my own moral compass — then the only expectations I need to live up to are my own.”

The speech in front of Tuskegee’s graduating class was beautiful, passionate and probably the most sincere either of the Obamas have been about race since President Obama took office. However, it is not entirely honest. In spite of her declaration, it is clear that the “sting” of racism has in fact defined Mrs. Obama and the Obamas in general. Moreover, anyone with an astute political eye can see that it not only changed how she carried herself in the White House, but in many instances, it held both of them back from enacting the change and reform that they had envisioned themselves doing while on the campaign trail.

It would be her brave and truthful comments about being proud of her country “for the first time,” made during the 2008 Democratic National Convention, that would lead to the future FLOTUS being labeled by many in the mainstream press as an “angry Black woman.” While undeserving, it was a reputation that would haunt the first lady during her first couple of years in the White House. It also didn’t help that a book, written by New York Times reporter Jodi Kantor, followed the theme of an emasculating First Lady by claiming that Michelle was overbearing and frequently clashed with White House staff, particularly Obama’s chief of staff at the time Rahm Emmanuel.

Then there was the less than warm reception she received over her Let’s Move! campaign. If you recall, while Michelle Obama was focused on trying to get legislation passed that would reduce the caloric intake of public school lunches, Republicans were accusing her of overstepping her boundaries. They even made racist remarks about her body shape, in particular, her derriere. Most memorable were the sentiments of a Wisconsin Republican, who criticized Mrs. Obama’s campaign by saying,“She lectures us on eating right while she has a large posterior herself.”

While Michelle Obama has always denied the White House drama and denounced her reputation as an angry Black woman (and rightfully ignored the disgusting sexist comments about her body shape), it was clear that each incident would provoke a noticeable change in Michelle’s overall public image. As noted by this 2008 article in the New York Times entitled, “After Attacks, Michelle Obama Looks for a New Introduction,” the Michelle Obama we witnessed on the campaign trail suddenly became less political. In particular, they noted “Mrs. Obama has already had to check her brutally honest approach to talking about race. Now she co-stars in a campaign that would as soon mute most discussion of race.”

And after the book release, which painted Michelle in a less than admirable light, she enlisted the assistance of a new advisor named Kristina Schake. She helped to redefine Michelle’s public image from the angry black lady into, as the UK’s Daily Mail reported earlier this year, an “all-American ‘everywoman’ who shops at retail outlets, does ‘mom dancing’ and even has a Twitter account.”

Likewise, as the National Journal had previously reported, “While President Obama was steadily losing favor over the last four years, his wife was undergoing a successful public makeover. In keeping with tradition, the first lady has mostly steered clear of politics to focus on feel-good projects such as outreach to military families, organic gardening, and efforts to fight childhood obesity.”

Michelle’s political neutralization did not just stop at talking about race. Her beloved Let’s Move! campaign stopped pushing for actual legislation changes, which would make healthier food more accessible, and instead took a softer approach by focusing on personal nutrition and fitness.

Whether she is willing to admit it to herself or not, it is obvious that the “sting” of racism would be the number one driving force behind Michelle Obama’s shift in her public image.

Now I am sure that Mrs. Obama meant well and thought her words to be inspiring. However, we need to stop preaching to the kids about the world we want to live in and instead, tell them the truth about the world we actually live in. Racism is not a “sting.” It is not the manifestation of sticks and stones and how ugly names cannot hurt us. Racism is systematic and continues in order to ensure that groups outside of the dominant culture, particularly African Americans, can not rise to the same level of equality, justice and freedom as our white counterparts.

And no matter how much personal wealth and status one can acquire within the confines of this system or how many of us become doctors, nurses, lawyers and even presidents of the United States, we are still going to be treated and regarded as inferior. And if the neutralization of Michelle Obama is not enough proof of that then consider how Barack, her husband, has been politically neutered because of his race, including constantly being maligned and undermined in the halls of Congress and not being able to speak and act freely on the issue of police brutality, possibly out of fear of what the dominant culture will say and do to him.

