No One Misses the Missing Black Girls

23 comments
October 18, 2011 ‐ By

I remember the headline on MSNBC’s homepage when I opened my web browser yesterday morning: “Baby Lisa’s mom: I was drunk when she vanished.” The article told the story of Lisa Irwin, the white Kansas City mother of a 10-month-old baby who went missing on Oct. 4.

Then today, as I casually searched for news on black women, I just happened to come across a couple of articles about two black girls who are missing. The pieces were small, ran on local news sites, black websites, or blogs. There has been no national attention, nothing that would make you stop and pay attention to these stories, or more importantly to one of these girls if you happened to come across them, because in all likelihood you probably wouldn’t even know they are missing.

Jhessye Shockley is a 5-year-old girl from Glendale, Arizona, has been missing for nearly a week. An Amber Alert for the girl was issued last Wednesday morning and canceled Friday, in accordance with standard Amber Alert procedures.  So far the biggest break in the case seems to be a tip that came into police of a black female between 25 and 30 years old, about 120 pounds, with black hair in a bun and brown eyes, putting a child that matched Jhessye’s description in a vehicle. The woman was wearing a white tank top and blue jeans rolled up to mid-calf. The vehicle was a black 1998 to 2000 4-door Chevy Malibu.

And then there is 15-year-old Pittsburgh teen Michiko Hamilton who hasn’t been seen since visiting a friend Friday. Police say she was last contacted near the intersection of Frankstown Avenue and Overbrook Road in Penn Hills — no one has heard from her since.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/poetryemotionbyjay Jay Arrington

    “On Page Twelve”

    (For the missing Black girls)

    I’m not a front-page story

    Not a story for the mainstream

    Just my family knew my glory

    Just my family knew my dream

    I’m not the lead off story

    On the primetime evening news

    You may see a bulletin for me

    Once the movies are reviewed

    I’m not the first rate story

    That reporter’s look
    to find

    Unless I’ve done something gory

    To someone unlike my kind

    I’m not searched for in massive hunts

    Not the topic of debates

    I’m only missed on my home front

    At the table where I ate

    I’m not the tragic story

    For a movement or a cause

    To punish the predatory

    By naming after me new laws

    I don’t rate charity balls

    For me candle light vigils aren’t held

    You can read I even lived at all

    At the bottom of page twelve

    Poetry Emotion By Jay

    ©

    2002

  • http://www.twitter.com/MOTRenaissance theoneash20

    This is what BW should be focused on… And thank you for leaving BM out of this..

  • Amethyst

    Its always been that way. I live in NE Ohio and on the news a day or two ago they reported on a black girl from Cleveland that has been missing for 3 weeks. They are just now reporting on her and the only reason they are, is because her mother was almost a victim of that serial killer Anthony Sowell and she testified at his trial. I guarantee they will not say anything else about this girl unless she comes up dead. I don’t understand why is it that white girl comes up missing, the whole world is supposed to stop and look for her, but when a black girl or a boy (of any race) disappears, we never hear about it. Every missing person deserves the same amount of coverage no matter their gender, sex, age, race or how wayward they may be.

  • peace

    no one misses the missing black boys.
    not even the black community.

  • Anubis

    No one cares fo the missing black girls….JUST LIKE KNOW ONE CARES ABOUT THE MISSING BLACK BOYS.
    guess we even.
    The hate you gives little infants f.u.c.k.s everbody. So f.u.c.k you

  • Jazz

    This is sad, this summer in my hometown of Jacksonville, Florida the sheriff's office ignored frantic 911 calls from a man witnessing a young black girl getting abducted by a group of men. The 911 operator even told him to go home! A week later they found her mutilated body in the woods smdh. I see this story about this white baby every morning on the news since it happened and I've heard nothing about those two little black girls. Breaks my heart that our kids dont receive the justice they deserve.

    • Paradise

      I remember this case as I am a J-ville resident also. R.I.P. Michelle McCoy.

  • mommyof3

    I post and repost on FB nobody comments, but if I was posting DRAMA i would have 50 comments

  • mommyof3

    I live in Pittsburgh also, the post gazette was the only media outlet who reported this. I posted on "today show" wall asking why is it that baby Lisa all over their FB page and their web site, what about William McQuain or Jahessye Shockley? smdh!!!!! Jahessye the police waited 12 hours 12 hours????!!!!!!! to issue an Amber Alert.

  • http://livingoutsidethestacks.com DaenelT

    I discussed this on my Facebook page about a week ago. And I've since contacted the big news media outlets to find out why no one is covering these cases and not one has bothered to reply. Everyone should be outraged…

  • Pittsburgh

    I live in Pittsburgh, and I have heard nothing about this young lady missing. Even our local news hasn't reported it. That's Pittsburgh for you. If the Mayor of Pgh. can walk past you without giving you eye contact, I guess the local media can to.

  • Judith

    The only AA girl I can remember that was on the local news was Rilyah Wilson,and that was only because the state was negligent and lost her. This was about 10 years ago.

  • soul

    But white men love black women, right? Don't you just laugh at the black women defend white men, yet they do not care about when black WOMEN are missing and killed. HA HA HA

    • flo

      Get a life.

    • http://www.twitter.com/MOTRenaissance theoneash20

      Thank You

  • http://www.facebook.com/deangala.miller DeAnga'la Sugafreesprite Miller

    They did the same thing to my cousin when we found out she was missing in 2004 and we later found out in 2005 that she was murder. A black reported actually told my family that African American missing people aren't considered news worthy stories. Because Americans can't relate to them. Its called missing white girl syndrome Google it!

  • IllyPhilly

    The little girl was posted by my co-worker on FB since it was a family member of hers about a week or 2 ago and this is the first time I've seen this ANY where. As soon as a kids goes missing all these Bossip, Madame Noire type sites should have an immediate blog post instead of close ups on Rihanna's cellulite.

  • R&R

    Often times those families contact the media–it's up to the families of these girls to call the national media and make them cover the story!

  • Pingback: Reblog: No One Misses the Missing Black Girls (Madame Noire) « Black and Missing but Not Forgotten

  • blackandmissing

    We have to be our own media. Until they see the picture, outlets like ours (www.blackandmissing.com) will have to do until the media understand that there need to be more equality in the reporting of missing persons. Thanks for writing this article, I will share it on my blog!

  • Shannon

    I can't even explain how much this saddens me. This needs to change. We need to be up at those newstations and television networks, rallying with these stories in hand. There is no excuse that these girls' (and countless others) are not broadcasted and given national coverage. This really makes me sad to live in America.

  • Korey

    Where is Nancy Grace?

    Seriously.. the only time you hear about a kid of color is when they are abused… Other than that… :P

    • Jen

      she was too busy "dancing with the stars". I think she stopped her other shows (temporarily) just to be on this one.