All Articles Tagged "natural hair"

“This is A Disaster” The Time President Obama Did Malia’s Hair

March 20th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Fab four. #ThrowbackThursday #TBT

A photo posted by First Lady Michelle Obama (@michelleobama) on

This story is ancient in pop culture news terms. But it’s new to me and just too adorable not to share. So here I am bringing it to you, on the off chance that it might have slipped under the radar for you too.

Remember back in 2012, when President Obama was running for re-election he and First Lady Michelle Obama were having dinner with voters? Well, President Obama being the charismatic dude that he is, he shared a very charming story about the time he had to style his eldest daughter’s hair.

My favorite story out of this is Malia, when she was 4, she had a little dance thing. Well, Michelle was gone that weekend so I’m taking her to ballet. And I get her in her little leotard and her little stuff. I did her hair, put it in a little bun.

We get to the dance studio and one of the mothers there right away comes up to Malia – she thinks she’s out of earshot of me and she says, ‘Sweetie, do you want me to redo your hair?’ And Malia who she’s 4 says, ‘Yes please, this is a disaster’ you know, she didn’t want to hurt daddy’s feelings.

I love this story because I’ll forget the week my mother was out of town visiting her brother, my uncle, in California. I remember it for basically one reason and one reason only. It was the first and last time my dad was left to style me and my sister’s hair for school that week.

The first day I naively thought that since my dad was go great at everything else he did with us, doing our hair would be the same. I was sadly mistaken. Not only does my father have large and heavy hands, he had absolutely no idea how to style our hair like our mother did.

But that didn’t stop him from putting up a good front. That morning before school he asked us what we wanted. I was about 8 and by this time I’d had a relaxer for a few years. And since it had been a while since I’d been to the shop, my hair was too old to be worn down. So I told him I wanted a ponytail.

My father’s hands trying to scoop up the strands of my hair felt like mallets clunking against my scalp. It was anything but pleasant. And on Tuesday, I told him I’d do my own hair. My sister, who is just under two years younger than me, whose hair wasn’t relaxed, just had to suffer until my mom came back home.

Needless to say, after a week of me attempting to protect my scalp and my father struggling with my sister’s three staple braids, we were looking rough…real rough when we picked my mom up from the airport.

We all look back on that week and laugh. Those are some pretty fond memories, even if it was less than amusing when I was going to school looking crazy.

Did your father ever have to do your hair for some reason? How did he do?

Spring Forward With These Natural Hairstyles For The Workplace

March 17th, 2015 - By Tanvier Peart
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Black woman with natural hair in workplace/business office

Shutterstock

With the weather starting to get a little warmer, ladies who are “team natural” can show off their mane outside of those winter protective styles. Take a look at these natural springtime hairstyle ideas you can rock around the workplace.

Related read Natural Hair Companies That Would Love Your Support

Rejoice! Soft & Beautiful Botanicals Is Back

March 10th, 2015 - By Brande Victorian
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Soft & Beautiful BotanicalsWe know you know you the name, but you might not immediately recognize the revamped look of one of our favorite tried and true hair product lines, Soft & Beautiful Botanicals. The premium — yet affordable — hair care brand has recently been brought back to life by Strength of Nature, the same manufacturer responsible for Beautiful Textures, African Pride, and our beloved Esasta QP, and they’ve added some amazing new products to the Soft & Beautiful line to keep your hair just that, with natural ingredients.

SNBB Coconut OilFans of the line now have a full line of products to choose from, all with renewed formulas. This includes Soft & Beautiful Botanicals Moisturizing Shampoo, Moisturizing Lotion, Leave-in Conditioner, Deep Conditioning Repair Masque, Crème Moisturizer and Shea Butter Edges for moisturizing edge control. There’s also a Sensitive Scalp Relaxer System and Texturizer Relaxer System for both regular and coarse hair and the Reversible Straightening Texture Manageability System™ that allows women to go from curly to straight and back again without chemicals in four simple steps.

