What Happens When You Go Partially Vegetarian

July 7, 2017  |  
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If you can’t get on board with the idea of becoming a full vegetarian, then that’s okay. You can actually reap many of the benefits of a vegetarian diet by simply going part vegetarian. If you typically eat meat at every meal (bacon at breakfast, chicken salad at lunch and lamb at dinner) consider reducing that to once a day. If you usually eat meat five times a week, try reducing that to three times a week. For those who don’t know, you can still get plenty of protein from foods like tempeh, beans, quinoa, seitan and buckwheat. And you actually only need to consume meat a few times a week to get more than enough of the nutrients it provides like iron and B12. Transitioning to a mostly vegetarian diet could alleviate some conditions that you’ve otherwise been treating with medication. Here is what happens when you start eating a mostly vegetarian diet.

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You could feel happier

Animal products contain Arachidonic acid, which can create mood swings. In fact, the medication used to treat bipolar disorder typically works to reduce the turnover of Arachidonic acid in the brain.

 

 

 

 

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You’ll have more energy

Just how effective is vegetarianism at improving energy? Just consider that NFL players are turning to it. Your body more readily turns plants into energy than meat, which is why David Carter stopped hitting the steakhouse with his teammates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You could smell better

One study took a look at two groups of individuals—one removing meat from the diet for several weeks and one continuing to eat it—and found that the vegetarian group was perceived as smelling better. Maybe rather than purchasing powerful deodorant you could swap out some steak for some soy protein.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You’ll be more regular

If you suffer from irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, digestive discomfort, bloating or any sort of irregularity, cutting back on meat and boosting your vegetable and complex carb intake can help substantially. Your body has to work harder to break down animal products and, as such, those foods stay in your intestine longer and take longer to work their way through your system, causing issues like bloating and constipation.

 

 

 

 

 

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You’ll save money

Beans, tofu, tempeh and other vegetarian sources of protein are far less expensive than meat. One can of beans, which will typically contain more than enough protein for two meals, can cost as little as $1. Meanwhile, a chicken breast (as you know if you visit the butcher regularly) can cost anywhere from $3 to $6, depending on if you go free-range, organic etc. And chicken is one of the cheaper types of meat! If you move into red meat or fish, you’re facing higher prices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your skin may improve

Eating a mostly vegetarian diet typically increases zinc levels in people. Zinc helps with detoxification, and that naturally creates a gorgeous “glow” in your skin. You may also notice that glow in your hair and nails.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You can eat larger quantities

When it comes to calorie count, it’s nearly impossible to overeat vegetables. A whole head of greens—from romaine to kale—typically only has about 30 calories. Tofu and beans are also very low in calories. But when you’re eating meat, your calorie count can go up quickly. So you can choose between an enormous tofu and spinach scramble or a burger the size of your palm. If you like large quantities of food, you may enjoy this perk of the vegetarian diet.

 

 

 

 

 

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It can help with diabetes management

Eating a mostly vegetarian diet could promote a healthy weight, which in turn promotes healthier blood sugar levels and can aid in the management of diabetes. Vegetarianism can also boost your body’s insulin response, slightly reducing the need for diabetes medication.

 

 

 

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You’ll explore more restaurants

Switching to a mostly vegetarian diet will force you to explore your city more than you ever have before. Your regular restaurants may not offer much by way of vegetarian meals. They could have a couple of salads or some tofu dish, but you’ll want to find places with extensive and inspired vegetarian menus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your cholesterol will drop

High cholesterol is typically the result of a diet high in saturated fat, which is found in most animal products. Some people see a significant improvement in their cholesterol levels within just a few months of going mostly vegetarian.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your muscle pain could subside

The healthy carbohydrates found in a vegetarian diet—things like quinoa and sourdough bread—are good for your muscles. Muscle pain can also be a result of a nutrient deficiency, specifically vitamin A, vitamin C, healthy fats and chlorophyll (which reduces inflammation). If you adjust your plate so it’s made up mostly of vegetables, you’ll receive more of these nutrients.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PMS symptoms could improve

When you eat a diet high in meat, you naturally receive extra hormones from those animals. That excess of hormones can throw off your own hormonal balance, and make PMS symptoms worse. Furthermore, plant chlorophyll removes suprlus oestrogens from the liver, so eating more vegetables can improve your hormonal balance.

 

 

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Your sex drive could increase

The hormonal imbalance that comes with a high-meat diet strikes again. If you’ve been suffering from a low libido but know it has nothing to do with your attraction to your partner, see if eating a mostly vegetarian diet can help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your heart disease risk can drop

If you are at risk of heart disease, your doctor will be proud of you for cutting back on your meat consumption. Extensive research has found that a vegetarian diet can greatly reduce blood lipids and total cholesterol.

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