Food Fight: Michelle Obama vs. the GOP

May 31, 2014  |  

First lady Michelle Obama snaps back at Congress and Republicans who are attempting to weaken school lunch meal standards. Known for her efforts to improve the lives of children by encouraging healthier eating and more movement, the first lady says that Congress’ attempts are “unacceptable.”

Her remarks come as a surprise to many, as Mrs. Obama typically shies away from public political fights or debates, but this issue she was unable to remain silent about.

A bill approved by the House would allow schools to waive the standards currently set in place which provide for healthier food, should they experience a net loss on school food programs for a six-month period. This after some schools say the current policy of an increase of fruits and vegetables in schools is too restrictive.

And as the two sides battle it out to determine what’s best for our children, supporters of each side are speaking out.

At a White House event David Binkle of the Los Angeles Unified School District said, “We’re not just talking about food, we’re talking about education.”

While Leah Schmidt of the School Nutrition Association said, “Our request for flexibility under the new standards does not come from industry or politics, it comes form thousands of school cafeteria professionals who have sown how these overly prescriptive regulations are hindering their effort to get students to eat healthy school meals.”

Nutrition is an overly important factor in the overall health of our children. As we’ve transitioned from the days of square cheese pizza and abundantly fatty foods, into an era where health matters to law and policy makers, we must continue to support whichever side we deem correct.

While some schools complain about sodium regulations and others say many kids just throw the fruits and vegetables away, others say test scores and graduation rates have increased since healthier food was served at their schools.

The first lady says, “We all want our kids to be healthy, and school lunches should reflect that goal. But decisions about how to best go about that should be made by parents and local school nutritionists and administrators, not Washington bureaucrats.”

What do you think, mamas? Should regulations on healthier school lunches be altered, thus making them less healthy?

First lady Michelle Obama snaps back at Congress and Republicans who are attempting to weaken school lunch meal standards. Known for her efforts to improve the lives of children by encouraging healthier eating and more movement, the first lady says that Congress’ attempts are “unacceptable.”

Her remarks come as a surprise to many, as Mrs. Obama typically shies away from public political fights or debates, but this issue she was unable to remain silent about.

A bill approved by the House would allow schools to waive the standards currently set in place which provide for healthier food, should they experience a net loss on school food programs for a six-month period. This after some schools say the current policy of an increase of fruits and vegetables in schools is too restrictive.

And as the two sides battle it out to determine what’s best for our children, supporters of each side are speaking out.

At a White House event David Binkle of the Los Angeles Unified School District said, “We’re not just talking about food, we’re talking about education.”

While Leah Schmidt of the School Nutrition Association said, “Our request for flexibility under the new standards does not come from industry or politics, it comes form thousands of school cafeteria professionals who have sown how these overly prescriptive regulations are hindering their effort to get students to eat healthy school meals.”

Nutrition is an overly important factor in the overall health of our children. As we’ve transitioned from the days of square cheese pizza and abundantly fatty foods, into an era where health matters to law and policy makers, we must continue to support whichever side we deem correct.

While some schools complain about sodium regulations and others say many kids just throw the fruits and vegetables away, others say test scores and graduation rates have increased since healthier food was served at their schools.

The first lady says, “We all want our kids to be healthy, and school lunches should reflect that goal. But decisions about how to best go about that should be made by parents and local school nutritionists and administrators, not Washington bureaucrats.”

What do you think, mamas? Should regulations on healthier school lunches be altered, thus making them less healthy?

First lady Michelle Obama snaps back at Congress and Republicans who are attempting to weaken school lunch meal standards. Known for her efforts to improve the lives of children by encouraging healthier eating and more movement, the first lady says that Congress’ attempts are “unacceptable.”

Her remarks come as a surprise to many, as Mrs. Obama typically shies away from public political fights or debates, but this issue she was unable to remain silent about.

A bill approved by the House would allow schools to waive the standards currently set in place which provide for healthier food, should they experience a net loss on school food programs for a six-month period. This after some schools say the current policy of an increase of fruits and vegetables in schools is too restrictive.

And as the two sides battle it out to determine what’s best for our children, supporters of each side are speaking out.

At a White House event David Binkle of the Los Angeles Unified School District said, “We’re not just talking about food, we’re talking about education.”

While Leah Schmidt of the School Nutrition Association said, “Our request for flexibility under the new standards does not come from industry or politics, it comes form thousands of school cafeteria professionals who have sown how these overly prescriptive regulations are hindering their effort to get students to eat healthy school meals.”

Nutrition is an overly important factor in the overall health of our children. As we’ve transitioned from the days of square cheese pizza and abundantly fatty foods, into an era where health matters to law and policy makers, we must continue to support whichever side we deem correct.

While some schools complain about sodium regulations and others say many kids just throw the fruits and vegetables away, others say test scores and graduation rates have increased since healthier food was served at their schools.

The first lady says, “We all want our kids to be healthy, and school lunches should reflect that goal. But decisions about how to best go about that should be made by parents and local school nutritionists and administrators, not Washington bureaucrats.”

What do you think, mamas? Should regulations on healthier school lunches be altered, thus making them less healthy?

Food Fight: Michelle Obama vs. the GOP

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