Additionally, Soft & Beautiful Botanicals is also debuting three Ultra Nourishing® Oils which moisturize, detangle and provide shine, while also serving as effective heat protectants and providing frizz control. The three varieties – Tea Tree, Coconut, and Olive Oil – are all available for approximately $5.00 per bottle, and as a consumer who tried the Tea Tree and Coconut options this past weekend (more details on that to come) I can assure you they are worth every penny. And, as an added bonus, the oils can also be used to moisturize dry skin and nourish your nails, which is exactly what we all need with Spring and Summer rapidly approaching.SNBB Tea Tree Oil

“We are so excited to introduce Soft & Beautiful Botanicals to a new generation of beautiful, health-minded women,” said Charlene Dance, global marketing director for Strength of Nature Global, LLC in a news release. “We have breathed new life into a collection that not only offers stunning results for women of any texture, but enables them to develop healthier and stronger hair via the application of all natural, ultra-nourishing and premium ingredients – not harsh chemicals.”

The new and improved Soft & Beautiful Botanicals line will be available beginning this month at neighborhood beauty stores nationwide, including Sally Beauty Supply, for less than $10 per item.  For further information, visit softandbeautifulhair.com and of course follow Soft & Beautiful Botanicals on Twitter at @SONSoftBeauty and on Instagram at @SoSoftBeautiful.

 

 

“I Want To Embrace My Full Self” Willow Smith Says She Wants Locs In New CR Fashion Book Spread

March 4th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Willow Smith Says She Wants Locs In New CR Fashion Book Spread

Source: CR Fashion Book

By now, surely you’ve noticed that Willow is not your average 14-year-old. And while most were walking around with words plastered across our booty at that age, Willow Smith is slaying a full fashion spread in CR Fashion Book. 

And while Willow gets to wear designer duds by Emilio Pucci, like us, she still has yet to determine a signature style…if she will ever settle on just one.

For now: “I think my look changes all of the time. And right now, it’s a bit more messy, kind of grungy.” 

More than style though, Willow is working on herself. She told the publication: “I just want to have dreads. I want to embrace my full self, as natural as I can be.” 

The issue featuring the youngest Smith child will hit newsstands tomorrow. But in the meantime, check out the stunning images from the shoot.

Willow Smith Says She Wants Locs In New CR Fashion Book Spread

Source: CR Fashion Book

Willow Smith Says She Wants Locs In New CR Fashion Book Spread

Source: CR Fashion Book

Support Your Sister: Black Women Come To Zendaya’s Defense

February 25th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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black women come to zendaya's defense feat

Though Giuliana Rancic’s apology last night seemed sincere and heartfelt to me, there are still some who are refusing to accept it. But more importantly, other Black women in the limelight who stepping forward to show their support and solidarity.

First, there was fellow loced sister Selma director Ava DuVernay, who wrote this under Zendaya’s initial open letter.

Then “Scandal” actress Kerry Washington commended Zendaya on her open letter to Giuliana.

And finally, Solange spoke about the ways in which the show had been speaking about the fro on the red carpets for years. And she even referenced the time In Touch Weekly compared her hair to a dog. That didn’t go unnoticed. In true Solange fashion, she provided the perfect response for it.

India Arie even released a “Songversation” about this whole thing. See what she said. 


I wanted to jump in and defend Zendaya – but she’s doing that BEAUTIFULLY  herself.

VERY. WELL.  DONE.  It’s a powerful thing to be a TEENAGER in the public eye, and feel empowered to speak up in your own defense. STUNNING!

In my opinion, Entitlement in and of itself, BLINDS people to that very entitlement …  THUS allowing the behavior exhibited.

I’m not calling Giuliana Rancic a RACIST, .. but OF COURSE  it has to do with RACE.   To say it has “Nothing to do with race” .. THAT’S why people get mad.

But lets remember HOW difficult it is for a person of Gullianna Ranci’s social context to really UNDERSTAND how we see race in this issue. How race is a pervasive ISSUE in the entertainment industries as a whole.

