“6 Kids 4 Wives. Acquitted For Murder…A True Role Model!” Wife Of Patriots Player Bashes Raven’s Player Ray Lewis After AFC Loss

January 22, 2013  |  

Hmm, tell ’em why you’re mad, girl.

If you’re a diehard football fan and care anything about the New England Patriots or the Baltimore Ravens, I’m sure you were probably really invested in the AFC Championship game against the two NFL titans on Sunday. We know that in the end, the Ravens, led by popular linebacker Ray Lewis, bested the Patriots and are headed to the Super Bowl. And while Patriots fans were probably heated about all that, nobody was more irate than a random woman named Anna Burns Welker, the wife of Patriots wide receiver Wes Welker. She took to her Facebook to show love to her husband’s team and their effort, but to throw an immense amount of shade at Lewis and his personal life. This of course has nothing to do with why her husband’s team couldn’t pull out a win, but in a moment of rage, it’s clear she couldn’t have cared less. The rant went a little something like this, according to the Daily Mail:

‘Proud of my husband and the PatsBy the way, if anyone is bored, please go to Ray Lewis’ Wikipedia page. 6 kids 4 wives. Acquitted for murder. Paid a family off. Yay! What a hall of fame player! A true role model!’

Ouch. What Welker, who was Miss Hooters 2005, is referring to is of course the murder charges Lewis was caught up with in 2000 after a brawl at a party in Atlanta that Lewis and friends attended. Two men lost their lives in that melee, which was between people in Lewis’ camp and another group of men, and the end result was Jacinth Baker and Richard Lollar being stabbed to death. Though reports claimed that Lewis was never seen with a knife (and because he was a first-time offender), he was able to get a plea deal where he testified against two friends who were charged with him. He received 12 months of probation, and a huge fine from the NFL ($250,000). Because it was ruled that they were defending themselves, the two men Lewis testified against were acquitted of their charges. From there, Lewis reached a settlement with the families of both Baker and Lollar, got his life together and had some stand out NFL seasons ever since, including getting Super Bowl MVP the year after the tragic brawl–so he’s tried to move forward.  Lewis hopes to retire from the NFL after his last hurrah this season, which will include one more chance to get a Super Bowl ring in February.
While Lewis never commented about Welker’s rant, someone must have spoken to her, because she deleted the post and went forward and apologized for her behavior, not only on Facebook (“‘I apologize to Ray Lewis and his family for my comments. In no way did I mean for them to be mean or hurtful. I’m embarrassed for being a sore loser. I wish Ray and the Ravens good luck. Lesson learned!’) but via a statement to Larry Brown Sports, according to CBS News.

“I’m deeply sorry for my recent post on Facebook. I let the competitiveness of the game and the comments people were making about a team I dearly love get the best of me. My actions were emotional and irrational and I sincerely apologize to Ray Lewis and anyone affected by my comment after yesterday’s game,” she continued. “It is such an accomplishment for any team to make it to the NFL playoffs, and the momentary frustration I felt should not overshadow the accomplishments of both of these amazing teams.”

Though I understand wanting to defend yourself and the team you care about from Internet trolls and haters, the ugliness towards one particular person who hadn’t said anything to you or about you definitely wasn’t necessary. Because no matter what she had to say, Welker and her husband will be at home watching Lewis play on Super Bowl Sunday. Now that’s the gotcha gotcha!

Image of Ray Lewis from WENN.com.

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