Is Lupita Nyong’o A Fetish?

March 4, 2014  |  

Brian To/WENN.com

Everyone is talking about Lupita Nyong’o. And I mean, everyone.

And why shouldn’t they? Nyong’o is not only beautiful, smart and can wear any got-damn color in the rainbow and still look fantastic, she is also very accomplished. Her most recent achievement: winning an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her powerful portrayal of Patsey in the also Oscar winning film 12 Years a Slave. It would make sense that all attention would be on Hollywood’s newest “It” girl.

However not everyone has been comfortable with some of the attention. As noted recently by mononymous writer Charish in the piece, The Fetishization of Lupita Nyong’o:

I‘m also weirded out by the onslaught of white people who are just plain gob-smacked by her exquisiteness. I’ve received an enormous amount of trending Facebook articles from various fashion sources that seem almost amazed by how beautiful Lupita is. It irks me that people don’t find it ironic how Nyong’o has preformed one of the most gut-wrenching representations of an enslaved black woman. Her character, Patsey, shows the reality of an enslaved body; this body is allowed to be ogled, worked to death, beaten, and raped. This body does not belong to Patsey and for some reason, it feels as though Nyong’o’s body doesn’t belong to her either.”

This objectifying of N’yong’o has not been lost on me (and based on the rumblings on my timeline, it has not been lost on others as well) and I think the above paragraph is a perfect articulation as just how icky some of this “admiration” has felt. But is it all bad?

As noted in the essay Suddenly, Being Africa Is Cool, writer Melinda Ozongwu believes that the sudden interest in Nyong’o, among other African A-listers Idris Elba and Chiwetel Ejiofor, has created  opportunities to challenge some long-held and believed stereotypes and perceptions:

 “I had a conversation with a friend who was uncomfortable with the media’s fixation with Lupita. She felt Lupita was being ogled for her ‘exoticness’ and that she was willingly allowing herself to be Hollywood’s dark-skinned mannequin. That the attention was in reality some sort of obsession masking America’s discomfort with race, and an overcompensation for what Lupita symbolised with her role in 12 Years A Slave. I say, let them be obsessed, so that an image that is so familiar to us becomes less unfamiliar to them. Let them learn to pronounce our names and enjoy our beauty. And let us enjoy the celebration because they came late to the party. They are just confirming what we’ve known all along – we’re pretty damn cool.”

Real Colored Girls Christa Bell and Mako Fitts Ward echoed similar sentiments about Nyongo’s role in challenging perceptions in the piece: Pretty Hurts: How Lupita Nyong’o is Healing the Beauty Game. However they focused on her effect on crafting a new set of beauty standards to counter what they have called an “conceptual erasure” of darker skinned black women in the media. More specifically:

One way to heal the fissures created by a global white supremacist beauty mandate is, of course, to increase portrayals of gorgeous, dark-skinned Black women in the representational sphere. We have to come up with creative strategies to heal our trauma around beauty and to create new versions of ourselves to celebrate and love. In the same way that Sweden has, for example, implemented a new rating system that considers the portrayal of women or that writer Inga Muscio documents the prevalence of rape culture in film, we must figure out ways to ensure that we aren’t triggered by images of us as abysmal creatures from the white imaginary.”

And Enuma Okoro, who in the piece What Actor Lupita Nyong’o Can Teach Us About Beauty, sees N’yongo’s importance as a way to help tear at racial categories and colorism in general, writing:

Understanding a little of this history of racial categorization can help place the issue of colorism in some much-needed context. It is easy to see why a woman like Lupita shining in the public eye is a sight for sore eyes. It is refreshing to have the world recognize her physical beauty as a woman, period. But, what I find admirable and even more fascinating about Lupita Nyong’o, besides her stunning good looks and her amazing fashion sense, is her own work to highlight another group of people who have been historically ill-treated for actually not having enough color at all. While the world rightfully celebrates Lupita Nyong’o in all her dark-skinned beauty, she herself has tried to educate the world about the condition of people with the rare genetic disorder of albinism in Kenya, her home.”

Not to mention that Nyong’o has seemed to even embrace her role as transformative figure. Recently at the Essence’s 7th annual Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon she took to the podium and gave a passionate speech about receiving a letter from a girl, who was considering skin bleaching. Speaking of her own struggles to accept a skin tone, which was so contrary to what was deemed beautiful by the world’s media, Nyong’o said:

And so I hope that my presence on your screens and in the magazines may lead you, young girl, on a similar journey. That you will feel the validation of your external beauty but also get to the deeper business of being beautiful inside. There is no shade to that beauty.”

