All Articles Tagged "carols daughter"

L’Oreal USA Purchases Carol’s Daughter To Reach The Multicultural Market

October 20th, 2014 - By Tonya Garcia
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Source: Facebook

Source: Facebook

L’Oreal USA announced today that it has purchased beauty company Carol’s Daughter, which will help the company reach a diverse consumer base.

“Carol’s Daughter possesses an expertise in the multi-cultural consumer segment, a rapidly expanding market that represents an important growth opportunity in the beauty industry,” said Frederic Roze, president and CEO of L’Oreal USA. “This acquisition will enable L’Oreal USA to build a new dedicated multi-cultural beauty division as part of our Consumer Products business, and strengthen the company’s position in this dynamic market.”

Carol’s Daughter, which was founded in 1993 by Lisa Price, will continue with its current leadership team, based out of its New York City headquarters.

“L’Oreal has a proven track record of helping established companies achieve their full potential while staying true to the core of the brand and they have an understanding of the future of multi-cultural beauty. I could not be more proud to begin this next chapter of the Carol’s Daughter brand with them,” said Price in a statement.

In May, Carol’s Daughter announced the closing of five store locations as part of a bankruptcy reorganization. Many at the time questioned the financial health of the company. Price addressed those questions directly in a Facebook post.

“It is important to set the record straight. Carol’s Daughter is still going strong after twenty-one years and the future has never looked brighter. As part of our increased focus on new retail channels, we have decided to close five of our stores. This was portrayed as if we are having some challenges, but nothing could be further from the truth,” she wrote at the time.

“The nationwide Target launch this past March is an opportunity that very few companies receive. I am proud of that. I am also proud and blessed to have valuable partners, like HSN, Ulta and Sephora inside JC Penney. These partnerships have enabled me to distribute Carol’s Daughter in over 2,500 stores and on direct TV which is far beyond the reach of my living room in Brooklyn,” the letter continued.

Today’s sale is subject to the final regulatory approvals. Other financial details are undisclosed.

Coincidentally, check out today’s MN Bosses #QOTD, care of Lisa Price. 

via The Street Insider

Carol’s Daughter Isn’t The Only Brand Out There: Natural Hair Companies That Would Love Your Support

April 25th, 2014 - By Tanvier Peart
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Source: Facebook

Source: Facebook

The community is still talking about the recent news of Carol’s Daughter bankruptcy. Blindsiding lovers of the natural hair brand, people are scratching their heads over what could’ve happened. While many of these questions won’t be answered, rest assured you can still get all of your favorite Carol’s Daughter products.

While you’ll still want to spend your dollars with Carol’s Daughter, it’s important to highlight other small natural hair brands you might want to consider for your regimen. Now’s a good time to think about throwing your support behind them as well.

Who will you use?

[Update] Carol’s Daughter Closes 5 Of 7 Stores In Bankruptcy Process

April 25th, 2014 - By Jazmine Denise Rogers
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Carol's Daughter companies file for bankruptcy after shutting down all but two of its seven store locations.

Source: Facebook

Companies affiliated with popular cosmetics supplier Carol’s Daughter filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection yesterday, The Wall Street Journal reports. The filing is in connection to the beauty brand’s efforts to close most of its stores.

The petition was filed with the Manhattan bankruptcy courts by CD Stores LLC, formerly known as Carol’s Daughter Stores LLC—in addition to the individual companies behind Carol’s Daughter stores. In the filing, CD Stores, which is 100% owned by parent company Carol’s Daughter Holdings LLC, reported both debts and assets in the $1 to $10 million bracket.

In the court documents, which were filed by the company’s CFO John D. Elmer, it’s revealed that the brand’s physical stores have shown to be unprofitable since 2010. Prior to the filing, the company shut down all except two of its seven store locations and laid off 29 of its 42 store employees.

According to the filing, Carol’s Daughter Holdings LLC hopes that filing for chapter 11 will help the company to “reorganize and consolidate” its operations. The company continues to sell its products from its Harlem and Brooklyn stores, the Carol’s Daughter website and more than 2,000 other retail stores across the nation.