We  need more more compassion in this world. Period

So I’m not MAD at Giuliana Rancic I’m SAD at her.  I’m Sad that things LIKE THIS keep happening.

Make It Right: Giuliana Rancic Issues On Air Apology To Zendaya Coleman

February 24th, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Source: E!

Source: E!

Giuliana Rancic was catching all kind of hell today once people learned about the remarks she made about the faux locs Zendaya Coleman wore to the Oscars. It’s been one of the top stories of the day; but in case you missed it, during “Fashion Police” Rancic said that Zendaya looked like she smelled of patchouli and weed. And obviously, with all the stereotypes, misconception and general ignorance surrounding Black hair and natural hair specifically, that wasn’t the right thing to say.

And though Rancic apologized earlier today, on Twitter, stating that her remark was more about a Bohemian lifestyle than it was about race, apparently she, the network and even Kelly Osbourne felt she needed to clarify and expound on that apology live, on air.

Here’s what she had to say:

“I’d really like to address something that’s weighing really heavy on my heart. I want to apologize for a comment that I made on last night’s Fashion Police about Zendaya‘s hair. 

As you know, Fashion Police is a show that pokes fun at celebrities in good spirit, but I do realize that something I said last night did cross the line.

I just want everyone to know that I didn’t intend to hurt anybody, but I learned it’s not my intent that matters. It’s the result. And the result is people are offended, including Zendaya. And that is not OK. 

Therefore, I want to say to Zendaya, and anyone else out there that I hurt, that I’m so sincerely sorry. This really has been a learning experience for me. I learned a lot today and this incident has taught me to be a lot more aware of cliches and stereotypes, how much damage they can do. And that I am responsible, as we all are, to not perpetuate them further. Thank you for listening.”

You can watch Rancic’s remarks in their entirety in the video below.

Celeb Hairstylist Felicia Leatherwood On Working With Ava DuVernay, Natural Hair On The Red Carpet And Naturalistas Abroad

February 22nd, 2015 - By Victoria Uwumarogie
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Felicia Leatherwood is one busy woman. The celebrity hairstylist, who is based out of LA, stays with heads in her chair. “It gets so crazy!” she tells me, and she’s not kidding. Leatherwood is often so busy perfecting coifs for her clientele that she was actually doing hair while we were having our interview. But that’s what happens when your work goes viral and you’re the go-to hair guru for the likes of naturalistas like Ava DuVernay, Teyonah Parris and Jill Scott. We chatted about how she linked up with DuVernay, what magic she’ll work on the director’s hair for today’s Oscars, and how having locs and natural hair in general on the red carpet impacts women trying to embrace their hair abroad. Leatherwood is taking part in the fourth annual Natural Hair Academy expo in Paris, which takes places on March 21. She’s looking to teach everyone, from celebrities to everyday women with limited access to products and natural hair knowledge, how to love and manage their hair.

How She Connected With Ava DuVernay

There’s a young lady named Teyonah Parris. I did her hair a couple years ago when she was on the SAG Awards red carpet. It was a natural hairstyle. It went viral and people knew me from doing Jill Scott, but they really started seeing what else I could do with that hairstyle. It was a sculpted updo. Ava admired that and we met at a dinner, and she was like, “Oh my God, you’re Felicia! I want you to do my hair.” I said “sure.” We were introduced by Afrobella. That’s how it came about. But she knew me from my work with Teyonnah, basically.

What She Has Planned For Ava On Oscar Sunday

That’s a good question. I make this stuff up as I go. I don’t always have a plan for the hair. I kind of just let my ancestors guide my fingers and my creativity and just come up with stuff. I love doing natural hair, so for me, it’s just about being creative and letting that part of me come out when I’m working the hair. It’s something that just kind of happens.

