Things To Consider When You Want To Quit Condoms

October 17, 2016  |  
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If you’ve been with your partner for several years—perhaps you’re married—you know you’re both clean, and you plan on spending your lives together, you might feel that you’re ready to kick the condoms. You feel as emotionally intimate as can be, so you’d like to be as physically intimate as can be. Plus you know sex without condoms just feels better for your partner and you think he deserves to experience that. It doesn’t hurt that you can save hundreds of dollars a year if you stop buying condoms (not to mention avoid those embarrassing moments when your dog tries to eat the condom out of the trashcan, or your mother comes to visit, and there’s a wrapper on the floor). At the end of the day, there are a lot of reasons couples want to stop using condoms, but there are some things to consider before doing so.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

You can give your partner HPV

If you have human papilloma virus (which 79 million Americans do, by the way) and stop using condoms, you will almost certainly give it to your partner. That is if you haven’t already—HPV can spread through skin-on-skin contact in the areas surrounding the genitals.

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

What to consider

You’re not putting your partner’s health at risk—men are just carriers—but you could be putting his future partners’ health at risk. Be absolutely positive this guy is the one, or else you may put his future partners at risk of cervical cancer or warts.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

If he has genital herpes, part I

If your partner has genital herpes, there are plenty of ways to (almost) eliminate your chances of contracting it. Your partner can take medication, and just make sure he pays attention to the situation downstairs.

Source: Shutterstock

Source: Shutterstock

What to consider

If your partner does pass genital herpes onto you, it’s not the end of the world if you stay together. He certainly can’t judge you for having it, since he gave it to you! But if you ever break up, you will have to explain your situation to every new partner.

Corbis Images

Corbis Images

If he has genital herpes, part II

Okay so, your partner has genital herpes. You’ve decided to stop using condoms and you know you will spend forever together.

 

 

 

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Image Source: Shutterstock

What to consider

If your partner passes herpes onto you, and you want to have children, you will probably need to have a cesarean section. Vaginal birth can pass herpes onto your child.

 

 

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Shutterstock

You might be allergic to his sperm

There are a lot of sensitivities you open yourself up to when you stop using condoms. Some women are allergic to semen. An allergic reaction of this kind can be very painful, and come with swelling, pain, itchiness and redness around and in the vagina.

 

 

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

What to consider

Well, if you are allergic to your partner’s sperm, it’s better to find out sooner than later. If this turns out to be the case, then you’ll need to go back to condoms to have sex. Be prepared for that letdown. It also means that, if you want to have children, you’ll have to do that through in vitro fertilization.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

You might be allergic to his soap

Most women know not to put soap on their vaginas because it can mess with their pH levels, and cause urinary tract and bladder infections. Men, however, aren’t as sensitive to these products, and most men put soap on their penis. When you used condoms, your vagina wasn’t really exposed to that soap residue.

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Image Source: Shutterstock

What to consider

Make sure your partner uses completely organic, unscented soap on his nether regions and tell him to rinse thoroughly.

 

Corbis

Corbis

You may not get as wet

Most condoms are lubricated! In fact, they provide more lubrication than your vagina can by itself. You may not have realized that until things are uncomfortably dry down there when you remove said condoms.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

What to consider

You may be saving money on condoms, but you’ll have to spend money on lubricant. It’s not a huge deal, but it’s time to start looking into what sort of lubricant you want, and what sensitivities you have to common ingredients in lube.

 

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Shutterstock

You’ll have to do more laundry

I’ll try not to be indelicate about the matter but, um, semen will no longer be conveniently trapped in a condom anymore. It will go up into your vagina. And then, it will go back down. Like, when you sit up on the sheets.

 

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Shutterstock

What to consider

You may just have to learn how to shimmy off the bed a– up, so you don’t spill the, er, specimen. Or be ready to do a lot more laundry.

 

 

 

 

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

You need to be on it with your pill

Admit it; you were a little lax on taking your pill when you knew you were just going to use condoms. You can’t do that anymore.

 

 

 

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Shutterstock

What to consider

If you’re switching to the pill or another form of birth control, do your research to find the one that is best-suited to your lifestyle. If, for example, you have a hectic schedule, the pill that must be taken at the same time each day probably isn’t best for you.

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Your guy will finish faster

Hey, it’s one of the reasons you want to quit condoms; sex feels better without them! That’s especially true for your partner. He may know how to last long with a rubber on, but that could change once the condom goes.

Corbis

Corbis

What to consider

At least while your partner gets used to all of these new sensations, make sure he gives you plenty of foreplay. That way, you’ll be ready for your big O once intercourse starts. Because believe me, he will be ready.

 

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Image Source: Shutterstock.com

Infidelity can destroy you

Infidelity is awful for obvious reasons, but one of the not-often-discussed ones is a matter of health. If your partner cheats on you, and you don’t use condoms, he could give you an STD.

 

 

Image Source: Shutterstock

Image Source: Shutterstock

What to consider

Don’t stop using condoms unless you absolutely trust your partner. So, if quitting condoms is some attempt to improve your sex life to save a failing relationship, don’t do it.

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