All Articles Tagged "thanksgiving"

Is This Petty? He Insulted Me, So I Called Him A “B—h” In Front Of Our Friends On Thanksgiving

November 27th, 2015 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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Have you taken part in a Friendsgiving? It’s a fun little gathering where the homies all get together over a turkey and sides to laugh, drink and be merry before, or in place of, spending the holiday with their family members.

A friend hosted one with about 12 colleagues and her fiancé, and the night went pretty well–until she found herself arguing with her fiancé in front of their friends. Blame it on the alcohol?

According to my friend, she, along with her fiancé and a couple of their friends, decided to play a game of Spades. And you know how serious a game of Spades can get with Black folks. My friend Stacie* and her man weren’t on the same team. At one point, he briefly tried to tell his partner something about a card and Stacie accused him of talking across the board. Of course, he said that’s not what he was doing and Stacie, who had a few glasses of wine already, vehemently disagreed. They had a disagreement about what rules they’ve always followed over the years when playing with their own friends or family, and what was at first a simple back and forth turned into a contentious row of sorts. Eventually, Stacie told him, “Whatever! I’m not trying to talk about it anymore. You’re right, right? Because you always think you’re right.”

When her fiancé responded by accusing her of not only being wrong but being too sensitive and not having a clue of what she was talking about “as usual,” Stacie took her irritation to the next level:

“I said, ‘And you’re acting like a b***h right now trying to play me in front of my people.'”

Emphasis on the ‘B’ in b—h. And just like that, the room went quiet. People knew that things had taken a sharp turn over a partners game of Spades. To lighten the mood, one of Stacie’s friends said, “You see what happens when folks play Spades?! It’s been like 10 minutes and already there’s a fight.” And while the other guests laughed, Stacie and her fiancé were still quiet. He was obviously angry, and Stacie, still irritated but not looking to apologize, just kept quiet.

By the end of the night, when it was time for everyone to leave, she had hoped that they both would have cooled down and could talk, but he wasn’t trying to have a conversation with her at all. When she initiated the discussion, she said that he just shook his head, stopped her mid-sentence and said, “Don’t ever talk to me like that again. Not in front of your friends, not ever. Never again.” From there, he gave her the silent treatment.

But Stacie feels as though her fiancé was the one being disrespectful. She said that he was trying to make her look dumb in front of her friends, so she reacted in anger. She feels sorry for using that language with him but also thinks he owes her an apology.

And this, my friends, is why Spades needs to be left to the big dogs. It’s not a game for the faint-hearted, the uber-sensitive–or the tipsy and highly irritable.

And I think that’s what my friend is forgetting. It’s all a game. People talk sh-t to get in your head and to defend themselves when you question whether or not they’re playing by the rules. And while her fiancé probably could have eased up on her a bit, there’s no excuse for calling your spouse a b—h, whether you’re doing it in front of others or when it’s just the two of you. She took things to the next, next level, and in a way, enervated him in front of others. For that reason, she might need to give him a little space, and when he’s ready to talk, she needs to begin any conversation they have on the matter with an apology. Because we all know had the tables been turned and he called her a b—h, all hell would have broke loose. Game over…

But as always, that’s just my opinion. Do you think she was petty for how she handled everything? Or was her fiancé out of line?


Thanksgiving Leftovers: 12 Tasty Ways To Reinvent Your Holiday Meal

November 27th, 2015 - By Kweli Wright
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Too much turkey? A surplus of stuffing? Go beyond the usual soups and sandwiches this year and take your Thanksgiving leftovers from blah to brilliant with these tantalizing recipes from around the web.

Turkey Tostadas
Turkey Tostadas with Spicy Cranberry-Chipotle Sauce
A medley of turkey, red bell pepper and black beans sit atop toasted tortillas for a “south of the border spin” on Thanksgiving leftovers.

1 large onion, sliced
1 poblano pepper, seeded and sliced
1 large red bell pepper, sliced
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 cups shredded roasted turkey
2 garlic cloves, minced
Salt to taste
8 tostada shells
1 cup refried black beans
Spicy Cranberry-Chipotle Sauce
1 cup crumbled queso fresco (fresh Mexican cheese)
1/2 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves
8 lime wedges

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Saute first 3 ingredients in hot oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat; 6-8 minutes or until onion is golden. Stir in turkey and garlic; cook 2 to 3 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Season with salt to taste.

2. Bake tostada shells on baking sheet at 400 degrees for 3 minutes. Spread shells with refried beans; top with turkey mixture. Drizzle with a small amount of Spicy Cranberry-Chipotle Sauce. Sprinkle with queso fresco.

3. Bake at 400 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Serve with fresh cilantro, lime wedges, and remaining sauce.

Source: Southern Living

Loaded Potato Soup
Your holiday ham and potatoes get new life with this hearty soup topped with cheesy croutons made from leftover dinner rolls.