In a sense, Nyong’o is almost like President Obama, who is coincidentally half-Kenyan. While not the first black, African or dark-skinned woman to win an Oscar – or even thought of as beautiful – she does embody a comfortable symbol of hope and change against deeply-entrenched beliefs held by our society, race and global culture, just as our current sitting president. Whether or not her impact will be a strong enough blow against the current status quo is yet to be seen. And if the President’s uphill and constant capitulation is any indication, this transformation of the larger society’s opinion of our (black, African, dark skin) beauty and worth is very doubtful. And I hope one day, we stop looking towards the larger corporatized and racist culture for our own validation.

However, after personally playing witness to black folks openly and in some cases proudly, speaking about their shame over their skin tones (or the dark skin tones of others), it is clear that many of us haven’t done a good job of reaffirming our own beauty. So maybe having a visual role model to the diversity of our beauty is exactly what we need. And I don’t think there is anything wrong with acknowledging that much.

 

Trending on MadameNoire

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  • SLIM

    Everytime they mention Lupita Nyongo they speak of her Ethnicity yep Shes African
    .For me its not uncommon to see a pretty or ugly Black woman. Shes not the most beatiful but she aint ugly eyes.Just a good actress and a terrible dresser .Rember thats my opinion on her .

  • Lynae

    It would be nonsensical to discount the meaning and role of dark female bodies within white supremacy when analyzing white hollywood or hollywood’s infatuation with Lupita Nyong’o. In hollywood Black women are measured on two extremes, light like Beyoncé or dark like Lupita. Think about why there are no in between Black women represented and esteemed on the same level as these two women. Their light and dark bodies are surrounded with exoticness. For a lot of these famous white people, especially the white fashion magazine editors and designers, Lupita embodies their idea of the Black woman- from Africa and dark with little hair. These white people are not “embracing her beauty”, they are exploiting it. In calling out this white gaze, no one is denying the magnificence of Lupita, but rather challenging the white supremacist capitalist patriarchal objectification she has been subject to. I’m beyond exhausted with the Black women who continue to comment how great it is that hollywood is finally presenting a dark skin woman. 1. Why is there such happiness to be found in white people saying Lupita is pretty? If we practiced cultural love, we would not look towards white supremacy for physical validation. 2. Not all representation is good representation.

  • Lynae

    It would be nonsensical to discount the meaning and role of dark female bodies within white supremacy when analyzing white hollywood or hollywood’s infatuation with Lupita Nyong’o. In hollywood Black women are measured on two extremes, light like Beyoncé or dark like Lupita. Think about why there are no in between Black women represented and esteemed on the same level as these two women. Their light and dark bodies are surrounded with exoticness. For a lot of these famous white people, especially the white fashion magazine editors and designers, Lupita embodies their idea of the Black woman- from Africa and dark with little hair. These white people are not “embracing her beauty”, they are exploiting it. In calling out this white gaze, no one is denying the magnificence of Lupita, but rather challenging the white supremacist capitalist patriarchal objectification she has been subject to. I’m beyond exhausted with the Black women who continue to comment how great it is that hollywood is finally presenting a dark skin woman. 1. Why is there such happiness to be found in white people saying Lupita is pretty? If we practiced cultural love, we would not look towards white supremacy for physical validation. 2. Not all representation is good representation.

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  • Fig

    Why are we so crazy? Only Black people want to take a good thing and run it down. She’s Hollywood’s New It girl, and she is a REFRESHING change from all the white women we see all the time. Is that bad? She’s charming, beautiful, intelligent, talented and she had the good sense to use the fact that she looks GREAT in high-fashion clothing to get her attention.

    Kerry Washington did the same thing. She said in an interview that she noticed that the women who were getting the kind of roles she wanted to get was because of the way they were dressed when they showed up. Kerry stepped up her game and BOOM got on Scandal. Really, had you ever paid her much attention prior to that? It’s a business and game based on visibility, and like Kerry, Lupita played the game and won! She was SMART and used her unique looks to her benefit. Now we get to see she’s intelligent as well as beautiful.

    And yes, we need to accept that she is SLIM and fit. What’s wrong with that? Too many of us African-American women are overweight or obese; not curvy, OBESE. Curvy is a shape, fat rolls are not a shape…

    And I am a so-called light, bright African-American woman with long hair and I think Ms.
    Nyong’oNyong’o is FANTASTIC, I’m going to see every movie she is in! Another African-American actress to support–the more the merrier!

