What To Do If You Or Someone You Know Is A Victim Of Revenge Porn

July 7, 2017  |  

BET Awards 2017 at the Microsoft Theater on June 25, 2017 in Los Angeles, CA
Featuring: Blac Chyna
Where: Los Angeles, California, United States
When: 25 Jun 2017
Credit: Nicky Nelson/WENN.com

Credit: Nicky Nelson/WENN.com

A lot of people had a good laugh — and still are — over the debacle that exploded between Rob Kardashian and Blac Chyna on social media Wednesday. And while it has often been hard to take this pair’s relationship, and the drama that comes with it, seriously, Rob’s posting of naked photos of his ex is very serious.

Revenge porn is the official name for the crime for which Rob could potentially be facing jail time. As we pointed out in our story yesterday:

“Attorneys told the New York Daily News they believe Kardashian violated California’s law enacted in 2013.

“The law describes revenge porn as sharing the image of an ‘intimate body part of another identifiable person, or an image of that person engaged in sexual intercourse, sodomy, oral copulation or masturbation.’

“The person, as Rob did, must intentionally distribute the image though the understanding was that it would be kept private and the person must have done so with the intent to cause emotional distress.”

And though Blac Chyna appears to be unbothered by Rob’s behavior, most victims aren’t so lucky. The National Domestic Violence Hotline notes on their website: “Like all forms of abuse, revenge porn is extremely traumatizing. Unfortunately, legislation has been slow to respond; not all states have enacted laws against revenge porn or recognize it as a crime, leaving victims with little to no legal recourse in some cases. End Revenge Porn, a campaign of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, provides a guide to current state laws as well as a list of additional resources for survivors.”

The Hotline also lists additional tips for preventing revenge porn, victims of this crime, and bystanders who witness this viral form of sexual assault.

Victims

“Different states have specific laws, but no matter where you are, taking some type of legal action is always an option,” the site states on their blog. “Document the content, because it can be used as evidence. Contact the bar association in your state to find an attorney who specializes in Internet privacy and rights. The organization Without My Consent discusses different courses of action.”

  • First and foremost know that you have the right to say no if asked to send sexually explicit images, video, or texts.
  • If you do engage, try to avoid showing any identifying features (face, tattoos, birthmarks, etc) in the pictures you send.
  • If your images are shared without your consent, Google has created a form where revenge porn victims can request that their images be removed from search results. You can access the form here.
  • You can also conduct takedowns yourself using the DIY Program on DMCA.com or their Professional Takedown Service.
  • Contact the authorities, especially if “the perpetrator of this crime is known to you and you never gave permission for the pictures to be shared,” the Digital Millennium Copyright Act notes.

Bystanders:

“Begin to hold yourself and those around you accountable for what’s being said and posted,” the Hotline states. “If you see something, report it.”

  • On Facebook, use the report link that appears near the content to send a message to have it removed.
  • On Twitter, access their various forms for reporting a violation.
  • On YouTube, there is a “Safety Center” for requesting videos to be flagged or removed.
  • You can also offer to help document the abuse by capturing screenshots whenever and wherever images are shared which could be used as evidence if charges are pressed.

If your partner is pressuring you to send explicit pictures or video, or if they are threatening to distribute materials you have shared, you can call The Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 any time or chat via their website from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. Central.

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