Bet You Didn’t Know: The Most Toxic Products At The Dollar Store

January 15, 2016  |  
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Every bargain lover knows that getting good finds at the dollar store can be a big hit or a major miss. But a new report on dollar store products found that there are some products you should always skip — because they’re toxic.

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Image Source: Shutterstock

Cords And Cables

Extension cords, USB chargers, and other cables at the dollar store are often cheap because they’re made with low-quality materials. Some of these materials tested high in PVC, a toxic chemical that has been known to cause cancer.

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Kitchen Utensils

The plastic ones are made with the flame retardent bromine that’s known to cause cancer and birth defects if it winds up in your food. Buy metal ones instead.

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Plastic Shower Curtains

That strong chemical smell you get when you open them could be a sign that there are strong — and possibly toxic — chemicals inside like PVC. Some dollar store brands leak this chemical for up to 30 days after they’re unwrapped.

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Image Source: Shutterstock

Silly Straws

Bendy straws at the dollar store may contain phthalates that can trigger asthma and allergies in children.

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Pencil Pouches

We all had these as a kid. But some dollar store brands were listed as highly toxic — especially for little hands.

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Removable Stickers

These decorations are so high in PVC, the American Public Health Association has called them “among the most hazardous of plastic materials.” Many stores have removed these from their shelves, but some dollar stores still keep them around.

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Disposable Table Covers

Those plastic disposable table covers are perfect for parties. But some brands found at the dollar store contain lead. This neurotoxin is especially harmful to children and can cause lower IQs and behavioral problems. You’re better off buying the cloth ones instead.

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Metallic Christmas Garlands

These were found to be so high in bromine that they can spread it into household dust where it can hang around long after Christmas is over.

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Christmas Lights

Some dollar store versions contain chlorine, bromine, and other toxic chemicals that can spread to your hands and make their way into your mouth. You’re better off buying these at a big box store when they go on sale after the holidays.

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Metal Kids’ Jewelry

Most of these aren’t screened for toxins, and several brands have been found to be high in lead. Even a small amount can impair a child’s brain development.

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Beads

More flame retardants and lead here — some of the highest concentrations in all of the products tested.

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Bath Mats

Those extra cheap mats and stickers have high amounts of PVC, phthalates and other chemicals that are easily absorbed through your feet.

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Plastic Headbands

Not only are these toxic, but they’re also dangerous for small kids who put them on their heads and into their mouths.

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Image Source: Shutterstock

Flip Flops And Jellies

This footwear feels like a great dollar store find, but some brands have harmful chemicals that are easily absorbed through your feet on hot summer days.

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