‘Broke’: New Documentary Looks at How Pro Athletes (Foolishly) Lose All Their Money

April 20, 2012  |  

Source: tribeccafilm.com

This is a documentary I am dying to see because it’s going to explain an issue I just can’t wrap my head around—how pro athletes like Antoine Walker, Bob Whitfield, Terrel Owens, and hundreds more, squander all their (millions of dollars of) earnings.

Coming to the Tribeca film festival next week is a new feature-length doc from ESPN films that will shed some light on why, according to a 2009 Sports Illustrated article, 60 percent of NBA players and 78 percent of NFL players run out of funds within five years of retirement. Simply titled, “Broke,” the film is described as “an allegory for the financial woes haunting economies and individuals all over the world.”

“Sucked into bad investments, stalked by freeloaders, saddled with medical problems, and naturally prone to showing off, most pro athletes get shocked by harsh economic realities after years of living the high life. Drawing surprisingly vulnerable confessions from retired stars like Jamal Mashburn, Bernie Kosar, and Andre Rison, as well as Marvin Miller, the former executive director of the MLB Players Association, this fascinating documentary digs into the psychology of men whose competitive nature carries them to victory on the field and ruin off it.”

Director Billy Corben looks to “paint a complex picture of the many forces that drain athletes’ bank accounts, placing some of the blame on the culture at large while still holding these giants accountable for their own hubris.” If this documentary really exposes the reality of losing millions of dollars of  money that’s not guaranteed practically overnight, it should be required viewing for anyone signing a new contract. #BreakTheCycle.

See more info on “Broke” on the Tribeca Film Festival website. Would you check this out?

Brande Victorian is a blogger and culture writer in New York City. Follower her on Twitter at @be_vic.

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