Let’s Not Get It On: Experts Weigh In On When You Should Not Have Sex

November 14, 2018  |  

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While the inner freak in us may think that any time is a good time to get down and dirty, there are a couple of instances where you should hit the pause button. This Is Insider spoke to some sex experts about when we should give lovemaking a rest in your relationship.

UTI

Sometimes pesky Urinary Tract Infections or UTI’s can be resolved by jugging some cranberry juice, other times, you may need something stronger like an antibiotic. Either way, you want to lay off VITAMIN D (or P) until your symptoms are resolved. Diana Rodriguez at Everyday Health said that if you don’t wait, you could worsen the infection or cause pain.

Right After A Bikini Wax

Right after you get your pubes stripped off, the area is extra sensitive, so it makes sense to slow down on some rapid activity, UK-based wax expert Kim Lawless recommends. Give your nether regions 24 hours before you stress them out again.

Don’t Have Sex To Settle Arguments/Just Because Your Partner Wants To

“Having sex to keep the peace, to be agreeable in order to please a partner or to prevent an argument is the worst kind of idea,” , professional sex educator, Domina Franco told INSIDER.

“Someone badgering you to have sex until they wear you down into a ‘yes’ is a sure recipe for disaster,” Franco said. You both should be excited about sexy time, otherwise, you may want to give it a break.

Drunk Sex Can Blur Lines Of Consent

Even if this is your Nth time getting knocking boots with your boo, consent can be withdrawn at any time. Having sex while drunk can still impair judgment and blur the lines of consent.

“There would be a lot of people who may say having sex when under the influence of drugs or alcohol isn’t a great idea. In some ways I agree – because I don’t know that you can fully consent if your decision-making abilities are blurred,” Franco said.

Before A Pap Smear

Make sure you keep the nut out of your gut before your annual Pap smear.

“Semen can interfere with any swabs taken for evaluation,” Jessica Shepherd, M.D., an assistant professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology and director of Minimally Invasive Gynecology at The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, told Glamour.

 

 

 

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