All Articles Tagged "african american unemployment"

Fact Sheet: What the Jobs Bill Does for Blacks

September 9th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(White House) — The American Jobs Act reflects a commitment to strengthen the recovery and help increase access to jobs for all Americans. With unemployment among African-Americans at an unacceptably high rate of 16.7 percent – and 1.4 million African-Americans out of work for more than six months – the President believes that inaction is not an option. That’s why the President is putting out a plan to increase the pace of job creation, and why he is committed to fighting for Congress to act on this plan. These measures – which will expand opportunities for the long-term unemployed to reenter the workforce, provide incentives for businesses to hire, and make investments in revitalizing schools, infrastructure and neighborhoods – will help create new job opportunities in African-American communities and across the country. For example:

—The extension of unemployment insurance will benefit 1.4 million African-Americans and their families. At the same time, the President is proposing bipartisan reforms that will enable that – as these families continue to receive UI benefits – the program is better tailored to support reemployment for the long-term unemployed.

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A Harlem Church Gives Care To The Unemployed

September 5th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Huffington Post) — Outside the First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem, a line starts forming at about 9 o’clock every Friday morning. Unattended shopping carts stretching 50 feet down the sidewalk stand as placeholders, cordoned off by dirty yellow twine held up between two stanchions.  Across from the carts in the shade of the church’s eave, senior citizens occupy fold-up chairs they have brought with them for the wait. Some read. One person plays a scratch card, while another woman in a purple sweatshirt and wool hat sits and sings hymns from the bible.  They are waiting for donated food, and there now are more people lining up than anyone can recall — a sure sign of troubled times.  The weekly food pantry at First Corinthian Baptist has been part of the church’s community service programs for well over a decade, but over the last two years, the lines have gotten longer, and the people coming for help have gotten younger, staff members say, due to the unemployment crisis.

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Black Unemployment Reaches New Height

September 3rd, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(BET) — The Labor Department has released the August jobs report and the unemployment figured was unchanged from July’s  9.1 percent. In addition, the economy added only 17,000 new jobs. The African-American jobless rate climbed from 15.9 to 16.7, which only strengthens the argument of Black lawmakers that there is a critical need to specifically address this problem.  The unemployment rate for Black males rose a whole percentage point to 18.0 percent and the rate for Black youths aged 16–19 jumped from 39.2 to 46.5 percent.  According to William Darity, an economist at Duke University, the Black unemployment rate may be in part attributed to more people feeling less discouraged about finding employment and reentering the workforce to jumpstart their job searches, Still, he says, it is also a sign of the discrimination that continues to exist in the labor market.

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Lawmakers Trade the Town Hall for Job Fairs

August 24th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Christian Science Monitor) — With unemployment locked in double digits in many congressional districts, the defining political event of the summer for many members of Congress is becoming the jobs fair, sponsored by lawmakers to connect constituents with actual hiring prospects.  The concept has taken off with conservative Republicans as well as liberal Democrats serving some of the poorest communities in America.  The political advantages are two-fold: The events cast members as doing something about the nation’s jobs crisis while at the same time shielding them from public confrontations with angry voters. It means town-hall meetings – once a staple of the congressional summer season – are now in decline thanks to the testy summer of 2009, when health-care protests helped launch the tea party movement and provided endless grist for opposition campaign ads.

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Black Banks Struggle in Bleak Economy

August 23rd, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Huffington Post) — After more than a century of delivering financial resources to underserved communities, black-owned banks are struggling to remain relevant — and solvent — in an economic environment full of pitfalls.  Their traditional customer base — lower and middle class blacks, small business owners and churches — has been disproportionately affected by high unemployment, leaving customers with less money to deposit and, in turn, leaving many of these smaller financial institutions with less capital to reinvest in their communities. As customers have fallen on hard times or fallen behind in their loan repayments or mortgages, home foreclosures have become a nagging issue, hamstringing banks’ portfolios with toxic loans. Meanwhile, many customers with big savings and healthy checking accounts opt for the flexibility of larger banks, which offer more branches and a wider variety of services.  “This minority bank community is really catching hell,” said Michael Grant, the president of theNational Banker’s Association, an 84-year-old trade group that represents minority-owned banks. “They have survived everything, including world wars and Jim Crow, but this has been one of the most difficult periods of all.”

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Report: Black Women Lead Job Losses

August 17th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Crain’s) — While the recession hit black men harder than any other group, the economic recovery has shifted that impact to their female counterparts, according to a recent report by the National Women’s Law Center, which shows that black women have lately seen their unemployment rate rise even as other populations—including black men—have finally begun to regain jobs.  Between June 2009 and June 2011, black men gained 127,000 jobs while black women lost more than twice that number, 258,000, the report says. That means that black women have now lost more total jobs than have black men since the recession began in December 2007.

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Black Joblessness Puts Obama and CBC at Odds

August 8th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Washington Post) — Black lawmakers are embarking on a monthlong campaign Monday to address the staggering unemployment rate among African Americans, an issue that has become a growing source of tension between members of the Congressional Black Caucus and the Obama administration.  Lawmakers have met with the administration three times this year seeking support for programs that specifically address the black community, but President Obama has not backed their proposals. The caucus chairman last week slammed the deal negotiated by the administration to raise the national debt ceiling and cut government spending as a “Satan sandwich” that unfairly harms African Americans.  Now, as the CBC launches its most public and coordinated jobs campaign so far, the president is notably absent from the lineup. Instead, the White House has dispatched Housing Secretary Shaun Donovan, who is white, to the event and announced that Obama will embark on his own jobs tour that will take place in the middle of the CBC’s campaign.

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Black Caucus Launches Job Fairs Around the Country

August 3rd, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(News One) — With Black unemployment at 16.2 percent and no solution on the horizon, the Congressional Black Caucus, who have been vocal about the lack of unemployment programs aimed at African Americans, are launching their own cross-country job fair beginning this week.

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Jobs Picture Ever Bleaker for Black Men

July 27th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Christian Science Monitor) — The jobs landscape is bleak for any unemployed American, but for black men it’s virtually a desert.  For them, the Great Recession not only led to the largest increase in unemployment for any category of American worker, but it also is pinching a lot longer. About 1 in 6 black men over age 20 in the labor force is jobless – and that number has barely improved since the economic recovery officially began two years ago.  In Detroit, Las Vegas, Milwaukee, Min neap olis-St. Paul, and several other US cities, Depression-era unemployment rates above 20 percent beset the black community, estimates one economic policy group, citing government data. Moreover, the problem may get worse because city governments, which traditionally employ many African-American men, are laying off workers to cope with budget shortfalls, say experts on black employment.  The change has been dramatic. The jobless rate, 7.5 percent in prerecession days, is now 17 percent – more than double the rate for white men. The ramifications are dramatic: a slide out of the middle class; greater dependence on public assistance; new strain on families, including the challenge of meeting mortgage or child-support payments; and more homelessness.

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Could Black Unemployment Block Obama’s Reelection?

July 19th, 2011 - By TheEditor
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(Politic365) — Last week the Department of Labor confirmed that the African American community continues to be among the hardest hit by the economic recessions, with an estimated 16.2 percent of blacks unemployed in June, compared to 8 percent of whites, and 9.2 percent for the overall population. The figures sparked outrage from many in the black community, who demanded that this president do more.  “Can you imagine a situation with any other group of workers… if 34 percent of white women were out there looking for work and couldn’t find it?” said Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus. “You would see congressional hearings and community gatherings. There would be rallies and protest marches. There is no way that this would be allowed to stand.”

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