All Articles Tagged "pregnancy"

Foods You Should Encourage Him To Eat If You’re Hoping To Have A Baby

May 24th, 2016 - By Meg Butler
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Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

Women know a lot when it comes to food and fertility: sweet potatoes help you conceive, eating raw fish is a no-no when you might be expecting, and you should skip the alcohol, no matter what all these new studies try to claim. But what we don’t often think about is how food affects a man’s role in making a baby. What he consumes is just as important as what you eat when you want to start on the road to expanding your family.

Helping him change his diet with the following foods can make him more fertile and also make the process of trying to conceive a little easier. And that’s not the only way he can start pitching in to do his part. There are a few foods that he should avoid if he wants to go half on a baby. They’ll not only interfere with his fertility, but they could also lead to other complications later on.

Draya Michele Shares Video Of Her Delivering Baby Jru In Honor Of Mother’s Day

May 9th, 2016 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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It’s always nice to see the many ways people celebrate motherhood on social media when it’s Mother’s Day. I mean, who doesn’t love a good throwback picture?

But it’s a video that pretty much stole the show on social media late last night. Reality star, actress, and businesswoman Draya Michele recently gave birth to little Jru Scandrick on April 8 (at “16:17,” which is 4:17 p.m.). To celebrate his first month in the world and Mother’s Day, she shared video of herself in the delivery room last month, giving birth to him. In the clip, she can be seen pulling Jru into the world, and embracing the little guy as he let his first cries out.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women out there. We are created to recreate and that is the biggest gift of all from God. I had a silent delivery because I didn’t want to stress my baby and when I pulled him from my body I’ve never felt so important. I’ve made mistakes and had some growing to do and this little guy came at the right time. Orlando, thank you for Jru, Tatiana and Taylor,and loving Kniko unconditionally. Yesenia, bestie, godmother, sister….I couldn’t have done this without you and Orlando by my side. Thanks to my Dr. And a special #happymothersday to Shonna my nurse. I’m strong. #reachoutandbringlifeintotheworld Jru is a month today, and what a special day it is. ❤️ sorry if this offends anyone. I’ll be removing it shortly.

A video posted by Draya Michele (@drayamichele) on

Of course, there will always be people with something negative to say, but I was honestly left in awe of the clip and the reminder that so many women, as Michele stated, can reach out and bring life into the world. It’s a beautiful thing.

And it’s also a beautiful thing to see how well Michele’s body is adjusting after giving birth to her second child (she has a son named Kniko and Orlando Scandrick has twin girls Taylor and Tatiana). She hopped right back in the gym and looks great.

Arm day …….. I’m cut, thanks @gregg_miele @heartandhustlegym HEART & HUSTLE

A photo posted by Draya Michele (@drayamichele) on

Me, after training. Caffeine depleted. Still relatively happy tho. Photo : @jenloweryphoto

A photo posted by Draya Michele (@drayamichele) on

😩🙌🏽🏆

A video posted by Draya Michele (@drayamichele) on

Happy belated Mother’s Day to the moms out there, including Michele. And kudos to her for getting back in fighting shape so soon. Looking, good!

Comedian GloZell Green Gets Serious About Infertility, Surrogacy And Having A Baby At 43

May 2nd, 2016 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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YouTube/Refinery29

YouTube/Refinery29

You either love GloZell Green’s eccentric act or you side-eye it all. But a recent interview with Refinery29 is exposing a different, vulnerable side of Green that is making everyone pay attention, and is also making the colorful comedian all the more relatable.

She spoke with the publication about infertility for National Infertility Week (which was last week, from April 24-30) and explained that while she was making people laugh in front of the camera, for the last few years, she was going through a painful fertility journey behind the camera. As Green, who is married, pointed out, she decided to put her quest for motherhood on overdrive at the age of 39, and her doctors told her that it was pretty much too late for her.

“My mom told me, ‘Make sure you do everything you want to do before you have kids,'” Green told Refinery29. “So that’s what I was doing. But biologically, the body is just like, well, you should have done it. And all the doctors that I went to, except for the last one, made me feel like I was just so old. You know, ‘You should have frozen your eggs at 20.’ Well, who’s thinking about that at 20?”

