Drama, Theater Grads Find More Jobs Than Their Tech Counterparts

August 5, 2013  |  

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Drama and theater majors are commonly greeted with blank stares and told: “You can’t do anything with that in this economy.” Now, artsy students finally have ammo to shoot down these cynical claims. Recent college graduates with art degrees are finding more jobs than those with technology degrees, reports USA Today.

According to a new Georgetown University study, recent grads with a degree in information systems have an unemployment rate of nearly 15 percent while their theater-loving counterparts have a joblessness rate of only 6.4 percent.

New tech degree-holders do not become “computer scientists or programmers or people who understand the innards of computers,” Carnevale, director of Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce said. “They’re people who use computer information at their job,” like bank workers who sit at the customer service desk.

Undergrad technology programs do not provide sufficient instruction for recent college graduates and they’re just not ready for the real world; “[They] don’t teach students all the skills needed to succeed in the health care IT world, and many employers are unwilling to take a chance on an inexperienced job candidate,” added USA Today.

Sheri Stoltenberg, CEO of a health care consulting firm, said that most firms don’t want to invest time and money on new graduates. Understandably, most employers prefer candidates with practical experience in technology.

Conversely, jobs in the drama and theater field remain unaffected by the slumping economic climate. Because there are fewer college students who pursue artsy degrees, employment is easier to come by.

Although the joblessness rate is lower, the wages — of course — are very low. Drama majors must settle for a starting salary of $25,000. College graduates with a technology degree hit the jackpot with a starting salary of $40,000.

This study collected 2010 and 2011 data from the U.S. Census Beaurau’s American Community survey on college graduates between 22 and 26 years old with a bachelor’s degree.

 

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