“Today’s filing in no way reflects the parent company’s healthy financial situation, and is a part of its plan to grow the brand through national retail outlets,” said Carol’s Daughter CEO Richard Dantas in an emailed statement.

Are you a fan of their products?

Earlier today, a rep from the company issued this statement, attempting to clarify that Price did not file bankruptcy. Here’s what they said:

“We are happy to report that Carol’s Daughter did not file for bankruptcy.  To focus more attention on our third party retailers we made a decision to close five of our seven free-standing retail stores through a bankruptcy process. Our products will continue to be in over 2,000 independent retail outlets nationwide with more exciting launches to come that we can’t wait to share with you.”

 

 

Monday’s Madame: Diane Da Costa, Founder Of SimpleeBEAUTIFUL

October 14th, 2013 - By Lauren R.D. Fox
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Monday’s Madame is a new column on MadameNoire that highlights inspirational women who are doing great things in black communities around the world. If you would like to submit an inspirational woman for consideration, please send her name, age, location, photo, and a blurb about the work she’s doing to editors@madamenoire.com.

Diane Da CostaMonday’s Madame: Diane Da Costa

Age: 50

Location: White Plains, NY

Why she inspires us: Diane Da Costa is a curly textured expert and author of the 2004 book, Textured Tresses, The Ultimate Guide to Maintaining and Styling Natural Hair. Diane’s philosophy is simply, “Textured hair is gorgeous hair!”

With over 25 years in the beauty business, Ms. Da Costa has brought innovative curly styles to the forefront of today’s multi-textured hair movement. Diane’s cutting edge styles have graced the pages of The New York Times, Ebony, Essence British Elle, French Vogue, Heart & Soul, The Source, In Style, Latina.com, O Magazine, Rolling Stone, Sophisticates Black Hair, Vibe, and UPTOWN magazines.

Diane added proprietor to her resume when she opened Dyaspora Salon Spa, the first Aveda Concept salon in New York City, which was the leading textured hair care salon and spa in New York City during the 1990’s. Diane is currently the owner and creative director of SimpleeBEAUTIFUL, a luxury beauty product, hairstyling, and accessory boutique in Westchester, NY. SimpleeBEAUTIFUL Westchester offers clients an opportunity to get expert advice, test, and make informed decisions about selecting products that will achieve the best look, while cultivating healthy hair. The boutique offers a wide range of botanical and organic hair and body products, and is the first boutique to exclusively carry Carol’s Daughter products.

In 2012, Da Costa was named Brand Stylist for Carol’s Daughter and was part of the expert panel behind the Carol’s Daughter Transition Me Beautiful Contest. In this role she develops content for the Carol’s Daughter Transitioning Movement website, devoted to supporting the transitioning lifestyle and helping women of color maintain glamorous and healthy hair.

Follow Her: @DDaCostaBeauty

Facebook Her: https://www.facebook.com/SimpleeBEAUTIFUL2

Check out her website at: http://www.simpleebeautiful.com/

Carol’s Daughter’s Lisa Price On Business: “One Of The Mistakes I’ve Definitely Seen Women Make Is Crying”

October 14th, 2013 - By Tonya Garcia
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via @PeaceNLoveLisa

via @PeaceNLoveLisa

The New York Times commemorated the 250 Corner Office interviews featured in its Business section by taking a closer look at the women at the top. Adam Bryant conducted follow up interviews with four women CEOs to get their take on leadership, women (and men) in the workplace, and how we can better equip women for high-ranking positions.

One of the women included is Lisa Price, the founder and president of Carol’s Daughter. The 20-year-old company has thousands upon thousands of devotees who turn to the company for hair and skincare products. But for Price, this is big business and she has some suggestions for how women can join her in corporate success.

On being a leader:

I used to sit at the table but not necessarily at the head of the table, because I felt there were things I needed to learn, and I wanted to be part of the team, and sit with the team.

