Airline Launches Child-Free Zones On Airplanes And Parents Are Not Happy

October 12, 2016  |  

via GIPHY

If I’m being honest, I usually panic when I see too many children waiting to board flights with their parents. At times they can be quite obnoxious and lack serious boundaries. However, I never thought airlines would have child-free zones on their air crafts to appeal to travelers who are childless.

Mirror UK reports IndiGo Airlines is banning children under the age of 12 from eight rows of seating and parents are fearful that other airlines will follow suit. In a statement about their latest policy, IndiGo noted that traveling parents should keep in mind “the comfort and convenience of all passengers, rows one to four and 11 to 14 are to be kept as a quiet zone.” Mirror states children will also be banned from sitting in emergency seating on IndiGo, as well.

Mother Laura Brook told Mirror UK that the ban is ridiculous and she shouldn’t have to explain to other passengers why her one-year-old son is crying. “I’m not going to explain myself to an adult who should understand that babies do cry,” she said.

Brook continued to point out that children are sometimes better behaved than adults. “What about the people making noise after having too much to drink? It was a new experience for all of us as we’d never flown as a family before. With all their worries, parents don’t need all this added stress,” she claimed.

Airlines like Virgin and BA have assured traveling families that they will not ban children from certain areas of the plane and will continue to be “family friendly.”

IndiGo revealed they decided to have child-free zones after other Asian airlines had similar changes.

Should all airlines adopt IndiGo’s new policy or allow children to sit anywhere on their planes?

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