All Articles Tagged "twitter"

Comedienne Retta, A Seat Filler, And Commentary On Racial Injustice

August 28th, 2014 - By Veronica Wells
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Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Please tell me y’all watch “Parks and Recreation,” affectionally known as “Parks and Rec” for those in the in crowd. If you don’t, you’re missing out on a whole bunch of goodness, a lot of goodness.

But that’s only part of the reason why I’m here today.

“Parks and Rec” features the brilliant comedienne Retta. And she is everything. Sharp, in touch, and of course hilarious. In case you’re not familiar, this interview of Retta with Conan will tell you practically everything you need to know about her.

In other words she’s the ish.

And feeling the way I do about Retta, I don’t take it lightly when people come for her. But I also look forward to it because she will read you for filth. That’s exactly what happened at the Emmy’s earlier this week with a random type of dude.

Retta is known for live tweeting and so naturally, she did so with the Emmys.

But before the show even got going, she had to deal with the seat filler dude.

She tweeted the awkward interaction.

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter

Screen Shot 2014-08-28 at 11.18.59 AM

So once the seat filler got home and saw that Retta was tweeting about him, picture and all, he didn’t take too kindly to it and started insulting her, by calling her fat and smelly…very elementary school.

I’m not really going to discuss his insults because they were unoriginal, irrelevant to the initial altercation and just stupid. What is interesting though is the conversation it’s since sparked. One of Retta’s twitter followers asked her why she said it was “very white of her” to call security. She even used the “Keep It Classy” hashtag as a way to let her know she thought it was tactless.

And Retta let her know umm… the random man challenging her very presence at the Emmys–when she had more reason to be there than he did– was something she was not going to let slide. And she proceeded to educate. See what she said in a series of ten tweets.

This is a classic example of diff points of view. By saying it was “white” of me, I read it as I’m not taking the assumptive stereotypical “black” route by being confrontational and thus putting me in the “guilty of being black” position but rather chose to go the white/safe/appropriate route of seeking an authority figure. 

I haven’t spoken up about it or posted on social media about it because it put me in such a place of rage that I couldn’t see straight but the rawness of the Michael Brown tragedy and the “guilty of being black” inequity is at the front of my (and many others’) mind these last 2 weeks. Yes, you were coming from a place of was race necessary? You are white (drawing from your profile pic.) As a black person ON the day of Michael Brown’s funeral, I was coming from a place of WHAT THE EVER LIVING FUCK?!? For me it is pervasive and pollutes almost every thought. So you are right. My joke didn’t need to be about race. But neither did that shooting on Aug 9th and many others that have taken place in the past. And I guess I just chose your tweet to make my social media statement on how I felt about Michael Brown’s shooting. Probably unfair but there’s a lot of that shit going around.”

Well…

15 Celebrities Who Constantly Get Dragged On Social Media

August 27th, 2014 - By Meghan Williams
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Most celebrities get tons of love and support from their online fan bases so we wonder how these 15 celebs who seemingly get no social media love — like ever — must feel. But considering most internet users have absolutely no chill, we’re sure it can’t be too great.

Draya

The social media dragging of Draya has been fueled by epic fails like her struggly Father’s Day breakfast, stiff twerk video, and attempted dig at Kim Kardashian’s “azz”. But at least our favorite (non)basketball wife of LA has a sense of humor about the whole thing. Right?

Did Juelz Santana Blast Baby Mama Kimbella For Showing Her Glutes?

August 20th, 2014 - By Veronica Wells
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Juelz Santana Blast Baby Mama Kimbella

Source: Instagram

There’s a new trend taking over social media, Instagram specifically. It’s called “Blast your baby mama.”

“Love and Hip Hop New York” star, model, and the mother of two of Juelz Santana’s children, Kimbella, recently posted one of her standard backshots on Instagram.

Nothing extraordinary about that. But then immediately after, Juelz took to Twitter, saying:

Maybe the kissy faces are to show he meant no harm. 

We’ve seen this before haven’t we? This reminds me of the way in which T.I. tried to come for Tiny after she posted a shot of her in a bikini on the beach. The only difference is that T.I. was very clear that he didn’t approve. And with Santana’s kissy faces, I’m not sure if this is some type of paternalistic shade or an invitation for her to strip for the people. If it really is a jab, isn’t this interesting? It’s always funny to me when men suddenly want to change the very behavior that attracted them in the first place. Kimbella does this and Juelz certainly didn’t have a problem having kids with her, knowing all that information up front. But it could have been the complete opposite. Who knows, maybe Juelz wants homegirl laying spread eagle on a bed of white sheets somewhere. Reading the tweets, what do you think? Then again, the upcoming season of “Love and Hip Hop New York” is coming up, so this could all be a way to start some mess for the show. 

Have You Noticed A Lack Of News About Ferguson On Your Facebook Page?

