Eating Disorders Nobody Talks About

December 1, 2016  |  
1 of 15

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Anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating are some of the most commonly known eating disorders. Since they receive the most attention, many people who suffer from disordered eating may think that they don’t, simply because their symptoms don’t match those of these better-known conditions. But disordered eating manifests itself in several ways.

If you have habits pertaining to your eating and exercise that you hide from others for fear they’ll worry about you, if your eating and exercise habits dominate other areas of your life, or if you feel that your thoughts are consumed by concerns about eating and exercise, there is a possibility you suffer from one of the lesser-known eating conditions. Disclaimer: these are not official medical conditions, but common clusters of symptoms that can constitute their own eating disorder. Here are eating disorders many people aren’t talking about.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

Pregorexia

Pregnant women are expected to gain between 25 and 30 pounds before giving birth. But some women dread this weight gain and keep an incredibly strict diet and workout regiment to try to avoid that weight gain.

 

 

 

 

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Shutterstock

The risks

Weight gain is an important part of a healthy pregnancy. A restrictive diet can lead to health complications for yourself and your baby, and rigorous exercise is generally not recommended for pregnant women.

 

 

 

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

Only pure foods

There is certainly plenty of evidence that our processed and manufactured foods are not good for us. Even foods that claim to be natural may have gone through some processing. Some people, however, obsess over having totally pure foods. In other words, they only need totally organic, and often only raw vegetables, gluten-free grains and possibly organic, free-range meat.

 

 

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

The risks

Any diet that causes a mental obsession can turn into an eating disorder. While a “pure” diet may, in fact, be good for your body, it is very hard in today’s society to get enough calories following this diet. And following such a diet can force you to make all of your meals at home, from scratch, limiting your social interaction.

 

 

 

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Image Source: Shutterstock

Worshipping the scale

Studies have shown that people who keep a healthy weight weigh themselves more than those who do not. However, you do not need to weigh yourself daily—or several times a day—to do so. Some people, however, schedule their day around what the scale says. They will cancel social plans to work out because they gained one pound; they will leave themselves hungry after a meal because they gained two pounds.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

The risks

It’s perfectly normal for one’s weight to fluctuate a few pounds every week. If you plan your day based on the number on that scale, then that is interfering with your ability to lead a normal life and constitutes disordered eating.

 

 

 

 

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Image Source: Shutterstock

Calorie counting

Calorie counting can be a helpful tool if you truly need to lose weight. But some people are obsessed with eating a precise number of calories every single day and will stop when they’ve hit that number, even if they are still hungry. They cannot eat at restaurants that don’t offer calorie counts for their foods and can’t eat dinner at a friend’s home because that friend doesn’t offer calorie information about her food.

Hungry woman overeating

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The risks

If you depend too much on what the calorie calculator says, you can fall out of communication with your own body. How you feel is more important than what the calorie counter says. You should know if you are hungry or full without seeing that number.

 

 

 

 

 

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Shutterstock

Exercise over everything

Incorporating exercise into your daily routine is a healthy habit. But missing out on anything and everything else if necessary, is not. If you need to wake up at 5 am for a flight one day, so you wake up at 3 am to exercise, that is rather obsessive. If you skip out on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity while traveling so you can hit the gym; that is rather obsessive.

 

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Shutterstock

The risks

Well, the risk is missing out on life! If you cannot skip a workout to see Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel, then exercise dominates your life, and that is a form of disordered eating/exercise.

 

 

 

 

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Shutterstock

False sensitivities

Not to say that people “fake” having food sensitivities, but many people have clung onto the concept that “most people” are mildly allergic to certain foods, like gluten and dairy, and have eliminated these foods from their diets entirely, even though they display no sensitivity symptoms.

 

 

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Shutterstock

The risks

If you cut out food for years to which you actually have no allergies, you can become sensitive to these foods. Plus, any time you are making drastic changes that unnecessarily inconvenience –not just challenge — you, just to lose weight, you can qualify that as disordered eating.

 

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

Drunkorexia

Drunkorexia is defined by the pattern of starving oneself, exercising to the point of exhaustion or vomiting up food in preparation for consuming tons of calories from alcohol.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Shutterstock

The risks

It is always dangerous to starve oneself, exercise to the point of exhaustion or throw up. But it’s especially dangerous when you’ll be filling your body with toxins from alcohol. It will be less equipped than ever to handle those toxins if you have an empty stomach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Drunk binging

You’re likely aware that many people use alcohol as an excuse to do things they know they shouldn’t. Some people drink so as not to feel guilty about binge eating. They don’t feel guilty while drunk and eating, but they do the next day, which is when starvation, over exercising and vomiting can occur.

 

 

 

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

The risks

If your relationship with food has become so strained that you need to drink alcohol to avoid your thoughts about it, you likely have some disordered eating patterns and need to seek professional help.

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