But by not telling the next generation of us the truth about this country, we are ultimately saying to our youth that their places, as second-class citizens in their own land of birth, is okay. That they should accept their positions and work within the parameters set by the majority. Frankly, this is the wrong mindset to have. That kind of mindset breeds complacency when what we actually need are changemakers.


Michelle Obama Discusses Challenges Of Being The First African American First Lady

May 11th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Source: AP Images

Surely, you’ve noticed that this Mother’s Day weekend, there were quite a few graduation ceremonies taking place across the country. Tuskegee University also had their commencement this weekend and First Lady, Michelle Obama was the speaker. She had some really poignant words to share with the graduates about her own successes and failures, and spoke very candidly about the challenges she faced being the first Black woman to hold the position of First Lady and how she overcame them.

She begins the speech talking about the illustrious history of the university and the graduates who made a difference in the world. She mentioned the Tuskegee airmen who took the bumps and bruises of racism to fly into the sky, free.

She said that the graduates today, looking back at that history, might be feeling some pressure to live up to that legacy. And she spoke about the ways in which she too had felt pressure as the First Lady of the United States.

And believe me, I understand that kind of pressure.  (Applause.)  I’ve experienced a little bit of it myself.  You see, graduates, I didn’t start out as the fully-formed First Lady who stands before you today.  No, no, I had my share of bumps along the way.

Back when my husband first started campaigning for President, folks had all sorts of questions of me:  What kind of First Lady would I be?  What kinds of issues would I take on?  Would I be more like Laura Bush, or Hillary Clinton, or Nancy Reagan?  And the truth is, those same questions would have been posed to any candidate’s spouse.  That’s just the way the process works.  But, as potentially the first African American First Lady, I was also the focus of another set of questions and speculations; conversations sometimes rooted in the fears and misperceptions of others.  Was I too loud, or too angry, or too emasculating?  (Applause.) Or was I too soft, too much of a mom, not enough of a career woman? 

Then there was the first time I was on a magazine cover — it was a cartoon drawing of me with a huge afro and machine gun. Now, yeah, it was satire, but if I’m really being honest, it knocked me back a bit.  It made me wonder, just how are people seeing me.

Or you might remember the on-stage celebratory fist bump between me and my husband after a primary win that was referred to as a “terrorist fist jab.”  And over the years, folks have used plenty of interesting words to describe me.  One said I exhibited “a little bit of uppity-ism.“  Another noted that I was one of my husband’s “cronies of color.”  Cable news once charmingly referred to me as “Obama’s Baby Mama.”

And of course, Barack has endured his fair share of insults and slights.  Even today, there are still folks questioning his citizenship. 

And all of this used to really get to me.  Back in those days, I had a lot of sleepless nights, worrying about what people thought of me, wondering if I might be hurting my husband’s chances of winning his election, fearing how my girls would feel if they found out what some people were saying about their mom.

But eventually, I realized that if I wanted to keep my sanity and not let others define me, there was only one thing I could do, and that was to have faith in God’s plan for me.  (Applause.)  I had to ignore all of the noise and be true to myself — and the rest would work itself out.  (Applause.)   

So throughout this journey, I have learned to block everything out and focus on my truth.  I had to answer some basic questions for myself:  Who am I?  No, really, who am I?  What do I care about? 

And the answers to those questions have resulted in the woman who stands before you today.  (Applause.)  A woman who is, first and foremost, a mom.  (Applause.)  Look, I love our daughters more than anything in the world, more than life itself. And while that may not be the first thing that some folks want to hear from an Ivy-league educated lawyer, it is truly who I am.  (Applause.)  So for me, being Mom-in-Chief is, and always will be, job number one. 

Next, I’ve always felt a deep sense of obligation to make the biggest impact possible with this incredible platform.  So I took on issues that were personal to me — issues like helping families raise healthier kids, honoring the incredible military families I’d met on the campaign trail, inspiring our young people to value their education and finish college.  (Applause.) 

Now, some folks criticized my choices for not being bold enough.  But these were my choices, my issues.  And I decided to tackle them in the way that felt most authentic to me — in a way that was both substantive and strategic, but also fun and, hopefully, inspiring. 

