Is Heat-Trained Hair for You?

10 comments
December 5, 2011 ‐ By Dolapo Roberts

Heat training is a process where you loosen your kinks with the gradual use of direct heat. In reality, it is heat-damaged hair because your hair will not revert or shrink up as it used to. The benefits of heat-trained hair include experiencing less single strand knots and tangles, and as a result, you will retain more length.

One of my fave YouTubers, Longhairdontcare2011, successfully heat-trains her tailbone length hair by blow-drying it—her once kinky texture is now more on the wavy side. She has been natural for eight years and uses her blow dryer once a month. As previously mentioned, it is a gradual process and not something you do overnight.

Check out her page to see videos of her journey, which include pictures of her hair before it was heat trained.

What’s your take on heat training? Is it something you would consider doing? Why or why not?

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  • http://www.thecoffeechef.com Keneesha Hodge Shorter

    This is not a good idea for someone who is not careful about doing their own hair.  Just as with relaxing if you don’t care for your hair properly, you’re still damaging it. I straightened my hair about 3-5 times last year and didn’t like what it did to my hair so I cut it all off and started growing my natural hair again.  My hair has thanked me for it by learning to do what I want it to, just as it did when I first went natural by growing longer than it ever had when I was relaxing.  I accept my natural hair more than ever now and  have learned to let go of all the hair hype.  

  • Zim

    And, your title does not do the topic justice. It probably
    should have been something like HOW TO
    GROW LONG AFRICAN HAIR, or something like that. I good title goes a long
    way in generating interest. I overlooked it the first time, but I accidentally
    stumbled upon it again tonight. Thanks again.

  • Zim

    Thank you, thank you, thank you!
    I can’t say it enough. You’ve done a public service by sharing this link.
    It is amazing to see a black girl grow full length natural hair! I did not think that was possible.
    And she’s very exact in her steps and very patient. She is clearly very intelligent. I just appreciate that she took the time to make all those videos (while she’s working on her college degree!) to give good clear and concise advise to black women on how she grew her hair. And she is not preachy. She just tells you what she’s done and let you know that you can try that or whatever works for you. Great advice.
    Thanks again, Dolapo Robertsf for sharing this with us. 

  • Msmykimoto2u

    Nappy, straight, braided, relaxed, conrowed, dreaded…..thats whats so beautiful about black people. We can rock our hair in almost any style and look fabulous. Our hair literally is art

  • http://twitter.com/_toinfinity DinecaSUNSHINE

    I’m perfectly content with my naps,kinks, etc. as they are. I love all fifty-leven of my curl patterns and textures. 

  • Brina

    I do this didn’t know there was a name for it. i’m natural and just get my hair pressed twice a month. i didn’t know it makes it permanent… my texture is still the same *shrugs*

  • Bee

    This was a stupid article…o_0

  • gmarie

    Why can’t people do what works for them with the hair growing from THEIR heads without ridicule?

  • Shakevaj

    It’s nothing wrong with braids,kinky hair,nappy hair,permed hair etc etc. Why are people so worried about what folks to with their hair?? Get a life. Me personally,me hair is permed and I go to the Dominicans.

  • L-Boogie

    Why can’t people just accept their hair?  Nappy, kinky, wavy, curly…it is all good. 

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