August 19th, 2014 - By Ann Brown
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Are some social media outlets omitting the biggest news of the past week from your timeline? Depending whether you are on Facebook or Twitter your news feed about the uproar in Ferguson, Mo., over the fatal police shooting of unarmed Black teenager Michael Brown could be entirely different.

The difference is an algorithm, which dictates a lot of what happens on social media. An algorithm is a mathematical formula that decides what you see and when you see it. Twitter’s feed isn’t dictated by an algorithm. Tweets are seen in real time. Facebook, however, uses a complex algorithm to decide what winds up in your news feed. Although Facebook won’t reveal its algorithm, it is partly based on your history of likes, clicks or shares.

Ars Technica’s Casey Johnson tells The Washington Post that Facebook’s algorithm tends to omit controversial content, which racially charged protests could be seen as. “There is a reason that the content users see tends to be agreeable to a general audience: sites like [BuzzFeed, Elite Daily, Upworthy, and their ilk] are constantly honing their ability to surface stuff with universal appeal. Content that causes dissension and tension can provide short-term rewards to Facebook in the form of heated debates, but content that creates accord and harmony is what keeps people coming back,” says Johnson.

Johnson’s theory carries some weight. A Georgia Institute of Technology study of how political content affects users’ perceptions of Facebook, found that “because Facebook friend networks are often composed of ‘weak ties’ where the threshold for friending someone is low, users were often negatively surprised to see their acquaintances express political opinions different from their own. This felt alienating and, overall, made everyone less likely to speak up on political matters (and therefore, create content for Facebook),” summarized Johnson.

Take the situation in Ferguson for example. According to University of North Carolina sociologist Zeynep Tufekci, last Wednesday, when there were riots in Ferguson and arrests of journalists, she heard of the events in real time on her Twitter feed. Posts about Ferguson didn’t appear in her Facebook feed until the next morning.

“Would Ferguson be buried in algorithmic censorship?” she wrote on Medium. Adding, “How the Internet is run, governed and filtered is a human rights issue.”

Facebook, Twitter Making Changes That Impact What You See On Your Timeline. Some Good, Some Not So Much.

August 18th, 2014 - By Lauren R.D. Fox
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Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Facebook will now label fake news articles as satire because users read the articles and think it’s the truth. Satirical media outlets such as The Onion will be the subject of such labeling. Facebook representatives told Buzzfeed:

“We are running a small test which shows the text [‘Satire’] in front of links to satirical articles in the related articles unit in News Feed. This is because we received feedback that people wanted a clearer way to distinguish satirical articles from others in these units.”

Chances are, a good number of people have been called out for falling for something that wasn’t real. So helping people recognize satire might be a good change. But Twitter has also put a change in place that’s rubbing people the wrong way.
The social network has started posting tweets on user timelines that have been favorited by others they follow. “Why does my twitter timeline randomly show me what people have favourited and who they follow? I don’t give a sh*t,”writes Rosie from London. Well all righty then. They will also receive notifications when others follow other Twitter users. The Next Web says Twitter is also taking away Bing translations from tweets and sending notifications when people start following a handle (we’ve received notices as people have started following reporters covering the situation in Ferguson).

Pando Daily also reports that Twitter may switch to a Facebook algorithm. By doing so, Twitter timeline content will be selected for users. Pando’s David Holmes says if this happens, Twitter users will not receive important information on breaking news as they do now, one of the major pluses of being on Twitter.

Del Harvey, head of Twitter’s Trust and Safety team, exclusively told IT World, that they’re also looking at rules that will curb trolls like those that drove Robin Williams’ daughter Zelda off of social media entirely. “[Twitter] suspended a number of accounts related to this issue for violating our rules, and we are in the process of evaluating how we can further improve our policies to better handle tragic situations like this one. This includes expanding our policies regarding self-harm and private information, and improving support for family members of deceased users.”

Twitter has yet to respond about it’s recent changes regarding the favorited tweets. Any thoughts on these changes?

Twitter Says 23 Million Accounts Are Actually Just Bots

August 13th, 2014 - By Lauren R.D. Fox
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Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Among the many Twitter users are journalists, Scandal fans, Bachelorette hate watchers, politicians, major corporate brands, and bots. Quartz reports that approximately 8.5 percent of Twitter accounts are automatically updated without user-initiated action.

Also, the accounts that are a part of this percentage are accounts that are not owned by Twitter. Therefore, they only request data from Twitter in order to display tweets on mobile apps. These automated accounts added up to 23 million of Twitter’s monthly active users at the end of June 2014.

These automated accounts should not be labeled as spam necessarily. However, Twitter stated, these bots aren’t useful to advertisers, a critical audience because of the money they spend. Advertisers want to reach potential clients, which these millions of users are not. Because of this, Twitter shareholders should reconsider if the social media platform should have automated accounts at all. With these fuzzy stats and many accounts that are not “real,” advertisers might become weary of investing in advertising campaigns on the social media platform.

