‘My Dad Didn’t Love Me’: RHOA’s Marlo Hampton Airs Out Her Abuse Issues

12 comments
November 23, 2012 ‐ By Jazmine Denise Rogers

Source: WENN/Johnny Louis

Most of us were introduced to the fierce, fabulous and feisty Marlo Hampton during the last season of Real Housewives of Atlanta as Nene’s gal pal and common denominator in much of the drama that went down last season. If you recall, Marlo was often scrutinized by her fellow cast members, with the exception of Nene and Cynthia for being a label wh*re with a criminal past. While many assumed they knew all they needed to know about the seemingly shallow label lover, her latest interview with Hello Beautiful reveals that there’s much more to Ms. Hampton than meets the eye.

As she discussed her organization, Glam It Up, which is an empowerment program put in place to assist in the self-esteem and guidance of young girls who may be experiencing turmoil in their lives, Marlo provided some insight into what her own childhood was like, including having alcoholic mom and being in foster care, that may just slightly explain some of her erratic behavior on the show…maybe. Check out some of her story:

I grew up in a foster home. I started with my real mother of course but she was an alcoholic and on drugs and she was very abusive which is why I ended up leaving home. I ran away because she was abusive. Growing up, I didn’t get hugs and kisses from my mom, she wasn’t that type. Like the things that a mom would do with a little child, I didn’t get that from my mom. I had a little brother at the time and it was like I was his mother. I was super young. I left home at 11 so I was like nine or 10 years old taking care of my brother: taking him to day care, being his protector and making sure he was okay when my mom was out partying. I look back and it’s sad. I used to feel so bad growing up in a foster home with no mom or dad. I was so angry at the world for years but now as an adult I’ve come to accept it like, ‘You know what Marlo, everything that’s happened to you, good or bad, happened for a reason,’ and it made me stronger and the person that I am today.

She also went on to discuss how her past assists her in helping and interacting with the young girls she comes in contact with today.

Now, I can go and sit down with my Glam It Up! girls and let them know that, ‘Hey I was there! I had a mom that did drugs right in front of me and I had a mom that beat me, I was in four different foster homes but if I made it you definitively can too and you can even do better than me!’ It’s really tough. It’s hard as an adult into relationships. Like, the man and woman who were supposed to love me the most weren’t there. Like how do I know you’re going to love me? My dad didn’t love me. My dad left me. It’s just something you have to pray and overcome and realize that God has you and live on faith.

We certainly commend Marlo for being so candid about her past as well as the effort that she’s putting forth to reach back into the community and help those who may be in similar situations, but it’s still hard to see her in a new light after her behavior last season.

What do you think of Marlo opening up about her troubled childhood? Does it change your perception of her?

Jazmine Denise is a writer living in New York. Follow her on Twitter @jazminedenise

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  • http://twitter.com/macamerica83 Nya Jacobsen

    If she can afford all those shoes she can afford to go to therapy. I feel sorry for those kids she trying to help when she hasn’t helped herself. I give her credit for trying, but she should just make their lunches or something.

  • Guest

    She is giving advice to young girls? “If I made it you can make it too.” Ok first of all what are you known for? Second of all you’re an escort that fvcks for change. You are no Michelle Obama, hell you not even Beyonce.

  • scandalous7

    boo hoo Marlo we dont give a damn, everybody got issues.

  • hollyw

    Ummm I’m sorry…but this is completely unacceptable. It’s commendable for her to shed light on abuse and let her past be a beacon for young girls experiencing similar conditions, but for her to put herself up as an actual role model that is advocating herself as a sign of success rather than presenting herself for what she truly is: a “work in progress”, AT THE LEAST! is such a travesty for any girl who’s seen her glorified prostituted status on national television. If you ask me, this shenanigan is just a continuation of the admiration she was TRYING to get from her fellow castmates last season; except, this time, w/ impressionable children. I can’t!

  • http://www.facebook.com/thokozileX Thokozile Xaba

    She is still a kook.

  • http://mommaused2say.com/ Mommaused2say

    While I understand it we all know it is no excuse. At some point, you have to take ownership of your actions and once you hit adulthood, it’s a wrap! Your actions now fully belong to you!

  • It’sMe

    I know I’m going to sound horrible and cynical, but I’m not buying it. Now I do appreciate that she’s trying to give back to the community, but her timing in revealing these things seem like she’s trying to hitch on Kenya’s emotional wagon and remind people that she’s still out there. Why didn’t she share these things on the show? She had no qualms in yelling about her prison record, but she’s so open NOW about her family background?

    Now, I’m not saying that it didn’t happen, but I am extremely tired of people using their backgrounds as an excuse to act a fool. Whenever people find out about my jacked up childhood they always tell me how they’re so surprised at how nice and level headed I am and there are millions of other people with similar or worse stories. You’re not on the show anymore, Marlo, just fade into obscurity.

  • Space

    she made it by grace of god dont never judge a book by its cover!!!

  • Meyaka

    Girl her and Kenya needs to have a stadium full of seats,I’m tired of bishes acting a fool and blaming it on their childhood,DO BETTER!!!! We all have suffered trauma at one point in our lives,do we go around getting in people’s face,yelling and going crazy,seek therapy.

  • JaneDoe

    I commend her for turning her pain into something beneficial to help others. Marlo is a very sweet woman. Ppl should really reserve judgement and be mindful that behind a lot of the antics are usually a lot of pain.

  • DoinMe

    Its obvious that Marlo has some deep rooted issues. I hope that after watching herself on RHOA, she realizes that its time for her to grow up and really deal with her past instead of masking it in high-end fashion (although her wardrobe and fashion-sense is to die for!) and trickin with old men.

  • Miss_Understood

    This is sad but not a complete surprise, all anger comes from a place of hurt and people who lacked love and support as children struggle with finding a way to compensate as adults and Marlo seems to use material things to do so