  • smh

    Yes she is. American women who look just like her are ignored by both blacks and whites.

  • Suchalady

    You sound ridiculous.

  • pammy

    Lupita is fresh, she’s feminine, she’s well-learned, she’s beautiful inside/outside. What’s not to like? I am sick of this “fetish” business. Why does that word only come up when the woman is dark skinned? I don’t hear fetishizing in regards to Beyoncé, Mariah, or any other light bright almost half white woman. We need to do better. I think people are in awe that an original black woman has embraced her God given self and refuses to bleach or wear a weave. God bless Lupita!

    • Janelle

      This is part of the problem. Let’s not be ridiculous.
      A lot of women have embraced their God given self and don’t bleach or wear weaves. People need to stop acting like Lupita is the first dark skinned black woman to ever do that. Alek Wek, Grace Jones and Danai Gurira are just a few examples. Lupita is beautiful, but let’s not act like she is the first black woman to have ever had this look. Many came before her.

      • pammy

        Umm..who is acting that way? I give props where props are due. Since the black community is so freaking colorist, it is good to see black women embraced for them and not who others want them to be. Is there a problem with that??? OAN, yes the women you named have done it and I am grateful. Celebrating Lupita doesn’t take anything away from them.

      • Princess

        Ummm, who said she was the first?

  • CarlaKah

    So ?

  • Princess

    Because they find her beautiful, it’s an objectification and a fetish? Wow. There is something very wrong with that assessment. Can’t a black woman just simply be celebrated for her beauty? Lupita is someone who appeals to everyone. She has mass appeal. Her appeal is across the board and that’s a wonderful thing. If people feel that Lupita is being ogled because of her exoticness, then I think that speaks more to their own character than to anyone who just thinks the girl is beautiful. Lupita is beautiful inside and out and the world loves her. Let her be great. Not everybody has an ulterior motive for deeming someone beautiful. Not everyone has to filter something through an historical context first before they think someone is beautiful. Beautiful is beautiful and real, true beauty transcends all cultures. Lupita has “IT”.

  • Just saying!!

    Anony’s comment seems to be the most pertinent on this thread… Because I think he or she is one of the only people that understand what this damn discussion is about because this is not a personal attack on Lupita. I’m on my phone so I’m not writing a paragraph. But I will copy and past Anony’s comment which says “I think fetishism was a poor word choice on MN’s part. It seems as though the article agrees that Lupita’s praise is absolutely deserved but white hollywood maybe overcompensating to show us they are colorblind and we can no longer make claims that hollywood is whitewashed. And the latter was only suggested by one of the many sources that were quoted. The other quotes were all glowing praise of Lupita.” I don’t think a lot of people saw this comment because it was a reply to someone else’s. So I wanted to make sure it’s seen so many people have a better sense of what MN was trying to get at.

  • Just saying!!

    Reading these comments makes me believe that no one really read the article that this one is based off of huh? Read about the fetishization of Lupita which is linked above, it may help you contribute something productive to the discussion. Lol smdh

  • third ward trill

    Sorry, but I don’t see the “fetishism” that this article is purporting. As far as I know, Lupita has been treated with dignity by the media (shocking even to me and I wonder how long that’ll last but I digress). Her appearance hasn’t been dissected to the point of dehumanizing her, she hasn’t been suggested to conform to beauty norms and the acknowledgment of her good looks haven’t taken precedence over the reason she is famous in her first place — her talent. I’m curious to know how people celebrating her within appropriate limits is “fetishism”. Maybe the people who are saying this are merely projecting their own internalized prejudice because they see a dark skinned Black woman being praised for all the right reasons, and to them it automatically reads as “fetishism” because there is no possible way that a woman who would normally be considered ugly and undesirable is actually being admired instead of ignored. Y’all just can’t let a sister get some shine for once, SMH.

  • hi-liter

    She is being gushed about because she is not the typical wig/weave wearing half black, light skin, black women we see on tv and in movies day in and day out. She is representing what natural black beauty is without all the extra hair and skin bleaching agents. She is nothing like that self hating, Hawiian silky weave wearing Dencia. That woman is dayum near invisible at this point.

    • pammy

      Thank you!!

  • Truthteller

    Yes she is a fetish for white Hollywood. It’s a way for Hollywood to say “See! We aren’t racist!” There are tons of dark skin black women who are absolutely stunning, gorgeous and talented. Lupita is average.