What Seeing Natural Hair On The Red Carpet Means To Her

At the end of the day, I want people to be comfortable with whatever they’re wearing. If it’s natural, I want them to love it. If it’s straight, love it. You gotta just own your hair. But the opportunity I get as a hairstylist is to create something based on what’s already beautiful about you, but just put more of that out there. I’m proud to be a part of that process. I love working with Ava. I have a lot of fun because she’s not just natural, she has locs. You don’t often get a chance to see locs showcased in a way where people start taking notice and saying, “Wow, I might want my hair locked as well!” Locs are becoming a big thing right now, which is really interesting. But people like Ava, in being able to do her hair and show how beautiful locs can be, and look, and how professional and glamorous they are–it’s making people rethink what locs originally were.

The Number One Hair Question She Always Gets

It’s all about moisture. That’s the biggest thing. A lot of people don’t know what their hair is supposed to feel like. Some people’s hair is supposed to feel dry. That’s what it is. You can soften it when it’s wet, but once it’s dry…you have to understand our lineage: Who we are as a people, African people, the region in which we originated is hot. If you have straight hair in heat that’s like 105, 108, 109 degree weather, your hair would burn off. They had to have this hair in order to protect themselves. We’re not used to that because things have changed a lot for us. We think we need to have everybody else’s hair. You need to have your own hair and make sure you’re treating that the best possible way. The best way to treat your hair is to put things in your body that help the hair survive and grow and be strong. The best way you can treat your hair is to not be stressed out. Yoga helps the hair to grow! All the oxygen that gets to flow in the body is what gets the blood to flow to stimulate more hair growth. Drinking water is important. And I think a lot of times, people talk about their hair being dry, and I think it’s because they don’t have all those elements together. Some people are supposed to naturally have dry hair depending on their texture or curl. Other people? You can always put something on it. But a lot of times, I have women who have tried every product under the sun and still have dry hair. And when I feel their hair, it’s the kind of dry that’s supposed to be natural. It’s not the kind of dry that I feel like, “Okay, something is wrong here.” I know what that feels like. There’s a way that your hair should feel naturally that I think women need to be introduced to.

On Traveling Around The World Teaching About Natural Hair

What I do is I travel around and do events like the Natural Hair Academy, and I show women what their hair is supposed to feel like. I let them know that it’s okay where it’s at right now. There’s nothing wrong with your hair.

How She Got Involved With The Natural Hair Academy

About four years ago, women in Europe started asking me to conduct workshops. So I decided to go overseas and bring the knowledge we have here, there in person. I started in London, and then Chimole [Williams], who I’ve been working with for a while, and I like her a lot, she introduced me to the Paris group and said “Hey, they need your help over here. Women are asking about you over in Paris. Would you be interested?” And I said “sure.”

We have access to a lot here in the States. So when you start traveling outside of the States, it’s not the same thing. I try to take my knowledge to other places, and be there firsthand so people can come and consult with me and find out about their hair. I teach them product knowledge. I teach them which products are the best for their texture of curl. And I love going over to Europe and feeding that market. The women there, they’re more engaged and more appreciative of the fact that I traveled. They show up in droves. The Natural Hair Academy is very successful, and every year it has been successful. It’s grown leaps and bounds from the first time I ever worked with them.

The Lack Of Access To Products For Black Naturalistas Abroad

That’s the problem. Getting these products out to these women in other places. I go to Africa, I go to Europe, and they just don’t have access. Brazil does not allow our products to come over into their country. There are a few brands that have gotten there, but it’s not easy. You might have women in Brazil asking me how they get the products that I mention. There are people in the Caribbean trying to get a hold of products. So the natural movement is slowly growing, but it’s not as dominant as it is here for us. You can walk up the street and get what you need here, but they go through a lot. Especially when you even talk about Africa. Ordering? By the time it goes through customs and everything gets filled out, it’s like, “Wow.” Their money is spent and they don’t always get what they ask for. I’ve been going back and forth there as well. It’s a whole different thing, including in Nigeria. I’ll be there in May to train some of the stylists there about natural hair.

