All Articles Tagged "schools"

Newark Is Betting on a Wave of New Principals

September 16th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(New York Times) — There is Sonn Sam, a Rhode Island transplant who could be mistaken for one of the students at his alternative high school, with his shaven head, sneakers and tattooed left arm.  There is Chaleeta Barnes, who was promoted after just three years as a math coach at the Newark elementary school where her mother once taught.  And there is Raymond Peterson, the founding principal of Bard High School Early College in Manhattan, who came out of retirement to start a similar school in Newark.  These are some of the 17 new principals — 11 of them under age 40, 7 from outside Newark — recruited this year to run nearly a quarter of the city’s schools. They were hired by Cami Anderson, the new schools superintendent, as part of an ambitious plan to rebuild the 39,000-student district, which has long been crippled by low achievement and high dropout rates, but now is flush with up to $200 million from prominent donors, including Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook.

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Chancellor: University System Will Study Merging Colleges

September 15th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(AJC) — After years of expansion, college leaders took the University System of Georgia down a different path Wednesday by discussing campus consolidations and other steps to save money.  Chancellor Hank Huckaby said the system will review whether college mergers would be cost-effective and develop criteria to determine potential candidates among the 35 campuses.  It’s too soon to say how many campuses would be impacted or how much money it would save, but this represents a shift in priorities for a system that opened a new school — Georgia Gwinnett College — in 2006.  Huckaby also announced a systemwide study of how colleges use existing buildings to determine if, and where, new construction may be needed. He also called for the system office to collaborate more with colleges and architects on construction proposals and designs. Both steps address concerns about growing construction costs, he said.

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Harvard's Hip Hop Archivist

September 15th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Rolling Out) — Professor Marcyliena Morgan understands how important hip-hop culture is to society. As the director of the The Hip-Hop Archives at Harvard, Morgan facilitates the examination of hip-hop culture and art from an intellectual perspective. During rolling out’s recent visit to The Hip-Hop Archive, Morgan discussed why the study of hip-hop is needed at an Ivy League institution and how the hip-hop generation has approached higher education.

How did The Hip-Hop Archives come into existence?  The Hip-Hop Archives came about when I was a professor at UCLA. Many of my students were involved in hip-hop in the late ’90s. They would bring me hip-hop material and I took a closer look at it. I am a linguistic anthropologist so I’m interested in language and culture.

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SAT Scores Slip

September 15th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Inside Higher Education) — SAT scores are down this year. And while the College Board played down that news and attributed the falling scores to growth in the test-taking population, the downward shift runs counter to recent patterns. The data also show continuation of a trend that has concerned many educators for years: growing gaps by race and ethnicity in how students perform on average on the test.  The trend in recent years has been a point up in one part of the SAT, offset by a point down in another part — with minimal movement in total. But this year saw a three-point decline in critical reading, a one-point decline in mathematics, and a two-point decline in writing.

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Heads of CPS, Teachers Union Debate

September 14th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Chicago Tribune) — The two sides waging a public tug of war over the future of Chicago Public Schoolsplayfully sparred Tuesday night in a live debate over contentious issues including a longer school day and teacher pay and evaluations.  But CPS chief Jean-Claude Brizard and Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis also found common ground on what it takes to improve the city’s sagging neighborhood schools and expand education options for all students in the city.  Speaking in front of an audience of about 700 people, many of whom were teachers and union supporters, at the University of Illinois at Chicago Forum, Brizard deflected criticism that his administration was trying to bypass the union in its effort to lengthen the CPS school day by 90 minutes.

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APS Beefs up Academic Help

September 13th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(AJC) — Atlanta Public Schools announced plans Monday to offer extra help to struggling students in response to a widespread cheating scandal, but the district may never know for sure how many were victims of academic fraud.  Existing intervention programs designed to help students during the school day will be increased from 12 weeks to 25 and expanded from 58 to all 100 schools. The program will target students who failed to score on grade level on the 2011 Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT). Teachers will be given additional training, and the district is planning to reach out to parents to increase help at home.

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Going Glove to Glove with Mayor Emanuel

September 12th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Chicago Tribune) — The woman who once promised a boxing match with Mayor Rahm Emanuel for the rights of teachers and the hearts of Chicago’s public school children is getting up off the mat.  Bullied and bludgeoned by weeks of intense public debate over a longer school day, Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis fought back Friday by filing an unfair labor practices complaint againstChicago Public Schools leadership and accusing Emanuel of trying to intimidate her in a profanity-filled tirade recently at City Hall.  The time had come, Lewis said, to make a stand.  “Everybody knows who Rahm Emanuel is. He wants to win. He’s dirty. He’s lowdown. He’s a street fighter,” Lewis said. “This is Rahm Emanuel trying to prove a point, trying to flex his muscles. He’s trying to put his fingers in our faces because he ultimately wants to bust this union, bust all the unions.”

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High School in South Atlanta Sends All Its Grads to College

September 12th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(AJC) — Less than a decade ago, Atlanta parents used their school system’s open enrollment policy to send their kids anywhere but Carver High School.  Officials nearly closed the school. Instead, after the nearby Carver Homes project was bulldozed, they split the campus into four smaller schools that focused on art, technology, science and college prep.  One of those schools, the Early College Academy, posted sharp gains.  “That is the highest performing school we have right now,” Superintendent Erroll Davis said of Early College at a recent public forum. “I don’t know that everybody knows that. We haven’t publicized it.”

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Middle Class Schools Missing the Mark

September 12th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Wall Street Journal) — Middle-class public schools educate the majority of U.S. students but pay lower teacher salaries, have larger class sizes and spend less per pupil than low-income and wealthy schools, according to a report to be issued Monday.  The report, “Incomplete: How Middle-Class Schools Aren’t Making the Grade,” also found middle-class schools are underachieving. It pointed to their national and international test scores and noted that 28% of their graduates earn a college degree by age 26, compared to 17% for lower-income students and 47% for upper-income students.  Third Way, a Democratic think tank that claims to “advocate for private sector economic growth,” based its report on data from the Census Bureau, the U.S. Department of Education, and national and international testing programs. The report doesn’t include parochial or private-school students.

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State Weighs Testing Curbs on Teachers

September 9th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Wall Street Journal) — New York state teachers could be banned from administering and grading their own students’ standardized tests under a series of changes education officials are proposing after cheating scandals erupted in several other states.  An internal Education Department task force said Thursday the state could improve the way it handles the 6 million tests administered annually from kindergarten through high school.  “It is imperative that those tests are not compromised,” the panel’s report stated. “A reliable measure of student performance is vital to students’ college and career preparedness.”  They are also more important than ever to teachers and principals. In New York state this year, teacher evaluations will be based in part on student test scores. New York City already uses an analysis of scores in some teacher tenure decisions.

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