    My other question, why are people saying she was best dressed at The Oscars? The dress was beautiful if it was on someone else. Her chest area looked horrible! Why did her stylist let her go out like that? The top part hung off of her because she had nothing to hold it up. If any other actress had worn that and had their chest looking like a male body builder, it would have been pointed out. Her hair was atrocious with that silly band and muff on the top. I have seen her do her hair so much better at other events, again the stylist should be ashamed.

    I cheered when she won The Oscar, but the hype before and after about her is very much exaggerated. No fan of Lupita can sit there and tell me that dress looked good on her. She looked boyish in that dress and her stylist should have worked to compliment her body type.

    • Allie

      God forbid little black girls have a beautiful, talented woman with a lovely personality to look up to. Oh no, we can’t have black girls having too much self esteem. Especially dark girls because little light skin girls grow up to be itches and we must keep that system. Shut up you dumb animal.

      • pammy

        Come on Allie!!

    • Sammi

      LOL! I was very happy for Lupita and I love her, but everyone I was watching the awards with was laughing at her chest. It did look really awful. I’m a fan, but I’m not blind. I disagree that she is average though, but I agree that there are a lot of beautiful dark skinned women.

  • enlightenment

    MadameNoire…you HAD to go there didn’t you? A fetish? Every year there’s an IT girl. Some time ago it was Jennifer Lawrence, before that it was Jennifer Lopez, even before it was Scarlett Johannson. They weren’t seen as a “fetish”…just the IT girl of that time.

    Lupita Nyong’o is on fire right now. Why? Cause she’s beautiful AND doing her thang…just like the other IT girls. She’s an intriguing success story, an incredible actress, and she’s highly intelligent — she can also speak Kenya’s own native language, English, AND Spanish. And like all IT girls, the media obsesses over them….It ain’t about no damn fetish. Gtfo.

  • Nehes Ba’a Rayay

    KENYA’S FINEST IS THE NEW “FETISH”!!!

  • guest

    Is Lupita the first beautiful and elegant dark skinned black woman the worls has ever seen? I think many whites have turned her into a fetish and many dark skinned black women are using her for personsl validation.

    • Suchalady

      She’s not the first but she is the first to get this level of attention.

  • Sunf1ower_Jones

    If there is anyone in the public eye that is a fetish, it’s the Queen Bee herself. How many are questioning THAT?

  • KeepingItReal

    She’s not a fetish. Entertainers have times when they are “hot” and times when they are “not”. She’s hot…and that’s a great thing.

  • guest

    When Blacks stop questioning Hollywood it is the beginning of the end. They don’t do anything out of the ‘goodness’ of their hearts. Grace Jones looks a lot like Lupita haven’t heard from her in years. That raises the question of where does she go from here stardom or does she fade.

  • Tia

    When the media was obsessed w: J.Law, Sandra Bullock, Julia Roberts, was it described as fetish? No it wasn’t so why is Lupita’s fame described as a fetish. She is a great actress and has great fashion sense, she was in the most critically acclaimed film of the year. Why are we as black people trying to bring her down, she is a classy, intelligent woman that is it.

    • Ravita

      Except J. Law, Sandra Bullock and Julia Roberts are A list actresses who continued to have brilliant careers after the “it” status was over. Lupita is just starting out so you can’t compare her to them. We’ll see how she does in the next year or two if she is as wonderful as everyone says she is. Time will tell.

      • pammy

        But they had to start somewhere. Jennifer wasn’t on the Hollywood scene long before she got her “praise”.

  • Another Reach

    To assume Hollywood’s love of Lupita is fetishism is dismissive of who and what she is. It implies that she isn’t quite deserving of all the attention or that there must be an ulterior motive. I see nothing odd about all of the praise and attention. And it’s not uncommon for new young actresses to burst onto the scene and get this treatment. Why is it questioned THIS time?

    • B Cooper

      Didn’t the young lady that portrayed Precious grab a lot of attention during/after the Oscar season? Like Gabby, it could be just because they did their thing(s)!

    • Anony

      hi another reach. i think fetishism was a poor word choice on MN’s part. It seems as though the article agrees that Lupita’s praise is absolutely deserved but white hollywood maybe overcompensating to show us they are colorblind and we can no longer make claims that hollywood is whitewashed. And the latter was only suggested by one of the many sources that were quoted. The other quotes were all glowing praise of Lupita.

      • Just saying!!

        Someone who finally gets what this whole damn discussion is about. THANK YOU!!

    • Von

      Most of us already knew this was going to be the topic, especially after her winning the Academy Award.

      The truth is, many of us don’t need Lupita to validate us, but it sure does feel good to see her getting the attention.