What She Wants Frustrated New Naturalistas To Know

Women who are struggling and having a hard time, there are three things they need to do: If they’re going to follow someone on YouTube, they should follow someone who has a texture like theirs! You have to. If you’re looking at a woman like Tracee Ellis Ross’s hair and wanting that, but your texture is more like Lupita’s hair, that’s not reasonable. You’re defeating your purpose. Both those women have gorgeous hair, but you need to follow someone whose hair is more on the level of what you have.

The other thing that they need to do is find out where the next natural hair show or meetup is in their town and go to those meetups. You can connect with women who definitely have hair that’s similar. Find out where they go and who does their hair and see if there’s a natural hairstylist in the area that can help assist someone who’s transitioning.

And they need to have a friend who is natural. And to tell them that you need support because you’re trying to do this thing but you just don’t know what to do and you’re having a hard time and you’re ready to give up. If you let somebody know that before doing it, they will help you, because they want you to hang in there. Being natural for a lot of women is not only about, “Oh I’m wearing my hair natural.” It’s also representing that I’m accepting who I really am and I’m loving it. That’s important for any woman of any shade or color to get–love for self. We grew up with a lot of self-doubt and self-esteem issues from some childhood and teenage years. So to become a woman and finally be in a position to say, “I’m feeling beautiful about what I have” is a big, big deal. So I encourage them to talk to someone who has done the journey and has been successful with it.

#StruggleDiaries: Hair Woes All Black Girls Understand

February 13th, 2015 - By Meg Butler
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Whether it’s fried, dyed or laid to the side, there are just some hair struggles every Black girl under the sun can understand — Like these.

Image Source: Tumblr

Image Source: Tumblr

When The Relaxer Is In Too Long

And you have to decide between passing out and being silky smooth.

“I Don’t Really Consider My Hair To Be Controversial” Meteorologist Fired Because Of Her Natural Hair

January 23rd, 2015 - By Madame Noire
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Meteorologist Fired

Twitter

 

From BlackVoices

Rhonda Lee had long been told that she needed to make her natural hair “more pleasing to a wider audience,” she told HuffPost Live on Thursday, but she never expected her hair style to actually compromise her job.

Lee, an African American woman who currently works as a meteorologist for WeatherNation TV, recalled how comments she made in response to Internet vitriol targeting her hair ultimately led to her being fired by her former network.

“There really does come a breaking point when either you’re going to accept me as I am and how I do my job, or you’re not,” she explained. “Apparently my station of KTBS chose not, and I was quickly fired for… two different comments that got me in trouble, both times defending being black in general.”

Read more Rhonda Lee’s termination at BlackVoices.com

Stop Hating Your Hair: Dove Wants You To #LoveYourCurls

January 21st, 2015 - By Veronica Wells
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Source: YouTube

Source: YouTube

It seems that no one taught us to dislike or even despise our curly or kinky hair. It seems that from the moment we become aware of our hair, we’re trying to correct it. In all actuality, someone did teach us to dislike it. From the women who are lauded as beautiful in magazines, on television screens, watching our mothers sit for hours getting relaxers applied. Having relaxers applied to our own heads before we even fully understood what was going on–the message that straight hair is better has been and continues to be all around us.

And while we can certainly relate as Black women, this issue is not unique to us. Girls and women, of all races and ethnicities, who don’t have naturally straight hair are dealing with these feelings.

So it should really come as no surprise that our daughters, nieces, little cousins and other young girls in our lives don’t hold their hair in high regard. According to a recent commercial, created by Dove only 4 out of 10 young girls think their curly hair is beautiful.

What can help increase that number? Surrounding the curly/kinky-haired little girls in our lives with people who celebrate the texture of their hair. And while you’re at it, it wouldn’t hurt to start examining how you feel about your own tresses.

This is not news to us. The “natural hair movement” has been attempting to do just that for some time now.

And Dove is making the same statement–with a more multicultural approach. We’ll certainly let them be inspired by our brilliance if it means curly haired little ones–and some older ones–can feel better about the hair on their heads.

Take a look at Dove’s #LoveYourCurls commercial in the video below.