Causes Of Non-Menopausal Hot Flashes

August 30, 2016  |  
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There’s good news and bad news about hot flashes. The good news? Just because you have hot flashes doesn’t mean that you’re going into menopause. The bad news? You can have hot flashes at almost any time in your life. I know you probably thought you were clear of those for as long as you still have your period, but the female body is a sensitive thing. Both men and women have hormones, but it seems like they wreak far more havoc on us women. They can drastically alter our moods to a point where we don’t even recognize ourselves, lead to a weird hue on the skin of certain parts of our body, and they can cause us to be too damn hot when nobody else in the room is dropping any sweat. Fortunately, you can usually pinpoint the cause of non-menopausal hot flashes.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

First, let’s identify a hot flash

A hot flash isn’t just a rise in body temperature. A hot flash is a spontaneous and drastic rise in body temperature that can leave you feeling flushed, and even dizzy. So, if you’re just kind of warm all of the time, that’s not a hot flash. Now let’s look at some causes.
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Antidepressants

Many women report experiencing hot flashes when they take the antidepressant Prozac. Ironically, in some cases, antidepressants are prescribed to treat hot flashes, but they can have the opposite of the intended effect.
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Shutterstock

Thyroid conditions

Rapid heartbeat, a flushed appearance and a rise in body temperature are all symptoms of thyroid conditions like hyperthyroidism. These symptoms, when combined, feel remarkably like a hot flash.
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Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Obesity

Studies have found that women who are obese report higher incidents of hot flashes than those who have a normal BMI. This could be because overweight women produce more of the hormone oestrogen, which leads to hot flashes.
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Shutterstock

Osteoporosis medication

The osteoporosis medication Evista (also called raloxifene) is used to prevent a loss of bone density in post-menopausal women, but has also been shown to cause hot flashes. So women who thought they were out of the fire (almost literally) because they finished menopause may experience hot flashes again with this medication.
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Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Tamoxifen

Tamoxifen is used to treat breast cancer, but it can also lead to hot flashes.

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Tramadol

Tramadol is considered a narcotic pain medication and is typically only used to treat severe pain. One of the rare side effects is hot flashes. If someone experiences this side effect, they should contact their doctor immediately.
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Image Source: Shutterstock

Spicy foods

It may seem like a no-brainer, but spicy foods like chili peppers can cause hot flashes. These dilate your blood vessels, which can leave you feeling dizzy, sweaty and hot.
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Shutterstock

Alcohol

If you have hot flashes, you may just be drunk! Or hung over. Alcohol–when in the blood system and when leaving it–can cause hot flashes.
Image: Shutterstock

Image: Shutterstock

Migraines

People who suffer from migraines might also experience hot flashes. These are technically called “flushes” and cause certain areas of the body to become incredibly hot to the touch, and even red.
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Shutterstock

Stress

When you’re stressed, your body produces the hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine. These boost blood circulation, which can make your body feel very hot.
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Shutterstock

Anger

Your body also produces epinephrine and norepinephrine when you’re angry. So, on top of being pissed off at your significant other, you may also deal with a hot flash.
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Image Source: Shutterstock

Food allergies

Some people experience food allergies in the form of hot flashes. Often, they don’t realize they’re having a reaction to food because people associate food allergies with an upset stomach or hives.

 

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Eating disorders

Hot flashes have been associated with both binge eating and bulimia. Doctors believe this is because when you eat a lot at once, your body has to work hard to digest and that generates heat.
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Shutterstock

Urinary tract infections

If you’ve suspected for weeks that you had a urinary tract infection, were too busy to see a doctor, and now are experiencing hot flashes, the two could be related. An untreated UTI can cause a fever that feels like a hot flash.

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