All Articles Tagged "black press"

Stop The Presses? Some Say The Black Media Is Dying

April 1st, 2014 - By Ann Brown
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After the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., singer James Brown spoke on black radio stations urging people not to riot. He took to black radio because he knew the community would be tuned in.

But now, Richard Prince in his “Journal-ism” column for The Root, says the black press is dying. All the signs are there. For one, Pew Research Center totally left out the black press in its new “State of the News Media 2014” report. Even though the center says it will cover the black press in another report, the omission is ominous.

“When asked whether they have either read — or have knowledge of — a black newspaper in their home communities only about 20 percent say they have. Among those who are aware of the papers, almost none say they read them with any regularity. Let me emphasize, these are journalism students…” writes Clint C. Wilson II in “Whither the Black Press?: Glorious Past, Uncertain Future.”

Even the National Newspaper Publishers Association has complained recently that its members aren’t getting the respect they’re due.

The ad world is surely ignoring the black media. Advertisers set aside just three percent of their $2.2 billion annual budget for media targeting at black consumers, according to a new Nielsen report. This despite the fact that annual black spending is projected to rise from its current $1 trillion to $1.3 trillion by 2017.

Even President Obama has been accused of disrespecting the black press. George E. Curry, editor of the NNPA News Service, said of Obama’s slight on TVOne’s NewsOneNow With Roland Martin: “There is a disrespect for the black press that we have not seen in recent years. For example, we have requested — every year — an interview with the president. He can ignore 200 black newspapers and 19 million viewers, but he can give one to every stupid white comedian there is on TV, the black ones and the white ones, and has time for all types of buffoonery but they will not respect the black press enough to give us an interview.”

But despite the lack of ad dollars, dwindling readership, competition from blogs,  and the difficulties attracting staff, the National Newspaper Publishers Association has maintained a membership of more than 200 newspapers for nearly years.

When was the last time you read a black newspaper?

Black Journalists Trade White Newsrooms for Black

May 26th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Columbia Journalism Review) — It started as a trickle. Sylvester Monroe resigned in 2006 as Sunday national editor at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and, two months later, joined the staff of Ebonymagazine. In 2008 the renowned byline of Jack E. White, the first black columnist at Time magazine, began to regularly appear on The Root, where Lynette Clemetson, formerly ofThe New York Times and Newsweek, was managing editor. By March of this year when Constance C. R. White, once an influential New York Times fashion writer, was named editor in chief of Essence, the trickle had swelled into a river of prominent African-American journalists streaming to black-oriented media.  The names of veterans like Lynette Holloway and E. R. Shipp, formerly of The New York Times; Teresa Wiltz, Natalie Hopkinson, and Michael Cottman, all of The Washington Post; Joel Dreyfuss, formerly of Fortune and PC Magazine, and Amy DuBois Barnett ofHarper’s Bazaar and Teen People, are turning up in places like Ebony, Jet, and Essence; at BlackAmericaWeb.com, a division of Reach Media, Inc.; and at The Root, the online site spearheaded by Harvard’s Henry Louis Gates Jr. and published by The Washington Post Company.  Some of these moves were prompted by layoffs and buyouts; others by disillusionment with mainstream journalism or a desire to delve more deeply into African-American issues. Whatever the reasons, with increasing frequency, African-American journalists are reversing the once common trajectory from the black press to the mainstream. New ventures like HuffPost Global Black, a vertical for Arianna Huffington’s widely read website that will be launched in partnership with Sheila Johnson, cofounder of Black Entertainment Television, are likely to quicken the pace.

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What's Michael Steele Doing Over at the Root?

May 26th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Eurweb) — Michael Steele is now on the payroll of  MSNBC and TheRoot.  The former Republican National Committee Chairman, whose rocky two-year reign ended earlier this year, has been hired by MSNBC as a political analyst, and also TheRoot.com as a contributing editor.  The website’s executive editor Joel Dreyfuss says Steele’s addition simply reinforces its original goal — to represent “a multiplicity of black views.”

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African-American Newspaper a Family Affair

March 25th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Florida Courier) — In late 2004, the Cherry family was in a state of crisis.  Charles W. Cherry, Sr., the family patriarch, had died. Not only was he a civil rights activist, father and grandfather, he was also the key man who operated the two newspapers, the Daytona Times and the Florida Courier, that were affiliated with the family’s media company. And there was no clear plan as to how to continue the operation.  “Glenn was knee-deep in operating nine radio stations at the time,” current Florida Courier Publisher Charles W. Cherry II explained, “and I had a foot in both operations. After Daddy died, we knew that we had to keep both newspapers going.

“At the time of his death, the Daytona Times had been published for 1,369 consecutive weeks. The Florida Courier had been going for 637 consecutive weeks. To miss a weekly issue, even when the key person running the business has died, and even if you had never missed an issue before, would be the kiss of death for a Black weekly newspaper. There are no weeks off in this business.”  Cherry II recalls the family meetings that occurred after Cherry, Sr.’s death and burial. He says the same thing happens in every family-owned business after the death of a key individual.  “Everybody looks around and says, ‘What do we do now?’ There are options. You can let the business die with the person. You can operate it at a marginal level and take whatever profits you make. You can sell it. You can get a partner to run it, and hope for the best. You can walk away.

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NAACP Apologizes for Snubbing Black Press

March 15th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(TriceEdneyWire.com) –NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous admits that “a grave mistake was made” right under his nose when advertising inserts were placed only in White newspapers on the eve of the organization’s annual image awards, which aired March 4. Danny Bakewell, chairman of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA), a federation of more than 200 Black-owned newspapers, is demanding justice.

“If the NAACP desires to advertise with the white press, they need to understand and experience the repercussions of going outside of their “house” (The Black Press). The NAACP needs to know that by ignoring the Black Press they are ‘cutting off their nose to spite their face,’” Bakewell said in a March 7 letter to NNPA publishers, obtained by the Trice Edney News Wire. “We have marched side by side with them and been their voice in the African American community. It is truly disheartening to be on the battlefield with someone and not be able to share in the spoils.”

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Huffington Post to Add African-American Section

January 20th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(AP) — The Huffington Post and BET co-founder Sheila Johnson are launching a HuffPost section devoted to African-Americans.  The section, “HuffPost GlobalBlack,” is expected to debut in early March. The Huffington Post is set to make an official announcement about the new platform Thursday.  “Our goal is to cover more stories of importance to the black community,” says Arianna Huffington, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of the New York-based Huffington Post.

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Black Publisher Files Complaint Over School District’s Call for Ad Boycott

December 13th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(New American Media) — James Tucker, publisher of the African American Voice, the city’s only Black newspaper, has asked the federal government to stop a local school district from advocating an advertising boycott of his publication.  Tucker recently filed a racial discrimination complaint with the U.S. Justice Department against Harrison School District 2 alleging that Superintendent Mike Miles wrote a letter asking businesses not to advertise in the African American Voice.  “If your organization advertises in his paper, you are either wittingly or inadvertently sending a message of support for the paper’s extreme views and incivility,” Miles wrote in a letter on Harrison School District stationary dated Nov. 2. The letter appeared on the publicly-financed school district website.

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