It should be recognized, these statistics do not reflect accounts that tweet from other apps, Quartz says. In fact, upon further inspection, there are a number of different kinds of accounts that fall under different categories based on the “legalese” in Twitter’s rules.

“Twitter’s update today specifies that the 14% figure ‘included certain users who accessed Twitter through owned and operated applications.’ Those are likely TweetDeck and Twitter for Mac, which are favored by power tweeters but, for technical reasons, aren’t counted in many of the company’s official statistics.”  

Twitter bots aren’t new to the social network. According to City AM , 20 percent of the chief executive of Twitter’s followers are automated.

Not On Their Watch: Ohio Festival Removes R Kelly From Lineup After Public Backlash

July 29th, 2014 - By Veronica Wells
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Image Source: WENN.com

Image Source: WENN.com

R. Kelly is an exceptionally talented musician. But sadly now that all of his dysfunction is out there for the world to see, his illness speaks louder than his talent. While there are still plenty of people who still ride for Kellz and his hypersexual music, other Columbus, Ohio residents weren’t having it. And their complaints resulted in Kelly being removed from the Fashion Meets Music Festival on Labor Day weekend.

R. Kelly was scheduled to perform on August 29, kicking off the three day festival in Columbus’ Arena district.

When news broke that he would not be performing, Kelly’s publicist released a statement: “R. Kelly is sorry to disappoint his fans but looks forward to seeing them in the near future during one of his upcoming tours.” 

As soon as the festival announced that Kelly would be the headliner for the festival, complaints started pouring in from angry social media users. As you might assume, they cited the rape accusations and the indictment on his 21 counts of child pornography.

Here’s a sampling of what they had to say, according to the USA Today. 

  • (function() { var useSSL = 'https:' == document.location.protocol; var src = (useSSL ? 'https:' : 'http:') + '//www.googletagservices.com/tag/js/gpt.js'; document.write(''); })();
    style="color: #323333;">“It’s actually very common for sexual predators to put on a good show. That is how they lure their victims.”
  • (Rape victims responded to the Kelly booking with) “sheer horror. That’s why we are upset. Support victims of sexual abuse and don’t ignore them.”
  • “Accepting R Kelly as an artist is to ignore the fundamental basics of human dignity. It’s not like he’s just a player and folks don’t dig it. A very real line was very clearly crossed and this is how we choose to express our disdain for the deeds and support for the victims.”
  • “Vote with your wallets.”

Kelly was found not guilty of those charges in 2008 when jurors stated that while they believed that it was indeed R. Kelly in the tapes, they couldn’t be sure of the age of female participants.

Before Kelly was ever brought to trial, the Chicago Sun Times started publishing an investigative series which detailed Kelly’s history with underaged girls as young as 15.

Initially, the festival organization stood by the choice of R. Kelly but after the noticed the backlash the decided to ask Kelly to step down. Other performers for the weekend include Michelle Williams, Paper Diamond and Destructo, Future Islands and more.

Personally, I think Columbus made the right decision and I wish other individuals, organizations and venues would keep sending this same message until people realize this man has a very real problem and he should seek help.

Goldie Taylor Responds To Stephen A. Smith: “My Father Smashed My Mother’s Face”

July 28th, 2014 - By Lauren R.D. Fox
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Last week we reported, Ray Rice was suspended for only two games of the upcoming NFL season for the domestic violence dispute against his then fiancé, now wife, Janay Palmer. ESPN’s “First Take’s” head reporter, Stephen A. Smith responded to Rice’s consequences stating that women should understand the role they play when they provoke men. His commentary did not sit well with viewers and Smith tried to clarify via Twitter and then more extensively on “First Take”:

“My series of tweets a short time ago is not an adequate way to capture my thoughts so I am using a single tweet via Twitlonger to more appropriately and effectively clarify my remarks from earlier today about the Ray Rice situation. I completely recognize the sensitivity of the issues and the confusion and disgust that my comments caused. First off, as I said earlier and I want to reiterate strongly, it is never OK to put your hands on a women. Ever. I understand why that important point was lost in my other comments, which did not come out as I intended. I want to state very clearly. I do NOT believe a woman provokes the horrible domestic abuses that are sadly such a major problem in our society. I wasn’t trying to say that or even imply it when I was discussing my own personal upbringing and the important role the women in my family have played in my life. I understand why my comments could be taken another way. I should have done a better job articulating my thoughts and I sincerely apologize.”

Although Smith apologized, award-winning journalist Goldie Taylor responded to his original statement via Twitter about her own experience with abuse from a past boyfriend.

Taylor also revealed her mother’s personal experiences of abuse from her husband, Taylor’s father.

