All Articles Tagged "redevelopment"

DC Program Turns Vacant Buildings into Apartments

September 29th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(NBC News) — Tough economic times continue to burden Americans, especially when it comes to people losing their jobs and their homes.  While balancing both campaigning and duties as head of state, President Barack Obama fights for his jobs bill, attempting to assuage worries that he has been inattentive to his political base in the black community. He insists that Congress pass it now and argues that this bill will help begin incremental change. Many say that he has not done enough.  But faced with slow change from federal bureaucrats, local governments are taking things into their own hands. The city of Washington has partnered with nonprofit organizations to create a new program that trades hard work on vacant buildings into homes for the homeless. If successful, the program would begin to reduce high unemployment rates, curb increased homelessness, and alleviate shriveling public assistance funds.

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City Warned on Cabrini Housing

August 19th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Chicago Sun Times) — A federal judge this week put the city on notice that it has to speed up efforts to acquire the former Near North high school site for redevelopment into replacement housing for former Cabrini-Green residents — or stand in violation of a 2000 consent decree. Under the agreement reached with tenants a decade ago as the Chicago Housing Authority began its historic Plan for Transformation — tearing down high-rise public housing throughout Chicago — the city was to acquire the site owned by the Chicago Public Schools at Clybourn and Larrabee for new housing.

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United Negro College Fund Headquarters at Center of Shaw Redevelopment

February 8th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Washington Examiner) — The United Negro College Fund made its move to Washington official Monday with the purchase of its new headquarters space in a $150 million development above the Shaw Metro station that many hope will rejuvenate the historic black neighborhood. Called Progression Place, the building is a massive office, residential and retail project that city officials say will bring 500 construction jobs and 300 permanent jobs to the District. UNCF paid roughly $24 million for 50,000 square feet within the building, half the available office space.  At the project’s ceremonial groundbreaking Monday — construction began in December — Mayor Vincent Gray said UNCF’s move from Fairfax would be a shot in the arm for the city’s economy. The city has $20 million invested in the project, which is scheduled to finish in late 2012 and expected to generate at least $25 million in new taxes over the next two decades.  “[We] welcome the jobs that UNCF will bring to the city and the jobs that the new building will generate all around the Shaw neighborhood,” Gray said. City officials lured the nonprofit here with a grant of $710,000 and tax incentives totaling $3.6 million over the next decade.  UNCF President and CEO Michael L. Lomax, co-chairman of Gray’s education transition team, said he hoped other education reform organizations would join the nonprofit in the new building, “making it a center for education foundations, institutes and other reform activities.”

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125th in Flux as Citywide Interest in Harlem Grows

December 13th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(Columbia Spectator) — As local tourism and citywide interest in Harlem expands, some longtime residents and business owners fear that the increased attention on the neighborhood could break up current ties in the area.  A 125th Street rezoning plan, approved in 2008, was designed to promote mixed-use development on Harlem’s main thoroughfare, and the Department of City Planning has been working with the NYC Economic Development Corporation to strengthen the corridor’s retail and culture. Though the recession has halted some of the temporary initial plans, two years after the plan’s approval, residents and experts say that the area is becoming increasingly attractive to those outside of Harlem.

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Plan Seeks to Make Atlanta a Top ‘Green’ City

October 26th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(AJC) — Mayor Kasim Reed on Monday rolled out a plan to make Atlanta a greener city with less smog, more park space, a larger percentage of locally produced food and improved water conservation.  And he wants the moves to make Atlanta one of the nation’s top 10 green cities as ranked by Sustainlane.com, an online site for green living fans. Atlanta ranked 19th in the group’s 2008 peer-reviewed survey, up from 38th.  “It’s an ambitious plan,” said Mandy Mahoney, the city’s director of sustainability, who will lead the charge for Reed. “Mayor Reed has set a high bar.”

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Investing in Urban Centers Key to Growing New U.S. Economy: Brookings

October 26th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(International Business Times) — The key to kick-starting the U.S. economy and create hundreds of thousands of desperately-needed jobs lies in developing America’s one-hundred largest cities, according to a report from Bruce Katz, Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, D.C.  “If we unleash the energies in our [metropolitan areas], we can compete with anyone,” Katz wrote.  “Our 100 largest metropolitan areas constitute a new economic geography, seamlessly integrating cities and suburbs, exurbs and rural towns. Together, they house almost two-thirds of our population, generate 74 percent of our gross domestic product and disproportionately concentrate the assets that drive economic success: patents, advanced research and venture capital, college graduates and Ph.D.s, and air, rail and sea hubs.”

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Atlanta ‘Test Bed’ for Reusing Urban Spaces

October 25th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(Atlanta Journal Constitution) — For decades, metro Atlanta was known for its expansive and new development.  Georgia Tech, however, wants the region to be better known for innovative “urban infill,” what urban planners generally refer to as the redevelopment of industrial areas or land with previous uses.  Using several grants, the school is at the forefront of defining “urban infill” in a blueprint that could help other cities. It is starting with the former Ford plant, which has been proposed as an “aerotropolis,” or generally an area that thrives off nearby airport activity.

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Waterfront Development Poised As World-Class Attraction

October 22nd, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(Afro) — A portion of the smallest quadrant in Washington, D.C., is about to undergo a transformation that could serve as a model for similar waterfront redevelopments across the country.But according to a minority organization that has worked tirelessly to ensure that a Benjamin Banneker memorial is included in the $1.5 billion project along the waterfront in Southwest Washington, the city’s Black residents won’t be the ones telling the story of its success because the developer – except for construction purposes – has no other real interest in the community.
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CityCenter DC Set for Construction

October 22nd, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(Washington Post) — Construction is slated to begin in April on six new buildings and a public plaza on the site of the District’s former convention center, a project that city officials say could cost $950 million and be one of the largest active developments on the East Coast.  The 10-acre downtown site was home to the city’s convention center until it was torn down in 2004, a year after the Walter E. Washington Convention Center opened. It was turned into a surface parking lot and bus terminal as the lead developer, Hines, finalized plans and sought financial partners.

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Rezoned Central Bronx Awaits Residential, Commercial Projects

October 19th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(Wall Street Journal) — A rezoning of 75 blocks in the central Bronx breezed through the city’s land-use-approval process. But the next step promises to be more difficult: encouraging new construction in a long-overlooked part of the borough at a time of economic uncertainty.  The City Council last week gave its final approval to the rezoning proposal, which revamps development restrictions that have been in place since 1961—a time when an elevated train still rumbled above Third Avenue. Together with another plan now under review to rezone a nearly two-mile stretch of Webster Avenue, city planners hope to revitalize and create new housing in a swath of the Bronx north and west of the New York Botanical Gardens and the Bronx Zoo.

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