All Articles Tagged "nepotism"

Black High School Dropouts Suffer 95 Percent Jobless Rate

July 9th, 2013 - By Kimberly Gedeon
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We all remember our first job — and first paycheck — as teens. Some of waited tables or folded clothes at a department store. While we all share nightmarish customer service stories, teens today cannot even score a job to share their own experiences in the future. Nearly a quarter of today’s teens are jobless; the same unemployment rate for adolescents during the Great Depression, PBS reports.

“It’s really hard, because it’s either ‘we have too many people, we don’t have enough money, our budget’s not right, you’re not experienced enough’…” said Zahquira Thomas, a 20-year-old Black woman still seeking work.

Compared to 2000, high school students are now working 50 percent less than they did 13 years ago. Not surprisingly, the earlier you ditch education, the less bright you future will be. However, there are other impediments to being employed — being a male, African American, and having unemployed parents, PBS notes.

With the help of a little nepotism, middle income teenagers are more likely to find jobs through connections with mom and dad willing to make some calls to get their teen some work.

“You find low-income kids work at the lowest rates by far. When you combine them, take a young black high school drop out low-income male, you’re talking five percent unemployment,” says Andrew Sum, Center for Labor Market Studies in Northeastern University. Poor African-American teens are suffering from a 95 percent jobless rate.

Employers would rather hire older candidates for the job than teens. Adolescents are competing for the same job positions as adults — unfortunately for them, teens usually lose. “Employers are telling us, and showing this in their behavior, that they’d rather hire older workers and young adults than teenagers,” said Sum. “They’ve got choices about whom to hire and teenagers are just […] at the back of that queue.”

Sum has noticed, as well as many other Americans, that the malls and fast food places are seldom filled with teenage workers these days. All the new jobs created in the food and retail industry were given to adult workers and immigrants instead. You might assume that increased American wealth has allowed teenagers to remain at home and study. Sum refutes these claims — American families have not increased in income since 2000. With the exception of CEOs, there has been no movement in U.S. household income for years. “It’s not increased affluence. It’s diminished jobs,” Sum concludes.

This new skewed employment of adults over teens results in negative consequences  adolescents’ lives. “Young kids who don’t work are more likely to engage in criminal behavior,” said Sum. “Young woman who don’t work are more likely to get pregnant. You lose experience [and the] opportunity to get training on the job. Employers look for stable, consistent work experience.”

The best way to predict who will still be living with their parents at 30 is to see what they did in their teens and early 20s, PBS concluded.

Stroger's Brother-in-Law Resigns from County Health Post

September 15th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Chicago Tribune) — The brother-in-law of former Cook County Board President Todd Stroger has resigned from his $195,906-a-year post as chief operating officer at the county’s Department of Public Health.  Stephen Martin’s resignation is effective Sept. 23, according to Amy Poore, a public health spokeswoman.

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D.C. Council Faults Gray for “Nepotism and Cronyism”

August 24th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Washington Post) — A special investigative committee formed by the D.C. Council concluded in a report released Tuesday that “nepotism and cronyism” in the hiring practices of Mayor Vincent C. Gray’s administration violated local and federal law and damaged the city’s reputation. The report, released after a six-month council investigation, portrays Gray (D) as “disconnected” and aloof as he allowed several top aides to control critical personnel decisions in the early days of his administration.  The report also confirms allegations by former mayoral candidate Sulaimon Brown that a top Gray campaign official paid him to disparage then-Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D) during the 2010 primary campaign, although the probe found that Brown exaggerated the amount.

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Gerri Hall's Got City Job Without Interview

May 23rd, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Afro) — In a recent closed executive session with D.C. Council members, the son of Mayor Vincent Gray’s former chief of staff admitted that he handed his resume to his mother for a job and, approximately one month later and without an interview, was offered a city position.  The admission added more validity to hiring missteps which the administration said they made during transition as well as allegations of nepotism which have beset the Gray administration.  Nicholas Hall, the son of former Chief of Staff Gerri Mason Hall, told council members Mary Cheh (D-Ward 3) and David Catania (I-At-Large) that he was given an offer letter with a listed salary of $55,000 to work for the Department of Parks and Recreation. But he said he was never interviewed for the position.  Gerri Hall was fired by Gray on May 17, the first major removal of an administration official amid the growing controversy over the hiring of political appointees.

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In DC New Mayor Stays on the Defense

April 16th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(New York Times) — When Vincent C. Gray campaigned for mayor last fall, he promised to bring character, integrity and leadership back to the District of Columbia.  But 100 days into Mr. Gray’s tenure, he is battling the perception that his administration has brought anything but, mostly because several staff members have been accused of helping their children get jobs in his administration and of receiving inflated salaries.  Mr. Gray’s supporters say that the allegations are overblown, and that salary caps were exceeded by small amounts and involved only a few people. But they nevertheless have cast a harsh light on the city just as it has become a target for Republicans in Congress over abortion and school vouchers.  This is all bad news for a city trying to overcome its past, Mr. Gray’s critics say. They argue that the headlines created by his missteps are reviving bad memories of the 1980s, when the city, under Mayor Marion Barry, bungled its affairs so badly that it was taken over by a federally appointed control board.

