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If you and your partner are really social, or you want a little help with the rent, you might split a place with a friend. It can actually be a lot of fun, and a great way to transition into living just with your partner eventually. You might, however, worry that the roommate you bring in will have her quirks. But don’t forget: you and your partner might be the annoying roommates! Here is how to not be the worst couple to live with.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

Don’t host too often

First of all, don’t host all of the time. Between you and your partner, you may have a lot of friends over, and forget that maybe sometimes your roommate wants to use the living room to host.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

And don’t just host couples

Try not to exclusively host couple’s dinner parties. You’ll make your roommate feel excluded. Even if you’re generous enough to invite your roommate to join your dinner party, she won’t want to be the 5th or 7th wheel every time. Invite single friends over, too, sometimes.

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Shutterstock

Don’t bring your fights out of your room

Don’t even let your roommate know you and your partner are fighting. She shouldn’t need to feel the tension in the air just because your relationship is troubled.

And fight quietly

When you do fight in your bedroom, don’t yell or throw things or scream. Actually, as a general rule, you shouldn’t be doing that. That’s unhealthy behavior.

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Don’t hog the fridge

You and your partner should just get around half of the fridge—together—and your roommate can have the other half. You two probably share most of your groceries and plan your meals together, anyways. Don’t go overboard on the groceries, leaving your roommate a mere shelf.

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Shutterstock

Bills aren’t 50/50

If your utility bill is $300, it shouldn’t be split up so that you and your partner each pay $75, and your roommate pays $150. You and your partner get to enjoy the big, nice common areas just as much as your roommate; why should you each pay half as much as your roommate does? You’re all benefitting from the heat or the AC or the running water; your roommate shouldn’t single handedly be paying twice as much as either of you do. Cut your roommate a break. That utility bill should be split up three ways, $100 each.

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Be aware of the common space

If you only have one big TV in a common space, clear it with your roommate before you and your boyfriend take it over every night for movie night. She’ll probably be cool with it, but she’ll appreciate you asking rather than feeling entitled to the space.

When family is in town

Just because your family is in town doesn’t mean your house should become the meeting hub. Your roommate will quickly feel like she’s crashing your family reunion if your parents are in the kitchen every morning she wakes up for a week. Your family should probably stay in a hotel if they’ll be in town for more than two nights, and you should find activities to do outside of your home.

Source: Corbis

Source: Corbis

Wear clothes

Just because you and your partner are perfectly fine walking around naked doesn’t mean your roommate is fine with that.

 

 

 

 

Wear enough clothes

Don’t just throw on tiny booty shorts and a see through tank top, and don’t let your boyfriend wander around in boxers. Your roommate sees right through that half-a**ed attempt to wear clothing.

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Shutterstock

Easy on the PDA

Don’t make out in the kitchen. Don’t dry hump on the couch in the common areas. Try not to have breakfast on your partner’s lap when your roommate is trying to have coffee and perk up.

Don’t gang up for decisions

If the three of you need to decide on something—like a new couch—don’t talk your partner into taking your side on the matter and ganging up on your roommate. That isn’t fair. You’ll always win.

Annoyed woman

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Stay out of her love life

Don’t take it upon yourselves to find your single roommate a partner. If she wants to share stories of her dating life, listen, but don’t pry every night with, “Sooo any dates soon? We’d love to host more couple’s dinners all together!”

Corbis

Corbis

No babytalk around your roommate

If your roommate is in the kitchen at the same time as you and your partner, try to refrain from talking to each other in baby talk. Your roommate will inevitably feel excluded from the conversation. She doesn’t speak that language.

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Shutterstock

Limit your photos

Limit framed photos of you and your partner to your bedroom. You can put one in the common areas maybe. Any more than that and your roommate will feel like she’s living in your home.

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