But Green didn’t give up. She pursued all of her options before eventually being blessed to have a surrogate offer to help, going that route because she had endometriosis and her uterine lining was thin. (Note: She did share that the surrogate is a White woman, which some people gave her flack over. But as she put it, “when you get to that point, you don’t care. You’re just happy that someone is willing to do be [sic] your surrogate, because it’s very dangerous.”)

“I started looking into this at 39, and I’m 43, and it’s just now happening,” Green said. “The only procedure I had done was the egg retrieval, and I had that done six times. I wasn’t going to carry the child myself, so I didn’t have to do any other procedures. It took three years from talking about it, to meeting with Wendie Wilson-Miller from Gifted Journeys Surrogacy, to finding the right doctor, to doing the egg retrieval, and finding the right surrogate.”

The baby, a girl, is set to be born in August, and in the meantime, Green is trying not to stress herself, or her surrogate out. She often finds herself worried when her surrogate travels, but she doesn’t want to keep the woman from doing what she wants and needs to for herself, in order for her pregnancy to be an easy and happy one.

As she waits, she’s also looking forward to hopefully having another child (“I have a few more eggs left that passed the test”) and continuing with sharing her story, so that other women know they’re not alone. And also so other women know that they shouldn’t let the ups and downs of such a painful process stop them from seeing it through.

“Don’t stop. It can get discouraging — Oh, it didn’t work or Oh, I lost the baby or I can’t do this again. You can. And when you get the kid, you’ll be happy that you did. But it’s a very painful process for a lot of people. You just have to figure out how it’s gonna get done.”

Popular Yeast Infection Drug Linked To Miscarriages

April 28th, 2016 - By Jazmine Denise Rogers
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Popular Yeast Infection Drug Linked To Miscarriages

Corbis Images, Rubberball.com

Expectant moms are being warned by the United States Food and Drug Administration to steer clear of a popular drug used to treat yeast infections.

According to the FDA, data that has recently been made available suggests that there is a link between oral use of fluconazole (brand name Diflucan) by pregnant women and miscarriages. The data cited by the FDA is based on a Danish study, which was conducted by researchers who examined the medical records of women who took the drug during the initial 22 weeks of pregnancy. Researchers found that these women faced a higher risk of miscarriage when compared to moms who did not.

“Healthcare professionals should be aware that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines recommend only using topical antifungal products to treat pregnant women with vulvovaginal yeast infections, including for longer periods than usual if these infections persist or recur,” the agency warned. “Patients who are pregnant or actively trying to get pregnant should talk to their healthcare professionals about alternative treatment options for yeast infections.”

The Food and Drug Administration is currently looking into fluconazole, and it’s possible link to miscarriages. In the meantime, doctors are advised to use caution when treating expectant moms for yeast infections.

H/t Elle

Hilarious Thoughts All Women Have When They Realize They’re Pregnant

April 20th, 2016 - By Julia Austin
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Corbis

Corbis

Even women who want to become pregnant and have been trying with their partners for ages are never quite prepared to see that little positive symbol on that little pink stick. It isn’t until you know you’re pregnant that the concept of having a living human being growing inside of you kicks in. It isn’t until you’re pregnant that the reality hits that you will never only be responsible for yourself, again. Even when that kid is 40, he/she will still keep you up at night. Speaking of which, will your baby be a he or a she?! Your baby might have been some ethereal being in your head until you got that positive test result. As you can see, discovering you’re pregnant can bring up all sorts of thoughts. You can’t be held responsible for what runs through your head at that life changing moment. So here are 15 hilarious and terrifying thoughts women have when they discover they’re pregnant.

Fertility Myths We Can All Stop Believing

April 18th, 2016 - By Meg Butler
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Image Source: Tumblr

Image Source: Tumblr

When it comes to fertility myths, there are a lot of stories out there. Girlfriends, grandmothers, and well-meaning co-workers all seem to have something to say when it comes to the subject of pregnancy. They tried it, they think you should try it, and they believe that you should try it much sooner than later. You know, before it’s allegedly too late.