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Upset Sulaimon Brown Leaves Hearing as Key Details Emerge in Gray Probe

March 31st, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Afro) — The DC council’s probe into the allegations of cronyism and nepotism in hiring that have stained Mayor Vincent Gray’s administration and caused the firing or resignation of several staff members began with a hearing March 28. But while six witnesses were called to testify before the legislative body, Sulaimon Brown—who made headlines this month when he accused the mayor of participating in a pay-to-play scheme—was not one of them. Brown sat in the audience as soon as the hearing began, and when Councilman Marion Barry of Ward 8 began to speak, Brown stormed out of the room.  “They should call it an obstruction of justice hearing,” Brown said. “All of them are friends…They need to practice what they preach.”  Brown said he was given an invitation to speak to the Committee on Government Operations and the Environment, however, he did not testify. He said he attended the hearing to “listen and see what was going on,” but was upset that Barry spoke as if he was in support of Gray.

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Upset Sulaimon Brown Leaves Hearing as Key Details Emerge in Gray Probe

March 31st, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Afro) — The DC council’s probe into the allegations of cronyism and nepotism in hiring that have stained Mayor Vincent Gray’s administration and caused the firing or resignation of several staff members began with a hearing March 28. But while six witnesses were called to testify before the legislative body, Sulaimon Brown—who made headlines this month when he accused the mayor of participating in a pay-to-play scheme—was not one of them. Brown sat in the audience as soon as the hearing began, and when Councilman Marion Barry of Ward 8 began to speak, Brown stormed out of the room.  “They should call it an obstruction of justice hearing,” Brown said. “All of them are friends…They need to practice what they preach.”  Brown said he was given an invitation to speak to the Committee on Government Operations and the Environment, however, he did not testify. He said he attended the hearing to “listen and see what was going on,” but was upset that Barry spoke as if he was in support of Gray.

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Ald. Carrie Austin Gives Son Top Ward Job

March 29th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Chicago Sun Times) — If they ever make a sit-com about Chicago’s City Hall, it might be called, “All in the Family.”  Now, Ald. Carrie Austin (34th) has crafted a new episode — by installing her son as her ward superintendent.  Until recently, Lemuel Austin III was a $73,216-a year laborer for the Department of Water Management.  Now, he has his mother’s political fate in his hands. As ward superintendent, he will be paid $75,512 a year and be singularly responsible for housekeeping in the South Side ward — everything from snow removal, garbage collection and street sweeping to tree trimming, graffiti removal and rodent control.  Former alderman-turned-County Commissioner William Beavers (7th) once had his brother working as his ward superintendent. Before being convicted on federal corruption charges, former Ald. Arenda Troutman (20th) had her sister doing the same.

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Ald. Carrie Austin Gives Son Top Ward Job

March 29th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Chicago Sun Times) — If they ever make a sit-com about Chicago’s City Hall, it might be called, “All in the Family.”  Now, Ald. Carrie Austin (34th) has crafted a new episode — by installing her son as her ward superintendent.  Until recently, Lemuel Austin III was a $73,216-a year laborer for the Department of Water Management.  Now, he has his mother’s political fate in his hands. As ward superintendent, he will be paid $75,512 a year and be singularly responsible for housekeeping in the South Side ward — everything from snow removal, garbage collection and street sweeping to tree trimming, graffiti removal and rodent control.  Former alderman-turned-County Commissioner William Beavers (7th) once had his brother working as his ward superintendent. Before being convicted on federal corruption charges, former Ald. Arenda Troutman (20th) had her sister doing the same.

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In Chicago Politics is a Family Business

February 15th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Chicago Sun Times) — “Say hello to your mother for me.”  Ebony Tillman gets that a lot while campaigning for 3rd Ward alderman.  After all, her iconic fancy-hat-wearing mom, former Ald. Dorothy Tillman, was her neighborhood’s colorful and quotable ward boss for 20 years — until getting unseated by Ald. Pat Dowell in 2007.  “I would say that people ask about my mom every other door, but really it’s more like every door,” Ebony Tillman said. “It’s the first question they ask everywhere I go. Even at the train station. It makes me feel very proud.”  She’s not alone.  Four other children of former aldermen also are making bids to oust incumbent ward bosses on the Feb. 22 ballot.

Keeping political power in the family — like the Daleys, Burkes, Carotherses, Strogers, Lipiniskis, Puchinskis, Madigans and Cullertons, to name a few — is a very Chicago thing to do.  Keeping political power in the family — like the Daleys, Burkes, Carotherses, Strogers, Lipiniskis, Puchinskis, Madigans and Cullertons, to name a few — is a very Chicago thing to do.  “Machine politics always has had nepotism as one of its prime characteristics,” Chicago political expert and former Ald. package Simpson said. “Many times there are relatives on the [government] payroll and it’s not very different if one is alderman. It’s very common for one to grow up in the family business the way [Mayor] Richard M. Daley did growing up in his father’s household.”

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