MadameNoire Featured Video

Maxine Waters and Megan Thee Stallion

Source: Getty / Getty

There is always so much conversation about who women should be and how they should present themselves in society. And when women step outside of that box, break that mold or deviate from societies predetermined conditions, there is a lot of discussion, judgement and even condemnation.

Women are told that if they behave a certain way they won’t be accepted—first by men and then by society at large.

But that hasn’t been the case for rappers Cardi B. and Megan Thee Stallion. Both women are sexually expressive in their music, costumes and stage performances, yet their authenticity and character have actually made them more sought after, even outside of the music industry.

Both Megan and Cardi have transcended the rap community and are often tapped to discuss sociopolitical issues as well.

In addition to her political commentary, Cardi  has held audience with presidential candidates and even President-elect Joe Biden.

Earlier this year, after she was the victim of a shooting at the hand Tory Lanez, she wrote and produced an op-ed about the lack of protection for Black women in the New York Times. The girls are multifaceted. And powerful, influential people are taking notice.

Yesterday, Meg shared that she received a letter from Congresswoman Maxine Waters and it served as one of the highlights of her year.

In the letter, dated November 12, 2020, Waters wrote:

“Dear Megan,

I read the op-ed you wrote that appeared in the New York Times recently and I can’t thank you enough for bringing much needed attention to the plight of Black women, not just here in the United States—but everywhere. You are so right that Black women have pave the way and have done so by leading with courage and bravery. There is also this notion, which you touched upon, that we as Black women have the ability to bear a heavier burden than everyone else in this society.

That notion contributes to the lack of care and attention to the issues that specifically affect us. While we are too often overlooked, there is no doubt that Black women are a glue for our families and communities, and a crucial part of the fabric of this country. We see that-in your career and your tremendous success, despite the obstacles that have come your way.

I write all this to say that I am so incredibly proud of you and how you have used your voice to uplift Black women. I know that Black women and girls everywhere thank you for the way you so fiercely have their back. I want you to know that I have your back too. I hope that during these trying times you take comfort in knowing that I am fighting for you, and all Black women, every single day. Stay well, keep fighting, and take care. We need your voice in this fight.

Warm regards,

Maxine Waters

Member of Congress”

Love to see it.

There is nothing like generations of Black women connecting over the desire to see us all win. Truly warms my heart.

If you’re familiar with Maxine Waters’ life in public office, you know this is the not the first time she’s lent her voice and her support to a young rapper.

Not only did she call Tupac her favorite rapper in 2017, her defense of his art and rap in general dates back to 1994, when Congress was discussing the impact of “gangsta rap” and whether or not it should be censored.

Los Angeles Times reported Waters’ support of the art form, placing her undeniably on the right side of history when it came to this issue.

“It would be a foolhardy mistake to single out poets as the cause of America’s problems. These are our children and they’ve invented a new art form to describe their pains, fears and frustrations with us as adults. Just because we don’t like the symbols they use or the way they look, we should not allow that to cause us to embark on a course of censorship.”

We’re happy to see that Auntie is still down for the youth dem.

TRENDING ON MADAMENOIRE
Comment Disclaimer: Comments that contain profane or derogatory language, video links or exceed 200 words will require approval by a moderator before appearing in the comment section. XOXO-MN