And sometimes, pregnancy myths stick around for so long that even doctors think that they’re true. So how are you supposed to separate the fact from the fiction? Oh, the struggle.

We’ve rounded up some of the most common fertility myths out there and gotten down to the truth of the matter. And even baby experts might be surprised at the pregnancy facts that we all thought were true but turned out not to be — at least not according to all of the research and findings on the subject.

#FitCouple And Former Track Stars Go The Distance For Their Child In Maternity Shoot

April 11th, 2016 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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While some people celebrate the impending arrival of their first child by having your everyday photo shoot (You know: man kisses belly, woman holds belly while smiling, couple embrace belly while smiling at one another, and so on and so forth), Kristina and Sam Sesay decided to return to the place they love almost as much as each other. The track.

The Maryland couple who’ve been Mr. and Mrs. for three years decided to celebrate the birth of their first child, due June 18, by doing an impromptu maternity shoot on a track located at a high school in D.C. The photos caught many people’s attention after the couple’s photographer, Adedayo Kosoko, shared the images on his social media accounts. The pair can be seen running, holding a baton, sitting together on bleachers and doing a lot more in their creative images.

Sam, 32, and Kristina, 30, both say that track changed their lives. It clearly had an indelible impact on their future health and fitness. Both have continued to stay in great shape, with Kristina reportedly working as a Zumba instructor who, as you can see, still has abs despite being seven months pregnant.

And as for Sam, the founder of a non-profit organization called Game Plan that supports student athletes, the former NCAA Division I All-American track star told ABC News that track taught him a great deal that he will teach his own child (whose sex they didn’t share):

“Track has taught me so much and really prepared me for life. The pictures meant so much more than just pictures because all of the life lessons I learned through track, I’m now going to impart them to our child. Everything came full circle.”

He continued, “[Track] taught me simple things like you have to stay in your lane. You can’t look to your left and your right. You have to run your race and not worry about your competitors. Track taught me not to look back and focus on what’s ahead of you because the second you look back you’ll get sidetracked.

It also taught me how to deal with defeat. In life bad things happen, but just competing in sports, you really learn [to say], ‘I’m not going to be undefeated.'”

If only high school sports had not turned from fun to the bane of my existence, I would feel the same way…oh well.

But I’m loving this couple and their beautiful pictures. And are they not a gorgeous pair? That baby is going to be a stunner!

Check out more shots from their lovely photo shoot and get inspired to think outside the box for your own celebratory moments.


 


 


 


 


 

Putting Off Motherhood? Here Are 15 Ways To Stay In Your Pregnancy Prime Longer

April 1st, 2016 - By Meg Butler
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Image Source: Tumblr

Image Source: Tumblr

Once you reach a certain age, the “when are you going to have a baby” questions really start to pile up. And while you politely tell everyone to please stay out of your uterus, there are still some things to do to keep ready if you want to put off having a child until much later in life. Whether you’re waiting on the right career, Mr. Right, or “right when I feel like it,” it pays to keep track of your body’s fertility so that when you’re ready, it’s ready.

Whether you plan on conceiving at 20, 30, or 40, there are ways to keep your body at peak fertility longer. But while you’re adopting these lifestyle changes, make a visit to your doctor. They know more about your personal health history, your fertility age (which is different from your chronological age) and all of the personal factors that affect every woman’s baby making window.

Serious Question: Would You Use A Crowdfunding Site To Help Cover Costs For A Maternity Leave?

March 29th, 2016 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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Source: Shutterstock

Source: Shutterstock

It’s hard out here for moms-to-be. While most companies offer employees maternity leave for 12 weeks, that leave is not always guaranteed to be paid. And sometimes, the temporary cut in a woman’s salary when it is offered can be a significant one. Not to mention that most companies don’t have anything in place when it comes to paternity leave. So expecting couples or families with already growing broods are finding themselves worrying more and more about money during a time when they would like to be focused on their new child.

And that’s probably why thousands of women have decided to turn to crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe to ask people to help them cover expenses while they take a maternity leave from work.

You might think it sounds tacky, but for moms like 24-year-old mom-to-be, Nicole Ritchie out of Virginia, it’s necessary.

