Dealing With The Truth About Yourself And The Hypocrisy Of Others

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May 7, 2014 ‐ By Kendra Koger
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Does it ever seem like the people who have no business giving advice are the first ones to give it to you?

I’ve seen thieves talk about the importance of honesty while spending someone else’s money.  I’ve seen abusers who beat their spouses give people marital advice, and I’ve seen pack rats try to make people justify buying a new pair of shoes (don’t you have enough?!) while their cars, houses, offices are filled to the brim of things that make an episode of “Hoarders” both sad and entertaining.

It’s just like the panhandlers who I’ve come in contact with while riding public transportation.  There was a guy selling green cloths, and he was claiming that if you bought one then they would bring you riches.  A guy on the train expressed:  “You have those rags and they’re not working for you, so why you trying to sell them to me?!”

The confusing thing about the situation is that when these people are giving their advice, you can’t help but to the see the disparities in their own lives.  Thoughts of “why don’t you take your own advice” might come into mind, and you might reject them.  Even if it’s great advice, if the person’s life doesn’t seem to match up to their counsel, we’re quick to dismiss them as not knowing what they’re talking about.

Many of us would like to see ourselves as great people.  That truth becomes even more evident if you’re privy to a disagreement between two people and they each tell their side.  Usually, their side will have them playing a more passive role, and the person that they’re arguing with as the main aggressor.

If these situations don’t prove anything else, it illustrates how people see themselves.  They view themselves as patient, wise, and above petty things.  Very rarely are people as frank about themselves as they should.

During these days of “being real” very few people are honest with themselves.  We tend to see ourselves through rose colored glasses.  We never see our problems are as dire as they can be, because we see ourselves as fully capable, functioning human beings.  We think of ourselves as above the measure, why do you think so many people smoke when we know all of the information that proves that it can damage our health?  It proves why many fast food restaurants are still billion dollar corporations, even though heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes are as rampant today.  In a way we think that we’re untouchable, or we think that we’ll have everything figured out before we reap the negative benefits of our poor decisions.

So within that, when we see people going down a similar path, we, in our great wisdom, will give them the tools that we plan to use in the future to straighten up our own lives.  We know the correct path, even if we’re not on it yet.

Once you see these issues, it just really illuminates just how we’re all the same boat.  We’re all people living, learning, and wanting the best out of life.  If we see someone who might be about to go down a path that we’re on, we’ll try to stop them, even if our lives aren’t completely in the shape we want it in  With that being said, maybe we should start cutting people a little slack when they give great advice though still living faulty lives.  Just because they haven’t made it doesn’t mean that their advice is any less valuable.

To be frank, there are times that you should consider the source before taking their advice, but just remember the next time you give advice that you might not have everything together as well.  A person’s life doesn’t negate the positive message that they’re trying to give you, honestly.

Kendra Koger might not have it all together, but she does have a twitter account @kkoger.

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