2 tablespoons butter
1 cup diced smoked ham
4 sliced green onions
1 garlic clove, minced
2 cups mashed potatoes
1 14 oz. can low-sodium chicken broth
1 cup milk
1/3 cup sweet peas
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
Salt and pepper
2 cups torn dinner rolls
1 cup (4 oz.) shredded Cheddar cheese

1. Preheat broiler. Melt butter in a 3-qt. saucepan; add diced ham, sliced green onions, and minced garlic. Saute until golden. Stir in mashed potatoes, chicken broth, milk, peas, and chopped fresh thyme. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Simmer 8 minutes or until thickened. Season with salt and pepper.

2. Spoon into 4 broiler-safe bowls. Top with torn dinner rolls; sprinkle with shredded cheese. Place bowls on a baking sheet and broil for 3 minutes or until golden brown.

Source: Southern Living

Green Bean Casserole Sandwich
Don’t toss that last dollop of green bean casserole! Save it to make a tasty sandwich instead.

2 small pumpernickel party rye bread slices
Green Bean Casserole
1 shaved Parmesan cheese slice

1. Spread butter on 1 side of 2 bread slices. Place 1 slice, buttered side down, on wax paper and top with 1 heaping tablespoonful of green bean casserole and 1 shaved Parmesan cheese slice. Top with remaining bread slice, buttered side up.

2. Cook in a nonstick skillet over medium heat; 2 to 3 minutes on each side or until golden brown and cheese is melted.

Source: Southern Living

The Game’s Thirst Traps And More Things To Be Thankful For This Season

November 26th, 2015 - By Meg Butler
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We’ve all got something to be thankful for this Thanksgiving, and these things definitely belong on the list!

12 Thanksgiving Crafts To Keep The Kids Busy

November 26th, 2015 - By Shayla Perry
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It’s turkey time! Cue the Thanksgiving crafts! These artsy activities are excellent for kids of all ages (yes, including you.) So, grab some glue, a few odds and ends, and get ready to get in touch with your creative side. Let’s be honest, this is also a great way to keep the kids busy when you’re cooking, cracking adult jokes and enjoying some adult beverages.


This Paper Bag Turkey from One Charming Party is a great group project for little ones and the perfect kids’ table centerpiece, stuffed with a pre-feast snack.
You will need: 3-4 bags of popcorn, a large brown grocery bag, 2 small brown lunch bags, a hot glue gun, scissors, white paper for the frills.


1. For the frill, take a sheet of 8 1/2 x 11″ white paper and cut it in half lengthwise. Fold the paper in half lengthwise and make small cuts with a pair of scissors on the folded half to create loops.

2. For the drumsticks, make one hand into a fist and stick it inside the lunch bag. With your other flat hand, press on the bag to mold and smash it down into a more rounded shape. Fill the bag 2/3 of the way with popcorn. Gather up the bottom of the bag and twist to keep it tight. Hot glue the beginning of the length of frill and wrap it around the bottom, twisted part of the lunch bag. Then hot glue the end of the white paper frill to keep it in place.

3. For the main bag, do the same thing as the drumstick to make the corners rounded. Fill the bag up full with popcorn. Fold the sides of the bag in and tuck the bottom edge under. Hot glue the edge shut. Hot glue the legs onto the sides of the “turkey.” It’s best to use a plain brown bag, but if you can only find one with writing on the outside, you can carefully turn the bag inside out and it will be just fine. Easy Peasy.

*If using buttered popcorn to fill the turkey, use parchment or wax paper to line the paper bag to avoid grease marks.

Happy Thanksgiving: 15 Men We’re Grateful For This Year

November 26th, 2015 - By M A
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Credit: FayesVision/

Credit: FayesVision/

Can you believe it — we’re already heading into the homestretch of 2015. With Thanksgiving just around the corner, we felt it was only right to take stock of some of the hottest stars to catch our attention this year and give them a proper Thanksgiving Day salute. Because let us tell you, we are certainly grateful for their presence. Pie Remix: Gingersnap Pumpkin Pie

November 25th, 2015 - By Kweli Wright
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It’s the day before the big day and you’re in search for the perfect pie to make, we’re here to help you with a dessert suggestion that the family will love! Nix that tired pumpkin pie recipe this year and kick it up a notch or two with this vamped up version, courtesy of

Gingersnap Pumpkin Pie with Ginger Cream
Gingersnap cookies and ripe banana add just the right touch of sugar and spice to the conventional pumpkin pie recipe. And just when you thought it couldn’t get any better…ginger whipped cream!

Crumb Crust:
5 tablespoons butter, melted, plus more for greasing
2 tablespoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon fine salt
16 gingersnap cookies
1 sleeve graham crackers (about 9 sheets)

2 cups pumpkin pie puree (about 1 1/2 cans)
1/4 cup dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 large eggs
1 banana, mashed
1 egg white
One 5-ounce can evaporated milk

Ginger Whipped Cream:
3/4 cup heavy cream
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons candied ginger, minced

1. For the crumb crust: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease the sides of a 9-inch springform pan with butter. Wrap the bottom of the pan in foil to prevent leaking. Combine the sugar, salt, 8 of the gingersnap cookies and the graham crackers in a food processor and pulse until crumbly. Drizzle in the butter and continue pulsing until the mixture is the consistency of wet sand. Pour the mixture into the pan and push into the base halfway up the sides using a glass with straight edges. Bake the crust for about 10 minutes and then let cool completely while you make the filling.