… Now I sit at the head of the table…  I just sort of gravitated there naturally, and that’s where I sit, because what I’ve learned is that, regardless of whatever little skill sets here and there that I might not know really well, I do know this brand better than anybody else.

On the differences between male and female leaders:

What I find interesting is that it’s not across the board, as in, men are this way and women are that way… 

What I have noticed is that men can have a real serious debate about something and sound like they’re just going at it, and you think they’re going to walk out of the room angry at each other. And they go get a sandwich, and they’re fine. They don’t take it to heart. Women don’t do that. 

And on crying at work:

One of the mistakes I’ve definitely seen women make is crying. And I’m an emotional person. I understand where the tears come from…

However, when you’re speaking to your boss or your manager about an issue, and you’re feeling overwhelmed, crying is not a good thing to do, because you don’t necessarily know how it’s being perceived by the person to whom you’re speaking. I know from personal experience that the stigma never goes away. And you are enforcing a stereotype, unfortunately, that women are weak, and they’re not as tough as men.

To read more from Price and the other women interviewed, among them Amy Schulman, the EVP and general counsel at Pfizer, and Marjorie Kaplan, the group president of the Animal Planet, Science, and Velocity Networks, click here.

 

Shop Pink! Companies Who Support Breast Cancer Awareness

October 7th, 2013 - By Tanvier Peart
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Avon Breast Cancer Banner

(photo credit: Avon Foundation)

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month which has many of us thinking pink. Whether breast cancer has affected someone you know or not, it’s a time to think about those fighting the fight as breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States. It also happens to be the second leading cause of cancer death in women.

Keeping those close to our hearts, one has to wonder what we can do to get involved. Sure there are tons of walk and run events along with the traditional donation, but what about purchasing those items that tote the pink ribbon? Unfortunately, not all products that talk about supporting breast cancer research actually put their money where their mouth is. Some are just capitalizing on the kindness of others who want to buy products with proceeds going to finding a cure.

If you have been looking for ways to support with your wallet through purchases, here are some companies who support breast cancer awareness you might want to consider.

Beauty For Body & Soul: Skincare Goodies By African-American Entrepreneurs

July 31st, 2013 - By Ann Brown
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We all like to treat our skin with care, using products that are not only good for us but also make us feel luxurious and special.

The result is a ton on money being spent on beauty products. In fact, according to a report by The Beauty Company, the total sales in the beauty and personal care industry were roughly $426 billion in 2011. And sales are going up. Total global beauty sales for January through March 2012 were up 14 percent to $2.278 billion.

And African-American women spend $7.5 billion each year on beauty products. This is 80 percent more than the general market. “The reason it’s such a dramatic difference is attributed to the fact that African-American women have to sample more products to find the right ones for their skin,” reports New York Magazine.

So here are some beauty and personal care goodies from African-American entrepreneurs that might make the search a little easier.

How The Rich Get Richer: Business Investments Of The Rich & Famous

July 26th, 2013 - By Blair Bedford
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FayesVision/WENN.com

FayesVision/WENN.com

If you think album sales, tours and promotional deals are the only ways celebrities make their millions, then you are still living in the 20th century. In today’s bustling market, there are various products, companies and start ups itching for investors. And that’s where celebrities come in, investing, in some cases, big money in order to get a big return on growing businesses they believe in.

Or you have celebs like Drew Barrymore who launch their own companies. Barrymore might not be making movies at the same pace she was before, but she’s got Flower Films (with Jimmy Fallon’s wife Nancy Juvonen) and Flower makeup brand, sold at Walmart.

Here are a few leading celebrity investors and their multi-million dollar investment deals.

‘Essence’ Editor Takes A Stand For Better Black Representation In Beauty Industry

July 22nd, 2013 - By Kimberly Gedeon
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via Beauty Biz Camp Facebook page

via Beauty Biz Camp Facebook page

Putting her foot down about the lack of representation of Black women in the beauty industry, Essence beauty editor Corynne Corbette is launching a nonprofit organization that will help companies better reflect the African-American community, reports Clutch.