      White people follow everything we do and it was the women of the ‘natural hair’ community who propelled Lupita to the forefront in the first place. When we talk, they listen and go from there.

      It is our responsibility to promote the ‘Lupita’s’ of the world that everyone else ignores, especially when the so-called black media doesn’t. If you have the platform to do so, do it and don’t wait on the white media to do what we can do for ourselves.

  • Another Reach

    Hollywood always has “It” girls, “America’s Sweetheart”, etc. Why can’t we just accept all the fawning as just that? Did anyone wonder if Beyonce and Halle were being fetishized? Perhaps they simply see her as she is: a beautiful, intelligent, sweet and talented young lady who delivered a hell of a performance. I find little of the attention has to do with her looks and more so just HER as a person. It’s great to see good things happen to good people, and she genuinely seems like a good person. Who wouldn’t be taken in?

    • pammy

      100% agree

  • Light skin Tremaine

    She’s getting the same amount of attention as Halle, Angelina, Charlize or any other beautiful actress has got, infact the attention she’s getting for her looks is nowhere near what Halle got in her prime. The only person trying to fetishize her is the writer of this article. She is a beautiful woman period

  • Stephanie

    As black women, period … I think we are damned if we do, damned if we don’t. It shouldn’t be a debate; she’s a good actress (that’s her job), but more importantly, (off-screen) she’s a beautiful, smart woman, who carries herself with class, grace & self-respect. I think ALL people should admire that.

    • Blossom25

      You have hit the nail on the head. The person of her is really charming. She exudes confidence and I think that’s why many, including myself are taken with her.. Some of these comments make me so sad, though. As a black woman I think we need to celebrate achievements whatever shade of black we are. No need for the hostility.

  • Me

    Dang, black women just cannot win, hunh?

    • Suchalady

      I agree, it’s always something.

  • Kaia

    ‘ll be honest, I don’t see what the obsession is. The only thing I’ve
    been reading about how people are gushing over skin tone and afro. In
    the past, black people have been very critical over Denzel’s win as a
    crooked cop, Halle’s role in Monster’s Ball with Billy Bob Thornton and
    Octavia Spencer’s win for playing a maid.

    • Kaia

      But she’s praised for playing a s1@ve to an abusive s1@ve master??!! I don’t get it.
      I
      understand that she’s a graduate from Yale and that’s an
      accomplishment. But I can’t help to think all this adoration is because
      she’s a flat chest, dark skin woman that rocks an Afro/fade.

      • Guest

        And because she’s a pretty good actress and doesn’t seem to have a stuck up attitude like the typical light skinned African American “female”. I will never call a light bright female a woman.

        • Trisha_B

          “. I will never call a light bright female a woman…”

          Such an ignorant statement. So b/c someone is of a different shade they can’t be called a woman? The dumbest thing I’ve ever heard lmao. Being that black people are diverse, what if you have a daughter that was light skin, are you gonna treat her less b/c of her skin tone? Your doing exactly what others do to dark skin people smh

        • third ward trill

          You’re racist and misogynistic. Go play in traffic.

          • Guest

            I’m a black actually but nice try. Also a black woman. I am simply tired of seeing light skinned women project their butt hurt feelings of insecurity onto darker black women who want to finally find some comfort and happiness in their skin. And “Go play in traffic?” Isn’t that so 2008? Please.

            • third ward trill

              I don’t care what color you are, anyone who says a woman doesn’t deserve the dignity of being properly referred to as a woman simply because of the color of her skin is racist and misogynistic. You don’t get a pass for your comment just because you’re a black woman. And a black woman should understand more than anyone else what it’s like to be dehumanized, so you of all people should know better. Shame on you.

            • Just saying!!

              I’m confused by that? Light skinned women are anything but butt hurt. If anything they think they are the bees knees because of their relativity to whiteness. I’ve known darker skinned women to be butt hurt and try to project their insecurities onto other people, simply because they are taught that they are unworthy. Please think before you type.

      • Sunf1ower_Jones

        Kaia, are you a troll. Are you upset because people are praising her or do you like to see your comments in lights. She’s praised for many reason, one being she’s classy, smart, and YES, a beautiful dark-skinned woman. Now, what’s your problem? Not enough praise given to light brights? Get over yourself.

        • pammy

          Get it in Sunflower!!. I am so shocked to see all this shade thrown Lupita’s way. I guess certain people only feel light skinned women should be “glorified”. Black people need help….

        • Suchalady

          Thank you! She sounds jealous.