So I immersed myself in the policy details.  I worked with Congress on legislation, gave speeches to CEOs, military generals and Hollywood executives.  But I also worked to ensure that my efforts would resonate with kids and families — and that meant doing things in a creative and unconventional way.  So, yeah, I planted a garden, and hula-hooped on the White House Lawn with kids.  I did some Mom Dancing on TV.  I celebrated military kids with Kermit the Frog.  I asked folks across the country to wear their alma mater’s T-shirts for College Signing Day. 

And at the end of the day, by staying true to the me I’ve always known, I found that this journey has been incredibly freeing.  Because no matter what happened, I had the peace of mind of knowing that all of the chatter, the name calling, the doubting — all of it was just noise.  (Applause.)  It did not define me.  It didn’t change who I was.  And most importantly, it couldn’t hold me back.  I have learned that as long as I hold fast to my beliefs and values — and follow my own moral compass — then the only expectations I need to live up to are my own. 

So, graduates, that’s what I want for all of you.  I want you all to stay true to the most real, most sincere, most authentic parts of yourselves.  I want you to ask those basic questions:  Who do you want to be?  What inspires you?  How do you want to give back?  And then I want you to take a deep breath and trust yourselves to chart your own course and make your mark on the world. 

You can read the full speech from Mrs. Obama, transcribed for the White House, on the next page.

“Southside With You” The Obamas’ First Date Is Being Made Into A Movie

May 7th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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The Obamas' First Date Is Being Made Into A Movie

If you’ve read President Obama’s autobiography, or seen of he and Michelle’s television appearances, especially around the time of his reelection campaign, you know about the First Couple’s first kiss.

In case you’ve somehow missed the story, he told O Magazine in 2007:

“On our first date, I treated her to the finest ice cream Baskin-Robbins had to offer, our dinner table doubling as the curb. I kissed her, and it tasted like chocolate.”

Is it just me, or was there a little double entendre there?

Either way, the story has become so popular and so sentimental, that there was plaque placed at the spot where the two shared their first kiss.

And now, according to Variety, the couple’s first date will be turned into a romance drama. The film, called Southside with You, will star Parker Sawyers as a young Barack and Tika Sumpter as Michelle Obama, then Robinson.

Ice cream wasn’t the only part of their date, the soon-to-be couple also visited the Art Institute of Chicago, took a walk and then saw Spike Lee’s Do The Right Thing. 

They made a whole day of it.

Sawyers recently completed a role in Snowden and is about to shoot The Autopsy of Jane Doe.

Richard Tanne will serve as screenwriter and director for the project. Glendon Palmer, who executive produced for Jumping The Broom, will also do so on this project with Tracey Bing, among others.

Shooting for the film is set to start in August.

You can watch Barack and Michelle Obama talk about their first date in this video below. It’s pretty adorable.

Black Don’t Crack: Little Girl Tells Mrs. Obama “You’re Too Young For 51”

April 23rd, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Little Girl Tells Mrs. Obama "You're Too Young For 51"

Source: YouTube/The White House

The babies know what’s up; and quite often, they won’t hesitate to tell you the God’s honest truth.

Yesterday, the First Lady hosted a group of foster children and other youth from Washington D.C. in their annual event, “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.” Later, Mrs. Obama allowed the children to ask her questions. The 32-minute session covered a wide range of topics; but one brave and curious little girl dared to ask the First Lady of the United States, a question some women avoid like the plague.

“How old are you?”

The First Lady looked a bit taken aback for a second before answering, “I’m 51.”

The little girl must have made some type of face expressing shock because Mrs. Obama asked her what was that look about.

And that’s when the little girl said, “You’re too young for a 51-year-old.”

Tell the truth, child!

Mrs. Obama asked her staff to give the little girl a microphone to repeat her observation. Afterward, she said that deserved a hug.

And this child was ready for her hug, she ran up to the stage, arms extended long before she even got there.

Simply, adorable.

Check it out in the video below.

Crazy Star Quotes About Obama

April 13th, 2015 - By Rich
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We’re shaking our collective heads over these outlandish quotes on President Obama.After Azealia Banks had her moment, we realized a lot of other celebrities have also made some pretty crazy comments about our president.

