What Your Sleep Says About Your Health

August 30, 2016  |  
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It can be difficult to track the nature of one’s sleep because, well, it’s sleep! If you’re doing it right, you’re unconscious–you’re not awake and taking notes on the matter. Even people who sleep poorly have a hard time tracking their sleep patterns because they are still only half-conscious throughout the night. People who really struggle to sleep generally just want to forget about their rough night and get on with the day. For these reasons and more, a lot of people don’t draw the connection between sleep and their health. But there is a strong connection there. Your sleep patterns can give you great insight into what’s going on inside of your body. And if you draw the connections, you may have better nights of rest ahead of you. Here is what your sleep says about your health.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

You wake up to your snoring

Do you wake up to your own snoring? Do you jolt up in bed because your snoring is interfering with your ability to breathe? Does this happen so regularly that you feel tired on a daily basis?
Corbis

Corbis

What it means

If your snoring has gone to extreme measures, has interfered with your ability to breathe and has made you chronically exhausted, you suffer from sleep apnea. There are simple things one can do, like prop themselves up with a pillow. Sometimes weight loss is necessary. But there is also a minimal surgery that addresses the issue.
Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

Insomnia after plenty of exercise

Most people associate with exercise with a better night’s rest. You get all of your energy out, burn calories, and leave your body exhausted and ready to sleep. So what does it mean if you’re exercising more, but sleeping less?
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

What it means

There is a point at which exercising too much can cause a bad night’s sleep. Exercising too hard can leave one’s heart raised elevated for long past the workout, and this can make it hard to sleep. Intense exercise can also disrupt hormones that make a human fall asleep.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Constant pee breaks

It can be very frustrating to be woken from a deep sleep all because your bladder is full. It’s especially frustrating if you didn’t drink anything before bed.
Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

What it means

Just because you didn’t drink anything before bed doesn’t mean there aren’t still liquids inside of you. There’s a chance that you’re simply drinking too much water. Your organs don’t need all the fluids you’re giving them, so they slowly push them out throughout the night.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Insomnia without caffeine

Some people feel extremely alert, even if the last cup of coffee they had was five hours ago.
Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

What it means

Most people don’t know this, but caffeine can stay in your system for six hours. So, if you have a 5 pm latte habit, and you need to go to bed by 10 pm, you might be out of luck.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

You’re gassy at night

Do you wake up to a, um, nasty smell? Or to some rather forceful gas during the night?
making you bloated

Image Source: Shutterstock

What it means

You might have mild irritable bowel syndrome. If you don’t have regular bowel movements, or you experience a digestive disturbance, your intestines might try to work it out during the night when they’re relaxed.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Regular naps

Do you need daily naps, even though you get plenty of sleep? Does it seem like no amount of sleep can fend off these naps?
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

What it means

Anyone experiencing this should see a doctor. It could be a sign of a vitamin deficiency, depression, or something more serious like cancer.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Difficulty getting up

People who struggle to get up the morning after sleeping eight or more hours should see a doctor.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

What it means

In some cases, struggling to get out of bed after plenty of sleep can be a sign of certain heart conditions, and an increased risk of stroke.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

You can sleep for 14 hours

Without an alarm clock, there’s no knowing when you’d wake up. In fact, you’ve tried it and you’ve consistently slept for 12, 14, 16…hours.
Shutterstock

Shutterstock

What it means

This can be a sign of an underactive thyroid, which can cause fatigue.

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