All Articles Tagged "population"

New York Census Numbers Challenged

March 31st, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Amsterdam News) — Census numbers released last Thursday for New York City have elected officials asking questions and challenging the results. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, New York City currently has 8.175 million people. However, City Hall estimated the number to be about 8.4 million.  The city’s Black population saw a 2 percent decrease while the white population grew 0.6 percent. Asians saw the highest spike in population, with a 13 percent increase, especially in Brooklyn. The Hispanic population grew by 8.1 percent.  Breaking the numbers down by borough, Staten Island’s population grew the most over the last 10 years with 5.6 percent, Manhattan grew 3.5 percent, the Bronx saw a 3.9 percent increase and Brooklyn grew by 1.5 percent.  Probably the most questionable numbers come from Queens, which only saw an increase in population of 0.1 percent in the last 10 years, equivalent to only 1,300 people.

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New York Census Numbers Challenged

March 31st, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Amsterdam News) — Census numbers released last Thursday for New York City have elected officials asking questions and challenging the results. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, New York City currently has 8.175 million people. However, City Hall estimated the number to be about 8.4 million.  The city’s Black population saw a 2 percent decrease while the white population grew 0.6 percent. Asians saw the highest spike in population, with a 13 percent increase, especially in Brooklyn. The Hispanic population grew by 8.1 percent.  Breaking the numbers down by borough, Staten Island’s population grew the most over the last 10 years with 5.6 percent, Manhattan grew 3.5 percent, the Bronx saw a 3.9 percent increase and Brooklyn grew by 1.5 percent.  Probably the most questionable numbers come from Queens, which only saw an increase in population of 0.1 percent in the last 10 years, equivalent to only 1,300 people.

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Chicago’s African-American Exodus

March 31st, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Medill News Service) — While Chicago’s black population plunged dramatically in the last 10 years, according to the 2010 Census, the black population in Cook and the surrounding counties fell at half the pace.  African-Americans accounted for about 90 percent of Chicago’s 200,000-person population drop over the past 10 years, but the drop in the number of blacks in the six-county metropolitan region was on par with decline in the overall population.  The black population decline in the city “was so dramatic,” said community analyst Rob Paral.  The city’s black population dropped by 17 percent over the period, compared with an overall drop of 7 percent, based on analysis by Medill Reports of recently released census data. The rate of decline of the black population in Cook and the surrounding counties was 9 percent.  Some blamed the drop in the city on an error in the 2010 Census, but others disagree.

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Chicago’s African-American Exodus

March 31st, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Medill News Service) — While Chicago’s black population plunged dramatically in the last 10 years, according to the 2010 Census, the black population in Cook and the surrounding counties fell at half the pace.  African-Americans accounted for about 90 percent of Chicago’s 200,000-person population drop over the past 10 years, but the drop in the number of blacks in the six-county metropolitan region was on par with decline in the overall population.  The black population decline in the city “was so dramatic,” said community analyst Rob Paral.  The city’s black population dropped by 17 percent over the period, compared with an overall drop of 7 percent, based on analysis by Medill Reports of recently released census data. The rate of decline of the black population in Cook and the surrounding counties was 9 percent.  Some blamed the drop in the city on an error in the 2010 Census, but others disagree.

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10 Most Segregated Cities in US

March 30th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Salon) — Decades after the end of Jim Crow, and three years after the election of America’s first black president, the United States remains a profoundly segregated country.  That reality has been reinforced by the release of Census Bureau data last week that shows black and white Americans still tend to live in their own neighborhoods, often far apart from each other. Segregation itself, the decennial census report indicates, is only decreasing slowly, although the dividing lines are shifting as middle-income blacks, Latinos and Asians move to once all-white suburbs — whereupon whites often move away, turning older suburbs into new, if less distressed, ghettos.

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10 Most Segregated Cities in US

March 30th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Salon) — Decades after the end of Jim Crow, and three years after the election of America’s first black president, the United States remains a profoundly segregated country.  That reality has been reinforced by the release of Census Bureau data last week that shows black and white Americans still tend to live in their own neighborhoods, often far apart from each other. Segregation itself, the decennial census report indicates, is only decreasing slowly, although the dividing lines are shifting as middle-income blacks, Latinos and Asians move to once all-white suburbs — whereupon whites often move away, turning older suburbs into new, if less distressed, ghettos.

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Blacks Leave New York as Asians Propel Growth

March 25th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Wall Street Journal) — New York City’s population grew to a high of 8,175,100 over the past decade, according to the U.S. Census count released Tuesday—but the 2.1% bump was still far smaller than officials had anticipated.  Asian and Hispanic populations spiked between 2000 and 2010, transforming the city’s racial landscape. But the number of black New Yorkers dropped 5%, the first dip in that group since 1860. There were fewer whites, as well.    Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other elected officials disputed the count. A 2009 federal survey of New York and the rest of the nation predicted the Census would reflect a 4.8% jump in the city’s population.  Queens, in particular, was a sore point for officials. The Census tally there showed the borough added a paltry 1,300 people.  “The Census says that we have added 166,000-odd people since the 2000 count, but we are concerned that there’s been a significant undercount,” the mayor said. “When three boroughs go up dramatically, and the two most populous boroughs don’t, something is wrong.”

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Story Behind Detroit’s Plummeting Population

March 25th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Time) — The news this week that Detroit’s population plunged more than 25% to just 714,000 in the last decade shouldn’t be surprising. The city’s collapse is as well-documented as it is astonishing – the population peaked at nearly 2 million in the 1950s, driven in part by a post-World War II auto industry boom now long gone.  Predictably, Detroit officials have vowed to challenge the Census Bureau’s report. “I don’t believe the number is accurate,” the mayor, Dave Bing, said in a hastily scheduled news conference Tuesday. Bing’s response is understandable.

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Drastic Decline in Detroit Population

March 23rd, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Wall Street Journal) — The population of Detroit has fallen back 100 years.  The flight of middle-class African-Americans to the suburbs fueled an exodus that cut Detroit’s population 25% in the past decade to 713,777, according to Census Bureau data released Tuesday. That’s the city’s lowest population level since the 1910 census, when automobile mass production was making Detroit Detroit.  The decline, the fastest in city history, shocked local officials, who had expected a number closer to 800,000. Mayor Dave Bing said the city would seek a recount.  “If we could go out and identify another 40,000 people that were missed, and it brings us over the threshold of 750,000, that would make a difference from what we can get from the federal and state government,” Mr. Bing said at a news conference Tuesday.  In all, the city lost more than 237,000 residents, including 185,000 blacks and about 41,000 whites. The Hispanic population ticked up by 1,500. Meanwhile, the black population in neighboring Macomb County more than tripled to 72,723, constituting 8.6% of the county’s population in 2010, compared with 2.7% a decade earlier. Oakland County’s African-American population rose 36% to 164,078.

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Expert: Housing Boom Drove D.C.’s Shifting Color Line

March 22nd, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Washington Examiner) — Many population  experts predict the District’s official demographic makeup, expected to be released by the Census Bureau this week, will show a marked increase in the city’s white population while blacks continue to decline. But some say that trend, largely driven by the real estate boom in the mid-2000s, may be slowing. In concert with the shift is the eastward movement of D.C.’s unofficial dividing line that separates the majority-white neighborhoods from the majority-black. That line 10 years ago used to roughly be along 16th Street Northwest, said Peter Tatian, senior research associate for the Urban Institute. Now it’s inching into Northeast D.C. as development and new housing have created emerging neighborhoods.

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