    • Ash1908

      I’m honestly baffled by this as well. I mean, they slandered poor Halle for her role! And yes, Denzel should have won for Malcolm X and Glory! But I think they won because they took roles that weren’t the norm ( good guy/girl).

      I do believe it’s more of dark skin and afro. I doubt if she was light skin, folks would be gushing. Just my two cents

      • Sunf1ower_Jones

        Isn’t there enough gushing for light-skins to go around. In fact, they get gushed on all the time. Is anyone complaining about that?

        • Chanda

          You’re right. Can’t we all, light-skinned and dark-skinned, get some play? Damn!

    • Guest

      You light skins need to just die already.

      • Ash1908

        Seriously, you need help!

      • NYLA

        Someone sounds beyond JEALOUS & ENVIOUS of LIGHT SKINNED women! Wow. Bad childhood/high school experiences, dear!? It caught up to you in your “adult” life, huh?! How sad, yet hilarious at the same damn time. Perhaps this c u n t s MAN left her/it for one of us! Sorry not sorry that we’re pretty and preferred…then, now, always. Take care and stay out of that sun! Lmfao 😉

        • cb

          now that was effing harsh!

        • WackComeBack4.0

          Lol dark skinned women smell like cocoa butter. Light skinned women smell like fish. Lol

      • cb

        now,now

    • Trisha_B

      I gotta agree (& yes I’m a brown skin girl since people wanna assume those who are questioning are light skinned smh)

  • Monae

    I think dark skin woman are trying to make Lupita the unofficial spokeswoman for all dark skin women. That’s what I’m getting from all this gushing over this child.

    • Guest

      You must be an ugly, worn out light skinned garden tool.

      • Leila

        SMH.. was that really necessary?

        • Guest

          Wow, that was fast! And yes. Lol

          • KIR12

            Hopefully, now the only thing we have to do it get these dark women weight down under 145 pounds. lol Trust be Gabourney big and black will never be in popular

            • pammy

              Umm, there are women of all hues that are overweight! Any reason you want to zone in on the dark skinned ones??

            • Georgia Devinshire

              so….light skinned women are not overweight?…….LOL!

        • Sunf1ower_Jones

          Don’t start none, won’t be none.

      • currvalicious

        Yes, I think you’re right. She is.

      • Chanda

        It’s the last sentence that did her in. Lupita is hardly a child.

      • cb

        dang!

    • Me

      You are stupid.

    • Sunf1ower_Jones

      I think you are a nimrod. Jealousy is not a good look, troll.

      That’s better than having Beyonce be the spokesperson for all light-skinned women.

  • Kaia

    Why is MN moderating my comment, when there are no cuss words or vulgar language..smh

  • olddude

    Fetish ..NO! But she’s gonna put beautiful natural black woman back on the map for our young women to look up to. I certainly hope so , because the so called “role models ” of today ( ie: reality stars and awful entertainers) are dropping the ball all together.

    • KIR12

      Correction**** Beautiful black women who weigh less than 140 pounds.

    • sasha

      Let’s drop the word fetish. It’s brought up in discussions of non-white beauty to cheapen and de-legitimate the beauty of others.

  • clickthis

    Madenoire = Typical jealous women.

    • Truth0312

      Uhhh….naw. These are valid questions considering the history of Black women in Hollyweird.

    • Anony

      i’ve come to the conclusion that MN purposefully chooses controversial titles to draw attention to their articles. I totally get it. It can be hard to keep a blog afloat. That being said if you actually READ the article you would see that’s there’s lots of praise given to Lupita. I agree with Truth0312 there are valid points that are brought up.

      The Pres Obama comparison gave me something to think about. On another note, why are people so averse to discourse? Asking critical or thought provoking questions doesn’t equate to being jealous. If you disagree contribute an intelligent thought and explain your point of view.

    • Huh

      Actually, the article just summarizes different views on the attention she’s received, and it’s all positive. However, I love that they analyzed some of the different angles that can be surrounding the reaction Lupita has received…I notice that when women like Erukah Badu, lauren hill & India Arie came out they were celebrated like the second coming and lauded by white media. However the fawning never felt like a precursor to a permanent seat at the table, it was more like a momentary fascination that would never yield the same kind of acceptance someone like a Beyoncé would get. It’s a complicated, nuanced issue that requires a mind more educated than mine, I just know it’s there. I think Lupita’s image alone is a breath of fresh air from the gabby union/Beyoncé reign that started becoming the Black female spokesperson in mainstream media.