All images courtesy of WENN

Sources: HuffPo

Ctazy Star Quotes About Obama

BGR Founder Beverly Bond Responds Mad White Folks About The First Lady Attending Black Girls Rock Awards

April 10th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Beverly Bond Responds Mad White Folks About The First Lady Attending Black Girls Rock

Source: WBLS

After BET aired the “Black Girls Rock” Award show, a slew of White people were not particularly happy about First Lady, Michelle Obama appearing and speaking at the program. And they expressed their concerns, mostly via social media. They sounded off under the First Lady’s Instagram page.

This happens every year with the award show, the criticism was just louder this year because of Mrs. Obama’s attendance. Well, Black Girls Rock founder, Beverly Bond, has been doing this for years. And just like last year, she had to address the critics. This year was no exception. In a recent interview with WBLS, see how she eloquently and righteously defended the First Lady’s decision to attend the show as well as the reason it exists in the first place.

About Mrs. Obama attending: 

“I thought she’s a Black girl that rocks. Why wouldn’t she be there?” 

About people saying the show is racist. 

“There is a real blind spot when it comes to privilege in America and not understanding racism and the implications of that. It is very telling when people have no problem tuning into Black Entertainment Television but when they’re tuning in, they’re offended by Black Entertainment Television celebrating Black women. That says a lot about who’s really racist here. And the fact that there needs to be a Black Entertainment Television or a Black Girls Rock or an NAACP. These things came about because of our exclusion. That’s one of the reasons why they exist. 

So I think it’s very telling about where we are with our race relations with people being comfortable enough to tune into BET, not concerned when the images were not so stellar, never voicing their opinions about things that were degrading us or harming us. And to be offended by something that uplifts and empowers something that is an affirmation for young girls, that’s very telling. 

If people really felt like it was about exclusion or “White Girls Rock Too” then they would have approached it differently. We know White Girls Rock, no one’s ever denied it. But to be offended that we have taken this issue of self esteem in our own hands…the many messages that are directed towards Black women and girls that tell us that we are not good enough, that we are not beautiful enough, that we are not deserving enough. There are so many messages in media from cosmetic ads to just being the leading lady opposite men who look like us. 

And so this message has been going on for a very long time and for us to actually decide to say something and do something about it and people be offended, that’s like telling the slaves not to teach the kids to read. I think it’s really racist of them to be offended. 

But what I did notice this year was women, of all nationalities but especially White women that jumped in and said to the other women who were offended, ‘How dare you? How dare you be offended by our sisters celebrating themselves?’ And I thought that that was amazing.

Bravo Beverly! You can watch Beverly Bond’s full interview, where she discusses a bit of the process to get the First Lady there, to the words of encouragement she shared with her and more in the video below.


FLOTUS Michelle Obama Jokes Daughters Are Not The Influential Ones

April 7th, 2015 - By Rich
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FLOTUS recently sat down with “Live With Kelly and Michael” and commented on the fact Time Magazine listed Sasha, 13, and Malia, 16, as two of the most influential teens of 2014. While famed blogger Luvvie may not be a mother just yet, she hit the nail on the head when explaining why First Lady Michelle Obama stating her two daughters were not influential was so great. From realizing “Everything in this house is mines” to the notion of working for what’s yours, Luvvie gives us a good laugh while also reminding us the importance of making sure our youth work hard for themselves – as FlOTUS points out.

Watch the interview below (comments at 2:24) and check out Luvvie’s comical realness.

Check out what Luvvie had to say:

I’m not a parent yet but I look forward to the day where I can tell my children that what’s mine is NOT theirs. First Lady Michelle Obama was told that Malia and Sasha were chosen by Time Magazine as two of the most influential teens and she did the Mommy-est thing she could. She disagreed.

“They are not influential. They just live here. They have done nothing to gain any influence.” I LOVE HER. She is such a Black mama because she even laughed at the idea. Like psht. She almost said “those jokers? Nah.”

You haven’t been insulted til your parents bring you back down to life in such a way.