2. For the filling: Stir together the pumpkin, dark brown sugar, cinnamon, eggs, banana, egg white and milk in a large bowl. Pour the filling in the baked crumb crust and bake for about 50 minutes. Let cool completely while you make the ginger whipped cream.

3. For the ginger whipped cream: Whip the cream with the sugar until soft peaks form using a hand mixer. Fold in the ginger.

4. Run a thin knife around the edge of the pie to release it from the pan. Load the whipped cream into a piping bag with a large star tip. Pipe the rosettes around the perimeter of the pie and decorate with the 8 remaining gingersnap cookies.

Cook’s Note: Make sure you use a piping bag with a large star tip so the ginger bits in the whipped cream don’t clog the tip.

Recipe and photo courtesy of

#ThanksgivingClapBack: Hilarious Responses To Holiday Family Shade

November 25th, 2015 - By Meg Butler
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Image Source: Twitter

Image Source: Twitter

This year’s family shade starting before you’ve even said grace over the turkey? Just scroll through these hilarious #ThanksgivingClapBack posts for inspiration on how to win in a good roasting session.

Turkey Stuffed With Octopus? Crazy Thanksgiving Dishes

November 25th, 2015 - By Nneka Samuel
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Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

Apparently, turkey is not enough for some meat-loving folk come Thanksgiving.  The holiday gets even more festive with these crazy meat combinations.

Should Parents Eradicate Thanksgiving Altogether?

November 25th, 2015 - By Chuck Creekmur
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A few years ago, I stopped lying. I would no longer be complicit in the gross regurgitation of misinformation surrounding Thanksgiving. I started keeping it real with my daughter, as I keep it real in the world. This is so important now.

These kids are subjected to the mental warfare from all angles, not just around holidays like Thanksgiving. Whether you now it or not, parents need to know their kids are absorbing the times like I vaguely knew Ronald Reagan was no good for Black people. They are absorbing Tamir Rice, undocumented worker’s rights, mass incarceration, #BlackLivesMatter, presidents, and the all-too American scoundrel called racism.

So, how does this link to Thanksgiving?

It was North America’s first great sin – the eradication of the native people of this land. The ills overlooked in the pageantry of Thanksgiving are not abstract. There are specific massacres of native people that were celebrated after the European settlers arrived here. On top of that, there was no actual feast between the natives and the pilgrims. No, buddy. We have to own that this is stolen land in which genocide occurred.

I insist that my child be able to think critically about the world that she lives in. Now, if this means taking off the rose-colored glasses, then so be it. These times are quite dense. Thanksgiving is problematic, but it also represents how we see the world. We’ve been sold stories and these days – despite despotic moves against people of color – we continue to buy. The information is right there!

I don’t know about the rest of the parents out there, but I am my child’s first teacher. Not the schools. Not society. Not her friends. I am. Unlike those other sources, I have my child at the very, very top of my priorities. Being honest is paramount. Keeping is real is not optional. Our parents told us what they were sold. Be good. Don’t fight. Go to college. Get a good job. Marry somebody. Have kids. And you too can sleep comfortably inside of the American Dream.

These days, we say “#StayWoke” and sleeping is old school. This means opening kids eyes as soon as possible is the most important factor. It is not good enough to wait until somebody does them harm, or realize the farce when they are in college or the workforce. We have to arm children with knowledge and information now. It all won’t reach them (kids are hard-headed and programmed non-stop), but they can be better prepared than we were.

I know this is serious stuff right before the holiday. Even if you break bread, let those around you know – this holiday is a commercial product at best. At worst, it’s probably the second biggest lie we tell our children. Santa gets first place. Yet, Thanksgiving is special. It is a microcosm of the myth of apple pie, spangled flags and fireworks. Give the kids a home-cooked pie, tell them about the red/black/green flag, and lastly, let them know were were enslaved when the “Star Spangled Banner” was written.

Feast Fashion: What To Wear To Thanksgiving Dinner

November 25th, 2015 - By MommyNoire Editor
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by Shayla Perry

While most people are in a frenzy to finalize their menus, mastering family recipes and gathering all their pieces for the perfect place setting we’re more excited about figuring out what we’re going to wear. Holiday dressing can be tricky to navigate in any instance but when it’s a holiday that’s centered on eating, well, all bets are off. Finding the happy medium between put together and doing too much is as stressful as finding the right hostess gift (more on that later) and creating the perfect side dish.

Factor in if we’re hosting the festivities we’re usually so busy prepping food and laying out the spread that we don’t spend any time on ourselves and therefore rush through the process of getting dressed simply because we didn’t plan ahead.

The bottom line is we want to look polish and put together but not fussy. We want to enjoy ourselves and get our eat on but not regret our pants choice. And what about if you’re meeting the family for the first time? You don’t want to that girl but you don’t want to be that girl either.

So in true sister-girl style we’ve come up with some stellar outfit ideas for wherever you might find yourself this Thanksgiving. Entertaining at home? No problem. Heading to friends? We’ve got you covered. Take a look at the slide show and then head to your closet and see what you might have that fits the outline of these looks! Let us know if you try any!