The three-week program, called Beauty BizCamp, will educate young girls between the ages of 12 and 18 about how to make good decisions in beauty careers. Corbette’s goal is to encourage racial diversity in the industry.

“Instead of complaining about it, I need people to do something about it,” said Corbette. “They say we can’t find the people [to fill those jobs], so then let’s equip people to do the jobs.”

With leaders such as Lisa Price from Carol’s Daugter and Yesenia Almonte from Seventeen as teachers, Beauty BizCamp will jump start its first summer session in New York City today. The program may be pricey (it’s $1,000 to participate), but scholarships will be offered to 10 lucky young girls. And this is a program to be taken seriously, with an application process that asks for essays and a minimum 2.5 GPA.

Corbette adds that she understands that not all girls want to pursue a career in the beauty industry, but the camp will instill girls with “the whole notion of being beautiful for themselves and to understand that they have power by saying what [they think] is beautiful…”

On a more serious note, the Essence editors are also taking a stand on the George Zimmerman verdict that unleashed fury in America. Essence has launched #HeIsNotASuspect, a social media movement that is aiming to put an end to racial profiling of Black men in America.

Essence’s HeIsNotASuspect” […] is designed to challenge negative images of young African-American men,” said Vanessa Bush, Acting Managing Editor of Essence. “We also wanted to create a forum for mothers, grandmothers, aunts, and everyone else to proclaim that young African-American men are to be celebrated and not feared.

To participate in the hashtag social media campaign, supporters must upload a photo of themselves as well as a young African-American man they care about. “In a few words [explain] why he’s so much more than a stereotype,” adds Sacbee.

Don’t forget to add the hashtag #HeIsNotASuspect in your posts.

Hair Care Brands Switch Marketing Tactics To Survive Natural Hair Movement

June 18th, 2013 - By Kimberly Gedeon
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Esperanza Spalding arriving at the Grammys. Credit: Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Esperanza Spalding arriving at the Grammys. Credit: Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

“For years we’ve trusted Dark and Lovely [relaxers] to give us just the look we want,” says a soul-soaked voice in a 1992 commercial, “soft, easy-to-manage hair.”

Fast-forward to 2013 and today’s latest Dark and Lovely TV commercial encourages women to embrace their own chemically unaltered hair instead. A brown-skinned model struts around and flaunts her coily-textured hair: “Get unstoppable curls that defy shrinkage,” the ad boasts.

The drastic shift in television advertising is a reflection of current African-American ideals on hair. The Black hair industry has completely reshaped their marketing techniques amidst the natural hair craze. Between 2006 and 2011, relaxer kit sales dropped 17 percent. Afros are taking the world by storm — and it’s scaring these million-dollar hair corporations whose cash flow depend on black women slapping chemicals onto their kinks.

More women are ignoring television ads and are now engrossed in YouTube, blogs, and other social media outlets that cater to their natural hair needs. As of 2011, there were 23.9 million active African American Internet users; a substantial 76 percent visited a social networking/blog site. These online outlets provided Black women with an opportunity to create dialogue about which products are complete crap and which products are crowned as awesome. Meanwhile, hair corporations are eavesdropping on the conversation to figure out how to re-appeal to Black women.

All over the Internet, there is a slew of women online craving to know how to define their curls and reduce shrinkage. Many natural women enviously drool at YouTube hair gurus wondering why their mane doesn’t “act” the same. These are the women that hair corporations are targeting. Their insecurities make them particularly vulnerable to falling hook-line-and-sinker into overspending on hair care goodies. Phrases like “anti-shrinkage” and “curl-defining” appear on Dark and Lovely advertising, along with loose-curled models, to prey on hair-insecure natural women.

Noticing that viewers are super-curious about the products used by YouTube hair celebrities such as Jouelzy, CharyJay, and NikkiMae2003, hair brands started shipping free products to natural hair vloggers to heighten their visibility among the starry-eyed African American YouTube viewers.