“You can save, plan, calculate, and hope for the best, but there is always that worry in the back of my head—will it be enough?” Ritchie told Self.com of the worries she has about trying to take care of a newborn, and cover regular expenses solely on her husband’s income for three months. Ritchie is a stylist at a salon where she doesn’t get anything substantial aside from a check. No insurance or benefits are coming her way, so you know they weren’t going to offer her anything during her leave.

“I’ve read a lot of articles where people ridicule those who seek crowdfunding for maternity leave,” Ritchie told Self. “They say things like, ‘If you can’t afford to have a baby, then don’t have one.’ It’s frustrating to read these things, because it is easy for some to say. But most people in America don’t have the luxury to have a one income family anymore, which means it’s very hard for people to save, even with two incomes. Many mothers come across unexpected costs and are too afraid to take out a personal loan on things like having a child because of the high risk it runs for them.”

And as Self pointed out, those who have turned to crowdfunding sites say they wouldn’t have done so if it weren’t, for example, for medical bills, credit problems and mortgage payments looming. Women like Ritchie say they’re not looking for a handout, but just a little help during the time they’ll be at home with their newborn. And while they set goals, those interviewed in Self‘s “Moms Are Turning To Crowdfunding Websites To Pay For Maternity Leave” piece said they were happy to obtain any support. And GoFundMe’s media director, Kelsea Little, told the site that they are glad to help make that happen.

“Growing a family should be a time of great joy, but the realities of paying for maternity leave are putting financial strain on many American families. We are incredibly proud to provide a platform that allows new parents to raise the funds necessary to spend precious moments with their children.”

It’s hard to say what one would or wouldn’t do without really being in such circumstances. But I will say that if people can get on GoFundMe and other crowdfunding sites to pay for getaways, the ingredients to cook random meals, and the money to fund a tired romantic comedy, it would be wrong to act as though asking for a little help to cover the expenses of a newborn and everyday responsibilities for a few months is ridiculous, because it’s not. And whether or not women like Ritchie make more than $1,000 or just $10 (which Self said she had received so far at the time of posting), a statement is surely being made about the parental leave in this country. A statement about the Good ol’ USA, the only country without mandated parental leave, and the changes that need to be made so that parents don’t feel guilty for asking for help, or go completely broke when they don’t.

But what do you think? Is it a good idea to go the crowdfunding route to cover some of the expenses that come with a newborn since the maternity leave struggle is real?

 

Could You And Your Partner’s Coffee-Drinking Habits Cause You To Miscarry?

March 28th, 2016 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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Shutterstock

Shutterstock

I know quite a few people who can’t seem to get through the day without some caffeine. And not just foods that have a little caffeine in them, but numerous cups of coffee, soda and tea. It’s pretty much the norm: You get a cup of coffee or a diet coke in the morning, and if you need to recharge, you keep pouring throughout the day. But it’s being suggested by a new study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility that not only can your coffee-drinking habits have an impact on your ability to carry a child full-term, but so can your partner’s.

The study had more than 500 couples working to have a baby track their daily behaviors for 12 months, including how much caffeine they were consuming, whether it was a cup of coffee, some tea, or a carbonated beverage.

It was found that of the 344 women who ended up getting pregnant, 98 miscarried. And while researchers did find some common issues (i.e., higher miscarriage rates were prevalent for women over 35), what was interesting was that they found women who consumed more than two caffeinated beverages each day around the time of conception and throughout the first seven weeks of pregnancy were more likely to miscarry. And even more intriguing was the finding that the excessive caffeine-drinking habits of their significant other had just as big of an impact on the loss of pregnancy.

According to Women’s Health, researchers didn’t have a real explanation yet as to why excessive caffeine consumption could be associated with miscarriages, but they did advise couples working on conceiving to drink no more than two caffeinated beverages each day. And if women with an itch for caffeine do get pregnant, they still need to stick to two caffeinated beverages at the very most. Another important suggestion was for women seeking to get pregnant to make sure they’re taking multivitamins with folic acid because those in the study who took it were less likely to have miscarriages.

Check out the study’s findings in full on the pre-pregnancy caffeine consumption of couples and the risk it could have on carrying a child to term via the National Institutes of Health website.