Keisha, La Toya, And Other Names You Automatically Know Belong To A Black Woman

July 2, 2013  |  
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Y’all know we can get creative when it comes to names, so know need to get uptight about this. Yesterday we went through the names that are inherently black and male. Now it’s time to look at the monikers you know belong to black women off the bat.

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Mercedes

Mercedes may have a Spanish origin, but unless you’re around people of that heritage, when you hear someone talk about their girl Mercedes, you can be about 99.9% sure that woman is black.

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The countries and Continents: India/Asia/Chyna/Kenya

Every one of you reading this probably has a cousin, sister, auntie, or friend named after one of these places. We love the names India, Asia, Chyna, and Kenya the way white people run to month names like April and June.

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Keisha

When Keyshia Cole pulled that “I’m not black, I’m biracial” move we should’ve told her, girl, look at your name! You’re black.

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Peaches

This nickname (hopefully) actually goes both ways because there are plenty of gay men going by the name Peaches as well. But the fact remains it’s always black.

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La Toya and any other name beginning with a “La”

We love to get fancy on ’em and switch up and otherwise simple name with the flair of a “La” in the beginning. LaShaunte, Lanay, Lanette. You get the picture.

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Porsha

Another remixed car name. Portia actually dates back to Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice and is Latin based, but this s-h-a version is all African American.

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Tiana/Teyanna/Tianna/Teonna

We love this name — and spelling it 36 different ways!

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Shameeka/ Shamika and her close cousin Tameika

Shameika, Tameika, Laneika, Tannicka, we like that “icka” sound and have come up with 100 different variants of it when naming our baby girls.

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Shanell/Channel

I can only assume this name lives on because of it’s connection to the luxury brand, because as an (African) American name, all it means is “pipe.”

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Diamond and Dominque

Babies are precious and plenty of black mothers have let the world know just how precious their little girls are by naming them Diamond. And though Dominique is a unisex form of the French name Dominic, when you hear this name in America, you know the owner is black.

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Desiree and Destiny

We love those French names don’t we? Desiree means “the one desired,” which is hopefully the case when it comes to bearing a child. Similarly, Destiny also has an Old French origin but we’ve taken it and run with it, introducing countless different spellings into the vernacular.

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Imani

It makes sense so many black girls are named Imani. The name is Swahili and means “Faith.”

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Ebony

Likewise, Ebony quite literally means black so it would be more surprising to see a white woman with this moniker.

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Sharese

Hey Sharese girl! Yup, there goes that “Sha” sound again, and another French name which actually means “cherry.”

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Deja

You know the French phrase déjà vu? Yeah that’s where we got this from, although we typically switch up the spelling or add on something at the end to make a new name entirely, like dejanay for instance.

 

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Teiara

Or Tiara or Teiarra or any other spelling. We basically jacked the Spanish word “Tierra” meaning “earth” and started using it for our daughters in droves.

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Alexis

Couldn’t afford a car so she named her daughter Alexis? Kanye wasn’t necessarily talking about a black mother but we do seem to bestow this name upon our girls more than anyone else.

 

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