Known for her popular Procter & Gamble “My Black Is Beautiful” campaign and contribution to MSNBC, Taylor continues to tell her story of domestic violence for the women whose voices have been silenced because of shame, fear and even death. In 2013, Taylor recounted her tale of abuse in an MSNBC article when news broke of Kassandra “Kasi” Perkins who was fatally killed by boyfriend, Jovan Belcher.

Taylor’s article noted:

It’s been 26 years and I rarely think about the smooth keloid scar in the upper left corner of my back. It’s too easy to forget about the scar above my mother’s eye, a reminder that in a jealous rage my father put her face through a plate glass window. Or the cousin who was chased down and shot in a grocery store parking lot some years ago. Or the friend, pregnant with twins, whose husband tied her up, doused her with gasoline and waved a matchbook under her nose. The number one cause of death for pregnant women is homicide. The perpetrator is almost always the child’s father. It won’t be long before we forget about the contributions Belcher made on the field. There will come a time when you will need some prompting to remember that he murdered Kasi, if you remember her name at all. I tell my story, hoping that you will not forget. I tell my story so that maybe, just maybe you will not turn your back on that sister, co-worker or friend. I tell my story because Kasi cannot tell hers.

We salute Taylor for her brave and honest heart.

The tweets above are just a portion of the story Taylor shared today on Twitter, you can read the rest of what she shared here.

Editor’s Note: If you or anyone you know is a victim of abuse, please share the National Abuse Hotline phone number: 1-800-799-7233

Glittery A$$, Sex Tips & Clowning Fools: 10 Reasons To Follow Erykah Badu On Twitter

July 24th, 2014 - By Veronica Wells
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erykah badu's best tweets

Source: WENN

Twitter is the place most of us go to write about our fleeting emotions throughout the day, subtweet about your  job, comment on the latest pop culture event or share the good and bad news of the internet with the rest of your followers. And unless you’ve managed to join the elite club that is Black Twitter, for the most part, your tweets are a drop in the bucket. But if you’re a celebrity, your thoughts and feelings are weighed more heavily and your presence on this social network puts you in touch with adoring masses or an angry mob.

Most celebs need to ignore the haters and naysayers. But Erykah Badu aka @fatbellybella is just not like most celebrities. And if you come for her and she sees you, you can bet you’re going to get mildly clowned… for an extended period of time.

And honestly, the way some people come at Erykah, most of it is quite justified.

Click through the following pages and see what I mean.

Twitter Releases Diversity Report, Tells Same Story As Other Tech Companies

July 24th, 2014 - By Tonya Garcia
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After some pressure from civil rights groups like Rev. Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow PUSH Coalition and ColorofChange.org, along with the transparency of other Silicon Valley giants like Facebook and Google, Twitter has released its diversity numbers. And, no surprise, the company found that its staff is lacking in women and minority workers. Nearly 90 percent of Twitter’s workers are White or Asian. That same percentage occupy technology jobs. About 70 percent of the staff, overall, are White or Asian.

Seventy percent of the company’s staff are male. That percentage goes up to 90 percent when you look at just the tech workers, and 79 percent when you look at the company leadership.

“A Twitter that we can be proud of is diverse, and it’s inclusive,” writes Janet Van Huysse, VP of diversity and inclusion, in a blog post. She says there are a number of employee groups that will be helping with this task, including WomenEng, a women in engineering group, and Blackbird for “Tweeps of color.” Van Huysse says the company has also partnered with Girls Who Code and other groups, as well as lent its support to organizations like Black Girls Code in order to build outreach to diverse groups.

“We know the critical importance of actively recruiting from under-represented communities such as women’s colleges and historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs),” the blog post also says.

ColorOfChange.org released a statement on behalf of its executive director, Rashad Robinson, in response to the report, that reads in part:

“Twitter benefits a great deal from the creativity, energy, and intelligence of Black folks engaging on the platform — both financially and in terms of popularity. Twitter’s blog post recognizes that there is a problem and states a commitment to fixing it. So we invite Twitter to work with ColorOfChange and our allies in hosting a public forum that addresses the company’s plan to recruit and retain more Black talent. We stand ready to help and hope that they will be a leader in this effort to make Silicon Valley a better representation of America.”

All of the big digital companies say that being diverse within their ranks is necessary to keep up with the diversity of users. Black Twitter in particular has become a force that drives the success of television shows like Scandal and has everyone talking about #TimeTitles based on this story from Time magazine, “This Is What Bae Means” based on the new song by Pharrell.

Now that Silicon Valley is aware of its deficiencies, the key will be sticking with what it takes to correct them. This isn’t going to be a quick fix. Turning around an entire industry culture, training workers to operate on the back end of these systems and sustaining that commitment will have to happen over time.

h/t USA Today