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Image Source: Shutterstock Dolce & Gabbana are the latest pair of fashion moguls to find themselves on the wrong side of their customer base. But they’re not the only ones. These boycotted designers made their clientele so mad, that they’ve found a permanent spot on their “what not to wear” lists.

Image Source: WENN

Dolce & Gabbana

Fashion moguls and one-time couple Dolce & Gabbana, are likely thinking twice about calling babies born via IVF synthetic and the women who have them with “wombs for rent.”

Now, mega-stars like Elton John, Ricky Martin and Ryan Murphy, producer of American Horror Story are calling on all of Hollywood to boycott the label saying,

“It’s so ignorant of Dolce & Gabbana to speak out with such ugly evil — what they said is a not-modern thing to say. This is not just a gay issue. I know 10 women in my life who used IVF to conceive — and three doing it right now…I don’t think they’ll be traipsing off to a Dolce & Gabbana store to buy clothes anytime soon.”

Image Source: WENN

Tommy Hilfiger

Remember when everyone wore Tommy Hilfiger? That is until they heard that Mr. Hilfiger said that he didn’t want black people wearing his clothes.

But Tommy Hilfiger says that those rumors were never true:

We had heard that I was supposedly on “Oprah,” and I had told her that if I had known black people were going to buy my clothes, I wouldn’t have been a designer. I had never been on “Oprah,” and I had never said that. And I would never believe that anyway, nor would I ever say that anyway.”

Image Source: WENN

Louis Vuitton

Not all boycotts work out the way they’re planned. When Louis Vuitton’s head designer refused to meet with Kanye West, Kanye encouraged all of his fans to boycott the label.

But Louis Vuitton countered by e-mailing their highest high-end customers to boycott back. And since Kanye’s ruffled a few feathers along the way, customers so overwhelmingly supported the anti-boycott that LV sales actually soared.

Luckily it looks like Louis Vuitton and Kanye are back on speaking terms.

https://twitter.com/pastamase/status/572935408935432192

Yeezus Tour

A few years later, the tables turned for Kanye when Al Sharpton organized a boycott of his brand for using a confederate flag as part of the design.

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Abercrombie & Fitch

Abercrombie’s CEO Mike Jeffries got his label in a lot of hot water when he said that he only wants “thin and beautiful” people wearing his clothes — that’s why the line refuses to carry anything larger than a size 10 on their racks. Unless of course you’re a man, then they carry up to sixe 2XL to accomodate athletes. They qualify as one of the “cool kids” that Jeffries says his company caters to.

Image Source: WENN

Michael Costello

Designer Michael Costello has been a fan favorite since his days on Project Runway. Since then he’s designed dresses for stars like Tamar Braxton, Gabourey Sidibe, Keri Hilson and Meagan Good — including a 24-piece collection for Beyonce’s On The Run Tour.

But one fan says that Costello got racist when she accused him of stealing a design she sent him and posting it on her page. And the slur was pretty bad:

“Your just probably a dumb n—er defending her. I am royalty b—h! I dressed Beyoncé! Who are they gonna believe!”

Beyonce’s fans immediately flooded her page with requests to boycott MT Costello and even Chrissy Teigen got involved. Since then Michael has said that the Instagram screenshot of his message was a hoax, but not all of his former fans are buying it.

Image Source: WENN

Cristal

Sometimes a boycott is right on point. Cristal found itself on the outs in the super-lucrative world of rapper endorsements when Jay-Z turned his back on the label in 2006.

That’s the year managing director Frederic Rouzaud said that he didn’t like the fact that his label was associated with “rappers” but, “what can we do? We can’t forbid people from buying it. I’m sure Dom Perignon or Krug would be delighted to have their business.”

Jay-Z released this statement, “I view his comments as racist and will no longer support any of his products through any of my various brands including the 40/40 Club nor in my personal life.” and we can’t remember the last time anyone rapped about a bottle of that bubbly since.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Urban Outfitters

Urban Oufitters has been in so many PR scuffles recently, it’s getting hard to keep track. There’ve been concentration camp pajamas, school-shooting sweatshirts, and t-shirts that encourage under-aged drinking.

And just when we were all starting to wonder, “what’s really going on at Urban Outfitters’ design offices?” boutique fashion designers started popping up out of the woodwork claiming Urban Outfitters stole their designs without compensating them.

Image Source: Instagram

#BoycottBlackFriday

As many of us were left reeling from the Ferguson Verdict, organizers at the Urban Cusp created #BoycottBlackFriday to encourage African-Americans — a $1.1 trillion economic force — to boycott Black Friday.

The results? An 11% decrease in sales on the nation’s biggest shopping day.

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GAP

Whatever you do, it’s a bad idea to get on the wrong side of animal lovers. GAP’s company Piperlime was able to sell it’s fur garments for just days before a Change.org petition with 50,000 cropped up. Rather than risk the rage of animal rights activists, GAP quickly pulled the item from Piperlime’s shelves.

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Barney’s

After a string of reports of African-American shoppers being racially profiled by the store, several community leaders called for a boycott of the retailer. But when Jay-Z chose to influence Barney’s politics by making a multi-million dollar deal for his black-owned clothing line, the public face of the boycott slowed down.

Would you shop there?

Image Source: WENN

Any Label That Doesn’t Put Black Models On The Runway

In 2013 there were fewer black models on the runway than ever. And Iman says that if fashion wants to see more minority women on the runway, minority women must take a stand:

“It feels to me like the times need a real hard line drawn like in the Sixties, by saying if you don’t use black models, then we boycott. If you engage the social media, trust me, it will hurt them in their pockets. If you take it out there, they will feel the uproar.

There is something terribly wrong. We have a President and a First Lady who are black. You would think things have changed, and then you realise[sic] that they have not. In fact, things have gone backwards.”

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