How The Cold Months Affect Your Skin

October 10, 2018  |  
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winter skin tips

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Everyone responds differently to the change of seasons. In the colder months, some people cheer up at the sight of leaves falling, while others scramble to find ways to beat seasonal depression. Some pack on the pounds during the holiday season, due to all of the cookies in the office and candy-centric gifts. Others lose weight because they aren’t out having boozy brunches on sunny patios every weekend. And, of course, one’s skin can have a variety of reactions. Some people love the winter because it’s when their skin looks the prettiest. The sweat and sun of summer cause them to break out and look blotchy, and they’re glad to see it go. Other women, however, condemn winter as the season that messes with their complexion. If you’re the latter, you should know about how winter affects your skin, and what you can do about it.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/Smiling young woman riding snow sledge in snow.

Caps and earmuffs

You’re wearing beanies, scarves, and earmuffs to stay warm. But these touch your forehead, chin, and cheeks and can carry acne-causing bacteria. Don’t forget that you still sweat even when it’s cold out, so these winter accessories are grabbing onto some germs.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/Woman wearing winter clothes holding snow in her hands and blowing it.

Clean accessories often

Make sure to clean your winter accessories often, especially those that will touch your bare skin. This could be an excuse to expand your collection of warm hats and other such items.

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Long but dehydrating showers

After waiting on the cold sidewalk for a bus or taxi, or walking home on the chilly streets, all you want to do is take a nice, long, hot bath. Unfortunately, all of those vapors dry out your skin.

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Woman playing with bubbles in bath

Keep baths short

Do your best to keep bath and shower times the same that they were during the summer. Some steam is good to open the pores and help them take in your moisturizer, but not too much.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/Close-up of a woman washing her face

That old cleanser

During the summer, you likely used a drying cleanser because your face constantly felt greasy. Now, however, when you aren’t sweating nearly as much, that cleanser could just be stripping your skin of necessary oils.

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Switch to a gentle cleanser

Switch to a gentle cleanser during the winter months. Since sweat isn’t clogging your pores as much, you don’t necessarily need one with such strong acne-fighting properties.

winter skin tips

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You’re blasting the heater

You want to keep the inside of your home nice and toasty, so you’re running that heater all day and night. This, however, makes the air inside of your home very dry, which isn’t great for your skin.

winter skin tips

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Add a humidifier

While in summer you may have used a dehumidifier, now it’s time to switch to a humidifier. Keeping humidity levels balanced in your home will stop your pores from over-producing oil.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/A young African-American couple in front of a cabin in the woods smiling as they walk, holding hands. It is a cold autumn day, so they have dressed warmly in jackets and hats.

You aren’t using sunscreen

Now that the sun appears to be hiding, you’re ditching the sunscreen. But don’t let the weather fool you—you can still suffer UV damage in the winter.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/Attractive female applying sunscreen on holiday

You still should use sunscreen

Wearing sunscreen all year round is an important part of sun safety. In fact, if you have hyperpigmentation or sun spots, you may have picked those up during the winters when you skipped sunscreen—not during the summer.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/Black woman wearing warm sweater

The weather dries you out

Overall, the winter weather can be very drying on the skin. You likely notice that you have to apply lip balm much more often when it’s cold out, and while the skin on your face doesn’t noticeably peel as much as that on your mouth, it’s still suffering.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/Beautiful black woman applying moisturizer on her face while looking at camera smiling

Get a better moisturizer

Don’t use the same moisturizer you were using during the summer. You need to upgrade to a deeply hydrating one for the winter months. Consider adding hyaluronic acid to your routine since it helps your skin retain moisture.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/wool sweaters

You’re wearing wool

Wool keeps you nice and warm. It’s so insulating, in fact, that you barely need to layer when you have a big wool coat. However, it’s also very itchy and can irritate the skin.

winter skin tips

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Layer with cotton

Even if your wool sweater keeps you warm enough, you should still layer with a cotton t-shirt or tank top beneath. Make sure only natural fabrics actually come in contact with your skin, and put your wool over those.

winter skin tips

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You aren’t exercising

You aren’t exercising enough because, well, it’s too cold outside to jog, and driving through the snow to the gym sounds miserable. Plus, nobody notices the extra pounds under your big sweaters.

winter skin tips

Gettyimages.com/Young people in United States using their free time to do some sports or physical activity.

Keep that blood flowing

Exercise is important for your skin because it maintains healthy circulation in your face. This is an important part of your skin’s ability to rejuvenate itself. So, however you have to, keep pumping iron in the winter.

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