9 Strange Things You Never Knew About Breastfeeding

June 25, 2014  |  

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From YourTango

By Nicole Weaver and Michelle Toglia

There are so many arguments for and against breastfeeding. And the controversy surrounding it (and doing it in public) is constantly in the news, whether it’s Facebook figuring out its stance on the topic or a celebrity mom posting a special, proud moment with her child on Instagram.

There are also a lot of myths out there circling the act. There’s no doubt a great bonding experience that you can share with your baby but what about the bizarre stuff that no one ever tells you?

Well luckily, we gathered some of the stranger facts about breastfeeding that will definitely amaze you.

1. The Taste Of Breast Milk Is Never Boring

You would imagine that someone would get tired of having the same thing to drink morning, noon, and night but according to Women’s Health, your breast milk can taste different according to what you eat. This is a great way for nature to help prepare your baby to get used to the taste of solid foods.

2. Your Breasts Provide “Liquid Gold” For The First Few Days.

After giving birth, your breasts provide yellowish liquid also known as colostrum, or liquid gold. According to Women’s Health, it’s packed with so many nutrients like calcium, potassium, proteins, minerals and antibodies. It’s also filling.

3. Breast Milk Has Healing Power.

You might have heard this before but were skeptical about the truthfulness of this statement, but it’s the real deal. According to Pregnancy Info, breast milk can heal minor injuries like conjunctivitis or “Pink eye,” ear infections, scratches, cuts and sore nipples. Who knew?That will save you a visit to the first aid aisle for quite some time.

Read more on YourTango.com.

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