My children will be told they have nothing but their good name. ALL THE SHOES AND ELECTRONICS ARE MINE because I bought them. They better not slam their bedroom door. IT IS MY DOOR AND YOU SLAM IT, YOU LOSE IT. All my petty will come out quick! This is the parenting I believe in.

Don’t mind me, though. I was raised by Nigerian parents who felt NO QUALMS about telling me when I was being an IJOT (idiot). Chile, Naija moms will cut you down to size so tough that when you get to school, you’re rubber and everyone is glue. We can shake things off way easier.

It’s also clear that The Obamas do not subscribe to that over-affirming form of parenting (thankfully). You know the parents who tell their kids they’re special snowflakes all the time in spite of what foolishness they engage in? NAH, B! I ain’t for that. Some parents will “OMG YOU’RE THE BEST THING EVER” their kids to spoiled glory. I’m not for that. At all.

If you do something ridiculous, you will be told. And then LATER, I’ll be all “but you’re smarter than that.” SIT in your mistake, doe. I’m not here for the “everyone gets a participation trophy” parenting manual. Nope. You didn’t win. That’s ok. Try harder next time. You will lose like a champ and deal. NO TROPHY for just playing. NAH.

Get better at what you wanna be awarded for, kid. Children need to be taught to expect to win but know how to lose.

But yes: “They have done nothing.” LOVE.


 MommyNoire, do you agree with FLOTUS’ statement?

They’ve Done Nothing: Michelle Obama Keeps It Real About Sasha And Malia Being Voted ‘Most Influential Teens’

April 6th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Michelle Obama Keeps It Real About Sasha And Malia

Source: ABC

People are always asking President Obama and our First Lady, Michelle Obama how they manage to keep themselves and their children down to earth. Well, basically all you need is a mother to keep it real. Mrs. Obama has that in her mother Marian Robinson, who lives with the family, in the White House, and Malia and Sasha have that with their mother, who keeps it real, even when she’s doing press tours.

Recently, when the First Lady sat down for an appearance on “Live! With Kelly and Michael” they asked her about Sasha and Malia appearance on Time magazine’s “Most influential teens of 2014” list . While Mrs. Obama could have said some nice, fluffy words and pretended to be honored by the distinction, she dismissed the title as a bit ridiculous.

“Yeah, I don’t know why–they’re not influential; they just live here. They have done nothing to gain any influence.” 

In fact Mrs. Obama says she doesn’t even think the daughters have even heard about the article.

“I don’t even think that they realize that they’re influential. I don’t think anybody showed them that article, so don’t mention it!” 

Basically, the article said these two were influential because Malia’s appearance at Coachella was more talked about than some of the concert acts and Sasha’s unicorn sweater sold out with a quickness on Asos. So yeah, while they do have some pop cultural pull, Auntie Chelle is generally right, they haven’t done anything yet. They still have plenty of time though.

The recipe to staying humble? A Black mama who keeps it real. You can watch Mrs. Obama’s full interview in the video below.

12 Quotes from #BlackGirlsRock that Gave Us Our Entire Lives

April 6th, 2015 - By Rich
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We love it when BET airs Beverly Bond’s annual Black Girls Rock celebration, for so many reasons. All of that beautiful, Black girl magic in the same room, slaying at the same time? Swoon! But even if BGR didn’t have the red carpet or the wardrobe changes or the dope hair, we’d still watch for the speeches.

Every year, the Black Girls Rock award show manages to outdo itself with the caliber of the celebrants, the speakers, and the performers. Sometimes we forget how much we need to be addressed directly, as Black women. BGR makes us visible to ourselves and to the world.

It means everything in the world for another magnificent Black woman to say, “Sis, I see you.” We draw inspiration and strength from these words.  So many of the speeches spoke to the heart of who Black girls are and who we hope to be, where we came from and where we’re going.

This year, the stage held so many powerful Black women: First Lady Michelle Obama, Cicely Tyson, Jada Pinkett-Smith, Erykah Badu, Dr. Helene D. Gayle, and countless others. Although it was so hard to choose, we picked 12 of our favorite quotes from the award show. BGR is the gift that keeps on giving us life!


12 Quotes from #BlackGirlsRock that Gave Us Our Entire Lives