All Articles Tagged "african american unemployment rate"

You’re Still The Man, Baby: Supporting Your Husband After A Layoff

August 24th, 2012 - By Jazmine Denise Rogers
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thyblackman.com

Job loss is a pretty common occurrence these days, considering the economically strained times in which we currently live. The statistics for unemployment rates are constantly plastered across newspaper headlines and blasted through radio airways; however, it doesn’t become real until it happens to you or someone you love. Losing a job can be a very traumatic and emotional experience for anyone, but it can be especially damaging for a man who is by nature the breadwinner of his family. Unemployment can breed feelings of inadequacy, resentment, unworthiness, and a host of other undesirable feelings that are not conducive to a person’s self-esteem, emotional health, or the prosperity of their marriage. Coping with your husband losing his job can be very challenging. It is often a very fragile period when the roles become reversed and a wife takes on the role as the primary financial supporter and should be approached with care.

As a wife you are your husband’s life partner and by default his primary support system. And, it is during this time that your support is absolutely necessary. While you may not be able to get him a new job, you can certainly make the process easier by providing your husband with the mental and emotional nurturing that he needs to make it through this rough time. Here are some tips on how to not only to support your spouse during his time of unemployment, but to also take advantage of this time to strengthen the bond that you already share.

 1. Be expressive of your gratitude: He may already be feeling down on himself because he is currently unable to provide for you financially, so be sure to encourage him by letting him know just how much you appreciate all that he does provide. Let him know that he is more than just the family’s breadwinner, but he is also the protector, the guide, the leader, the example.

2. Be reassuring: Let him know that you recognize that his current lack of employment is not a result of laziness or lack of ambition, but merely a rough patch that the two of you will work through as a team.

3. Be attentive: He will eventually want to express his feelings, worries, and concerns, even if he doesn’t want to initially. When he is ready to talk about it don’t be too busy to listen. Allow him ample time to express how he feels. Don’t dominate the entire conversation, allow him to get it all out. It is also a good idea to wait until he is ready to talk. Don’t nag and probe, this can sometimes make a bad situation worse.

4. Be suggestive: Offer ways to possibly cut down on expenses or generate more income until he is back on his feet. Maybe you can cut back on your shopping, put forth more of an effort to hunt for bargains, or pick up a few extra hours at work.

5. Be affectionate: Now more than ever he could probably use a little extra TLC. Make him feel wanted, do little things to show how much you care.

6. Be understanding: It can be really tough landing a new gig in this economy, so try to understand that getting a new job can take time. Trust that he is actively looking for work and try to be patient.

7. Pray together: Uniting spiritually not only strengthens bonds, but it also makes burdens easier to bear. In 2010 the Huffington Post reported “researchers found that people in same-faith relationships and partners who attended services regularly were more satisfied with their relationship.”

Jazmine Denise is a freelance writer living in New York. Follow her on Twitter @jazminedenise

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Despite Unemployment Drop, Black Women Unemployment Rises

January 12th, 2012 - By Charlotte Young
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by Charlotte Young

Around the country the job search is finally yielding results for many of exhausted job searchers. The unemployment rate is falling for the third consecutive month and in December 200,000 jobs in the private sector were created. Unfortunately, as The Seattle Medium points out, African Americans aren’t exactly benefiting from the job increase. In fact, the African American unemployment rate has increased from 15.5 to 15.8 percent, with black women experiencing the biggest loss.

Although the unemployment rate for African American women is 13.9 percent, lower than the male rate of 15.7 percent, this year African American men have actually gained jobs while African American women have lost them. This is partially due to what jobs are being created in the economy. Many companies are creating positions for construction and redevelopment jobs, roles predominately filled by men. Jobs that women tend to take such as teachers, social workers and nurses, are still being cut. In addition, about 23 percent of African Americans work at some level of the government. And at the federal, state and local level, government workers are being let go, not hired.

As so many are trying to get back on their feet, the gap in employment has also created a growing wealth gap. The Seattle Medium reports that the median wealth of American families has dropped to $20,500—compared to the Congressional gain of $725,000.

While the unemployment rate may continue to drop, it still encompasses about 13.1 million people still looking for work. In the competitive pool so large odds are tough for African American women.

88% of Blacks Feel They’ve Been Victims of Racial Discrimination at Work

March 19th, 2011 - By Veronica Wells
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A YourBlackWorld found that 88 percent of its audience felt they’ve been racially discriminated against in the workplace, at some point in their careers.

5 percent said they had not been and 6 percent said they weren’t sure whether it was discrimination or not.

The results were pretty consistent between men and women.

This is certainly a story we’ve heard before; but, these numbers are particularly troubling when the unemployment rate among African Americans is 15.3 percent compared to 8 percent for whites.

Check out Dr. Boyce Watkins’ analysis of the results over at Black Voices.

Have you ever felt you were the victim of racial discrimination at work? How did you know it was racial?

Why is African-American Unemployment Increasing?

September 8th, 2010 - By TheEditor
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(Politics 365) — The U.S. Labor Department reported on Friday that unemployment for African Americans increased to 16.3% in August 2010 from 15.6% in July 2010.  The percentage point increase was greater than it was for Whites and Hispanics.  Overall unemployment climbed to 9.6% for the month of August from the July unemployment rate of 9.5%. The unemployment rate is defined as that portion of the labor force that is unemployed and actively seeking work.  The labor force is comprised of all people over the age of 16 that are either working for pay or actively seeking work for pay.

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