Keeping it in House: Is Your Child Better Off Being Homeschooled?

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January 18, 2012 ‐ By Toya Sharee

 

If other inner-city school districts are anything like the one I witness several days out of the week, it’s understandable why many parents are opting out of the education system completely for an opportunity to educate their children a variety of curriculum in the safety of their own home.  More students are in the hallways than in the classroom nowadays (and that’s if they even bother coming to school at all).  Political power plays leave educators and supporting staff who are actually invested in students unmotivated, powerless and in the worst case, jobless.  Confusion and competition at the top of the education chain leads to a chaotic learning environment where students often fall at the losing end.

In my own childhood I had the chance to be both a student of a catholic school for 10 years (grades Pre-K to eight) and a high school student at a small magnet school in Philadelphia whose curriculum focused on college preparation and world relations.  I often take for granted the advantage that having a solid, well-rounded basic education gave me.  As a parent, you’d like to believe that everyday you’re sending your child to a place where for seven to eight hours a day they’re gaining the skills necessary to be critical thinkers and competitive players in the real world.  Unfortunately, with all of the stories of sexual assault and molestation, violence and bullying, I often wonder how much learning is actually being achieved.  We all know that children thrive on routine and structure, so I’m also troubled by the idea that many children who are already coming from unstable family situations can no longer find security and safety in the “typical school day.”

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  • http://www.womenaregamechangers.com/ WomenAreGamechangers

    As a former public school teacher and homeschool advocate, I think it truly depends on the family. I have friends who were homeschooled their whole life and now have really nice jobs and very sociable. Homeschooling has many different definitions but the main thing is they child must be able to learn how to think critically, be able to adapt to social situations and understand self-worth so that when the child leaves he/she will be fine.