All Articles Tagged "medical school"

Where Are All of the Black Doctors? Report Shows Declining Number of African American Medical Students

March 5th, 2013 - By CAP
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A recent article on the American Medical News website focuses on the decrease in African-American male applicants, however after reviewing the results of a report conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) it is noticeable that African-American females medical students have issues of their own.

The report revealed that the number of black male applicants proportionate to all medical school applicants decreased from 2.6 percent to 2.5 percent from 2002 to 2011, while both Asian and Hispanic male medical school applicants increased.

Black female students are having very similar issues. Not only did the proportion of African-American females medical school applicants drop from 5.2 percent to 4.8 percentage, but the proportion of matriculates went from 4.5 percent to 3.8 percent. Although, in 2011 63 percent of new black MDs were women, so although the drops in numbers are a concern, black females still represent the largest number of black medical students and doctors.

These numbers create concern for the black community. The shortage in black physicians can make access to healthcare even more challenging for low-income minorities, since many black medical students make a commitment to serve these neighborhoods; 55 percent say they plan to do so. Also, the AAMC projects that by 2025 there will be a shortage of 130,000 doctors of all races and backgrounds. Rahn K. Bailey, MD, president of the National Medical Association, which promotes the interests of African-American physicians and patients says, “Society does better with balance all the way around… We need everybody. We need all hands on deck.”

So if you’re are wondering what to encourage your child to be when he grows up, a doctor should be at the top of the list.

Downward Trend: Less Black Men Applying To Become Doctors

March 5th, 2013 - By madamenoire
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Credit: Shutterstock

From The Grio

When Vince Wilson, 44, was in his early 20s, he considered being a doctor, yet his own insecurities held him back.

“The bottom line is, I never thought I was smart enough,” he says.

Instead, he focused his interest on other fields in medicine, becoming an x-ray technician, an EMT, a certified nursing assistant and an Army and Air Force healthcare technician.

“I always had the impression that [only] the kids who were superior in math and science became doctors,” he says. Despite having good academic preparation, he adds that he didn’t think that his self-described “average” grades qualified.

Read more at TheGrio.com.

New York State Looking To Check Caribbean Medical Schools

December 23rd, 2010 - By TheEditor
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by R. Asmerom

Medical school is not an easy venture for any aspiring doctor. Not only is it a tasking profession but one which is extremely competitive. So competitive that many American medical students go overseas to the Caribbean to take advantage of programs like the one offered by Ross University in Dominica.

According to the New York Times, however, that education funnel is under threat. As it stands today, many of those Caribbean based programs promise their students that they’d be able to do their third and fourth year trainings at New York state hospitals, but it appears that New York State medical schools are now campaigning to end the setup by which Caribbean schools use New York state as extensions of their campus. According to the Times, “New York has been particularly affected by the influx because it trains more medical students and residents — fledgling doctors who have just graduated from medical school — than any other state. The New York medical school deans say that they want to expand their own enrollment to fill the looming shortage, but that their ability to do so is impeded by competition with the Caribbean schools for clinical training slots in New York hospitals.”

The U.S. has a shortage of doctors and more than a quarter of the residents in United States hospitals are trained outside of the country. School officials from the Caribbean schools are saying that the opportunity to help meet this demand and tackle the doctor shortage should be embraced. New York medical schools are standing by the edict of the American Medical Association which contends that “the core clinical curriculum of a foreign medical school should be provided by that school and that U.S. hospitals should not provide substitute core clinical experience.”

Medical Schools Use Outreach Programs To Make Student Bodies More Diverse

June 9th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(The Washington Post) — When D’Onior Felton was growing up in the Mississippi Delta, she thought about becoming a public health worker. She volunteered at a local health center to help the elderly. A few days after graduating from high school in 2000, she joined the Navy and trained as a surgical technician. When D’Onior Felton was growing up in the Mississippi Delta, she thought about becoming a public health worker. She volunteered at a local health center to help the elderly. A few days after graduating from high school in 2000, she joined the Navy and trained as a surgical technician.

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