‘It Was Really Hard On Jamie And I’: Kerry Washington Admits Challenges Being Whipped And Called The N-Word While Filming ‘Django Unchained’

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December 17, 2012 ‐ By Jazmine Denise Rogers
Screen shot 2012-12-17 at 9.21.39 AM

Source: WENN

The lovely Kerry Washington recently visited The Tonight Show with Jay Leno where she discussed some of the challenges faced while filming her latest project, “Django Unchained, which stars the “Scandal” actress and Jamie Foxx,who plays her husband. The film tells the tale of a slave couple who is separated and sold to two different plantations and a husband’s desperate attempt to rescue his wife from the hands of an evil slave owner. The NAACP Image Award-nominated film is said to be extremely graphic at times and provides a true-to-life depiction of what life was really like for the slaves who actually had to live through this era. Kerry expressed that although she respects the authenticity of the movie, she faced some challenges while filming. Check out some of the highlights of her interview.

On the film’s brutal honesty:

“I think it was one of the things that really drew me to the film. I think in a lot of our films, there’s a romanticizing of slavery. If you look at “Gone With The Wind” it was the “good ole days of slavery” when everyone got along, which is not how it really went down.”

On
being called the N-word and other vulgar slurs in the film:

“It was really hard to do. I kept telling Quentin [Tarantino] that I was going to send him my extra therapy bills because it was really hard on Jamie and I both.  That actually made us feel extra grateful for anybody that was able to survive it because we barely survived it for pretend for the eight months we were filming.

On her “whipping” scene:

I did [get hit with a whip].  We were filming on a slave plantation so it was an archeology site that you knew that these awful crimes against humanity had actually happened. It was a stunt whip but the guys were very reluctant to do it but I thought we are here and we should honor the story that we’re telling and honor the people who lived through this horrible tragedy and try to be as real as possible.”

Kerry did make a great point, slavery has been romanticized by Hollywood on some levels. It was a dreadful era that should never be watered down. Given Tarantino’s real-life depiction, it sounds like it is going to be a great movie.

Check out video of Kerry’s interview on the next page. Will you be going to see “Django Unchained” when it is released later this month?

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  • Dichu eba realy lub mehSteebie

    This has nothing to do with self esteem issues. black slavery is our history and we shouldn’t Need reminding because we should never forget it. I applaud Mr. terintino for making this movie and not romanticizing it. Besides kids can probably learn more from this movie than the little bit they teach in school just so teachers can say they covered that area and mark it off the list.

  • Kenedy

    I hate everything Quinten Taratino does….and i mean everything…he makes a mockery of film making

  • Just saying!!

    Heck yeah I’m going to see it!! I’ve been waiting for it to come out!!

  • Meyaka

    My friend is taking her two sons and her daughter to see this movie. Youngings need to see this movie and realize how their ancestors went trough hell for them to have basic human rights,maybe they will start acting like they have some goddamn sens.

    • BrianK

      SMDH. Why doesn’t your friend take her kids to a musuem or read to them or even show them pictures of our people being lynched/burnt and whipped in this sinful country, rather than take them to see Tarrantino movie? How many jewish mothers took their kids to see Inglorious Basterds to teach them about the holocaust? Please tell your friend to reconsider.

      Regards

      A concerned black adult

      • Summer

        this

      • Meyaka

        She has and constantly do all of the above. And?

        • BrianK

          Well good for her, hopefully her kids already know what their ancestors went through then. This is a movie by a white director obsessed with violence and the n-word. Its purpose is to entertain not educate all but the least educated. Again do you think jews saw Inglorious Basterds as a way to learn about their history?

      • Dichu eba realy lub mehSteebie

        I’m sure its nothing like seeing it in action on a full screen. I’m sure they will probably find it more interesting at this age to watch a movie with all the gritty details and then maybe the children will be more encouraged to pick up a book about slavery them selves

  • xxdiscoxxheaven

    Okay real talk I might if had some kind of blackout/flashback kind if thing and started screaming. Sometimes they are a little to extra with these movies.

    • Just saying!!

      It’s not extra if it’s real.

  • SheBe

    Im glad that she was compassionate about it all. The use of the “N” word is rampant in films now and not to portray the image of slavery. Our community has allowed society to get comfortable with our oppression both past and present. We use it so it “makes it ok”. Kids are using it in schools and then there is some hierarchy mindset with its use. It’s disgusting how we are so consumed with hating each other that we practically ignore it when others do it against us. It’s not always the case but its happening so much more.

  • ieshapatterson

    I’m glad that she appreciates the era she lives in and gives her dues to the people who had to go threw that.i wish more people had her mind set.

  • IllyPhilly

    Tarantino seems to go out of his way to have his films full of N-words. I never got the art of it and don’t watch his films because of it. Isn’t Reginald Hudlin on this?

    • Dichu eba realy lub mehSteebie

      No different than any other non Tyler Perry/t.d. Jakes black director’s movie