Your Guide To Slimming Carbohydrates — Trust Us, They’re Not All Bad

April 3, 2013  |  

 

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You probably tried cutting out carbs completely, and while you maybe dropped weight fast, you also likely felt so lethargic you couldn’t stick to your exercise routine! And you were probably a smidge moody too. So you want to incorporate the no-no category of food back into your diet, in a healthy way now? Here are 14 surprisingly slimming carbohydrates that should be a regular part of your diet.

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Medium Grain Brown Rice

A plain variety contains almost zero salt and loads of minerals and fiber, and is always a healthier alternative to nutrition-less white rice. Serving size: 1 cup, 218 calories, 4 g fiber, 5 g protein

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Quinoa

This South American grain boasts double the protein of brown rice, but not just any protein: this one has a complete set of essential amino acids, making it vital for tissue and muscle strength. Serving size: 1 cup, 222 calories, 5 g fiber, 8 g protein

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Rolled oats

Instant or old-fashioned will work. Oats reduce your chances of heart disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. And they digest slowly, keeping you full for hours. Serving size: 1 cup, 166 calories, 4 g fiber, 6 g protein

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Steel-cut oats

Since these oats are not rolled, your digestive enzymes have to work harder to digest them, making them stay in your gastrointestinal tract longer and keeping your blood sugar stable. Serving: 1 cup, 300 calories, 8 g fiber, 10 g protein

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Muesli

This Swiss fiber-and-protein mega mix is a great way to kick start your morning. The combination of rolled oats, dried fruit and nuts offer a variety of vitamins and minerals, plus long lasting energy. Serving size: 1 cup, 289 calories, 6 g fiber, 8 g protein

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Granola

Even though it’s almost impossible to find a granola not loaded with sugar today, it’s worth the search—a serving of the stuff has nearly your day’s fill of protein and fiber. Serving size: 1 cup, 597 calories, 11 g fiber, 18 g protein

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Barley

Barley has an amazing ability to regulate your blood sugar. In fact, researchers found that consuming the stuff for breakfast reduces blood sugar fluctuations by 44% throughout the rest of the day. Serving size: 1 cup, 193 calories, 6 g fiber, 4 g protein

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Kamut

What was once reserved for pharaohs is now a staple of any health food nut’s diet. Kamut is a tasty alternative to brown rice and is loaded with heart-healthy fats. Serving size: 1 cup, 251 calories, 7 g fiber, 11 g protein

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Teff

The perfect carb for those on a gluten-free diet, Teff is a teeny tiny seed from Ethiopia, bursting with protein. Serving size: 1 cup, 255 calories, 10 g fiber, 10 g protein

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Farro

Egyptian diets are rich in low fat carbs and Farro is just one  of them. With double the protein and fiber of brown rice, plus calcium and iron, Farro can be the base of a meal. Serving:1 cup, 200 calories, 8 g fiber, 8 g protein

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Buckwheat

Feel less guilty about your pancakes when you make them Buckwheat style. These chunky morsels deliver a punch of fiber and protein in just one ounce. Serving size: 1 oz, 96 calories, 3 g fiber, 4 g protein

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Millet

Another gluten-free option, this Asian grain contains nearly the same amount of protein as wheat, plus is rich in Vitamin B, calcium and iron. Serving size: 1 oz, 106 calories, 2 g fiber, 3 g protein

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Bulgur

You’ll find this nutty whole grain in many Middle Eastern dishes. With plenty of minerals, it’s a great alternative for couscous or rice. Serving size: 1 oz, 96 calories, 5 g fiber, 3 g protein

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Cornmeal (Whole grain, yellow)

When you want a little comfort food but are still trying to replace fatty carbs, cornmeal is a great base for pizza dough, or specialized polenta. Serving size: 1 oz, 101 calories, 2 g fiber, 2 g protein

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