22 Days Of Doing Better: Day 2

January 3, 2018  |  

Trying to live your best life in 2018 — or at least a better one? We’re here to help with #DoBetter2018, a 22-day series of how-to articles to help you achieve some of the most common New Year’s resolutions and personal growth goals.

Proclaiming someone else’s mane as #HairGoals is common year-round, but if you’re truly committed to healthier hair in 2018 and reaching your own hair goals, you’re going to need a little advice from the experts. We reached out to Miami-based celebrity stylist Tatianna Des, Creator of hair company the Twelve01 Collection, and Eny Oh, Founder of beauty brand Beholder El, for tips on how to better maintain your mane — no matter how you wear it.

If Tatianna had to name one healthy hair habit for women to adopt in the new year it would be “Treat your crown.” As she put it, “It’s yours, so treat it with care. Tee tree drops, Shea Moisture Conditioning Treatments and clipping your ends are all great, simple methods to start your journey to healthy tresses.” She also recommends a daily intake of  Vitamins A, C, E, and Biotin for strengthening strands.

Eny shared her personal routine which has kept her hair healthy over the years. “I️ trim my ends every two-three months or whenever I feel they need some trimming. I️ co-wash my hair and only shampoo twice a month. I️ wear protective styles (weaves and wigs), and I️ don’t put heat to my hair even when I️ wear weaves.” Eny says although she usually wears frontal wigs and weaves, which protect the hairlines from damage, when sews in tracks she usually wears bundles from her brand’s Copacabana Curly line because the texture matches her natural curl pattern and therefore doesn’t put strain on the hair she leaves out.

Both stylists emphasize moisture is non-negotiable when it comes to taking care of your hair. Tatianna stresses you need to use conditioner “every time you wash or wet your hair.” As she explains, “Water makes hair dry and brittle. Always condition your hair and allow it to sit and then rinse with cold to lock in moisture.” Her favorite natural moisturizer is an aloe vera hair mask which she says is “amazing for the hair and also leaves a high glossy shine for your styling finish.” Plus aloe vera can be found in your local grocery store and costs next to nothing.

Eny agrees, saying she recommends water, water based gels, oils and weekly hair masks just keep your hair moisturized.

We’ve all been guilty of making a few mistakes when it comes to our hair and the biggest one Eny says she sees women make is not doing proper research before going natural. “I feel like the common misconception is that you can just wake up one day and think you can go natural and (HAHAHA) you can’t. I️t requires so much work, as well as maintenance.”

Before doing the chop or ceasing relaxers, Eny recommends women research their hair type and what products will work best for them. “Going natural is something I would recommend to anyone because I️t allows your hair to get back to its most natural state & it’s so healthy. I️t just takes work, research, and patience.”

If your edges and ends are a source of stress for you, Eny recommends “getting trims, staying away from heat tools and deep conditioning your hair every two weeks” to retain growth. As for products, she suggests Jamaican castor oil and Edge Entity Follicle Stimulant.

Tatianna recommends Wild Growth Hair Oil to keep hair moisturized while it’s in braids, a sew-in, or even ponytails because it’s non-greasy and has a nice scent. When it comes to repairing edges as a result of traction alopecia she suggests wearing weaves to give hair a break and “using growth oils with menthol to open up your pores basically scalp stimulating oil. In between hair styles let your real hair breath, and be free.”

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