All Articles Tagged "user data"

Tech Talk: The Average iPhone 5 Facebook User Is a 32-Year-Old Man in Florida Searching for “Honey Boo Boo”

November 8th, 2012 - By Kimberly Maul
Share to Twitter Email This

iStockphoto

Social media advertising company Optimal analyzed Facebook users who access the site via the iPhone 5, breaking down users to give advertisers more insight when planning mobile Facebook campaigns.

The average age of an iPhone 5 Facebook user is 32.6 years old and users are more likely to be male than female, 59 percent to 41 percent.  The top three search terms on Facebook on the iPhone 5 were “UPS,” “Honey Boo Boo,” and “Obamacare.” California, New York, Texas, and Florida were the top states for iPhone 5 Facebook users.

“We hope this kind of data will give them some new and unique insights, and also get them thinking about new kinds of ad campaigns they can look to run using our Optimal platform,” the company’s CEO Rob Leathern said to MediaPost.

MediaPost also reported that Facebook’s mobile ad impressions were 20 to 40 times higher than on the desktop, based on Optimal’s initial mobile campaigns for the site.

We didn’t see any details about an ethnic breakdown for this study. However, The New York Post reported back in September that 55.5 percent of all mobile users in this country have a smartphone. “Sixty-six percent of Asians, 56 percent of Hispanics and 55 percent of African-Americans use smartphones to check e-mail, play games and surf the Web,” the paper reported. In last place were whites, with only 45 percent of that demographic using a smartphone. Nielsen, which conducted the research, says the discrepancy has to do with age; younger people are “digital natives” and minorities skew younger.

In other iPhone news, Samsung’s Galaxy SIII smartphone outsold the iPhone 4S globally in the third quarter of 2012, according to research firm Strategic Analytics. Samsung sold 18 million phones during that time, boosting its profits up 91% over Q3 2011. Meanwhile, Apple sold 16.2 million iPhone 4S devices.

The win is short-term for Samsung, though, as the iPhone 5 debuted during the fourth quarter and is roundly expected to become the most popular smartphone by the end of the year.

Sony Exposes 77 Million to Identity Theft — Is Sorry Enough?

May 2nd, 2011 - By TheEditor
Share to Twitter Email This

(Daily Finance) — Sony executives bowed in apology Sunday for a security breach in the company’s PlayStation Network that caused the loss of personal data of some 77 million accounts on the online service.  “We deeply apologize for the inconvenience we have caused,” said Kazuo Hirai, chief of Sony Corp.’s PlayStation video game unit, who was among the three executives who bowed for several seconds at the company’s Tokyo headquarters in the traditional style of a Japanese apology. Hirai said parts of the service would be back this week and that the company would beef up security measures. But he and other executives acknowledged that not enough had been done in security precautions, and promised that the company’s network services were under a basic review to prevent a recurrence.  Hirai said the FBI and other authorities had been contacted to start an investigation into what the company called “a criminal cyber attack” on Sony’s data center in San Diego, California.  Sony said account information, including names, birth dates, email addresses and log-in information, was compromised for players using its PlayStation Network. Hirai asked all users to change their passwords.

Web Start-Ups Offer Bargains for Users’ Data

May 31st, 2010 - By TheEditor
Share to Twitter Email This

(New York Times) — As concern increases in Washington about the amount of private data online, and as big sites like Facebook draw criticism that they collect consumers’ information in a stealthy manner, many Web start-ups are pursuing a more reciprocal approach — saying, in essence: give us your data and get something in return.

Read More…

Web Start-Ups Offer Bargains for Users’ Data

May 31st, 2010 - By TheEditor
Share to Twitter Email This

(New York Times) — As concern increases in Washington about the amount of private data online, and as big sites like Facebook draw criticism that they collect consumers’ information in a stealthy manner, many Web start-ups are pursuing a more reciprocal approach — saying, in essence: give us your data and get something in return.

Read More…