10 Books By Famous Black Women You Should Read

November 3, 2017  |  
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Everyone talks about laying out on the beach with a good book during the summer but with fall upon us, it’s now time to curl up on the couch with a juicy novel, a cozy blanket and, perhaps, some wine.

If you’re reading Gabrielle Union’s debut memoir, you’re going to need quite a bit and when it comes to these other books by Black female celebrities we’re sure the same could be said. From stories of tragedy to tales of triumph and little books that deliver big laughs, here are 10 books by famous Black women you should definitely be reading right now.

Books Black WomenThe Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, Issa Rae

“Being an introvert (as well as “funny,” according to the Los Angeles Times) in a world that glorifies cool isn’t easy. But when Issa Rae, the creator of the Shorty Award-winning hit series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, is that introvert—whether she’s navigating love, the workplace, friendships, or “rapping”—it sure is entertaining. Now, in this New York Times bestselling debut collection written in her witty and self-deprecating voice, Rae covers everything from cybersexing in the early days of the Internet to deflecting unsolicited comments on weight gain, from navigating the perils of eating out alone and public displays of affection to learning to accept yourself—natural hair and all.”

Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand In the Sun and Be Your Own Person, Shonda Rhimes

“This poignant, intimate, and hilarious memoir explores Shonda’s life before her Year of Yes—from her nerdy, book-loving childhood to her devotion to creating television characters who reflected the world she saw around her. The book chronicles her life after her Year of Yes had begun—when Shonda forced herself out of the house and onto the stage; when she learned to explore, empower, applaud, and love her truest self. Yes.”

We’re Going to Need More Wine: Stories That Are Funny, Complicated, and True, Gabrielle Union

“In this moving collection of thought provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses that same fearlessness (used to speak out during A Birth of a Nation) to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards, and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents. Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic, and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness, and the power of sharing truth, laughter, and support.”

Chasing Grace: What the Quarter Mile Has Taught Me about God and Life, Sanya-Richards Ross

“Sanya shares triumphant as well as heartbreaking stories as she reveals her journey to becoming a world-class runner. From her childhood in Jamaica to Athens, Beijing and London Olympics, readers will find themselves inspired by the unique insights she’s gained through her victories and losses, including her devastating injury during the 2016 Olympic Trials forcing career retirement just weeks before Rio. Sanya demonstrates how even this devastating loss brought her closer to the ultimate goal of becoming all God created her to be.”

A Sick Life: TLC ‘n Me: Stories from On and Off the Stage, Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins

A Sick Life chronicles Tionne’s journey from a sickly young girl from Des Moines who was told she wouldn’t live to see 30 through her teen years in Atlanta, how she broke into the music scene, and became the superstar musician and sickle-cell disease advocate she is today. Through Tionne’s tough, funny, tell-it-like-it-is voice, she shares how she found the inner strength, grit, and determination to live her dream, despite her often unpredictable and debilitating health issues. She dives deep into never-before-told TLC stories, including accounts of her friendship with Lisa “Left-Eye” Lopes and her tragic death. Tionne’s unvarnished discussion of her remarkable life, disease, unending strength, and ability to power through the odds offers a story like no other.”

Around the Way Girl: A Memoir, Taraji P. Henson

“With a sensibility that recalls her beloved screen characters, including Katherine, the NASA mathematician, Yvette, Queenie, Shug, and the iconic Cookie from Empire, Taraji P. Henson writes of her family, the one she was born into and the one she created. She shares stories of her father, a Vietnam vet who was bowed but never broken by life’s challenges, and of her mother who survived violence both at home and on DC’s volatile streets. Here, too, she opens up about her experiences as a single mother, a journey some saw as a burden but which she saw as a gift.

“Around the Way Girl is also a classic actor’s memoir in which Taraji reflects on the world-class instruction she received at Howard University and how she chipped away, with one small role after another, at Hollywood’s resistance to give women, particularly women of color, meaty significant roles. With laugh-out-loud humor and candor, she shares the challenges and disappointments of the actor’s journey and shows us that behind the red carpet moments, she is ever authentic. She is at heart just a girl in pursuit of her dreams in this “inspiring account of overcoming adversity and a quest for self-discovery, written with vitality and enthusiasm.”

This Is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare, Gabourey Sidibe

“Sidibe’s memoir hits hard with self-knowing dispatches on friendship, depression, celebrity, haters, fashion, race, and weight (“If I could just get the world to see me the way I see myself,” she writes, “would my body still be a thing you walked away thinking about?”). Irreverent, hilarious, and untraditional, This Is Just My Face will resonate with anyone who has ever felt different, and with anyone who has ever felt inspired to make a dream come true.”

Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina, Misty Copeland

“With an insider’s passion, Misty opens a window into the life of an artist who lives life center stage, from behind the scenes at her first classes to her triumphant roles in some of the world’s most iconic ballets. A sensational memoir as “sensitive” and “clear-eyed” (The Washington Post) as her dancing, Life in Motionis a story of passion, identity and grace for anyone who has dared to dream of a different life.”

You Can’t Touch My Hair: And Other Things I Still Have to Explain, Phoebe Robinson

“Using her trademark wit alongside pop-culture references galore, Robinson explores everything from why Lisa Bonet is “Queen. Bae. Jesus,” to breaking down the terrible nature of casting calls, to giving her less-than-traditional advice to the future female president, and demanding that the NFL clean up its act, all told in the same conversational voice that launched her podcast, 2 Dope Queens, to the top spot on iTunes. As personal as it is political, You Can’t Touch My Hair examines our cultural climate and skewers our biases with humor and heart, announcing Robinson as a writer on the rise.


Let’s Talk About Pep, Sandy, “Pep,” Denton

“Filled with surprising insights, outrageous anecdotes, and celebrity cameos — including Queen Latifah, Martin Lawrence, Janice Dickinson, Omarosa, Missy Elliott, L.L. Cool J, supermodel Caprice, Ron Jeremy, Lisa “Left Eye” Lopez, “Spinderella,” and many others — Let’s Talk About Pep offers a fascinating glimpse behind the fame, family, failures, and successes of celebrity…and into the faithful heart of a woman who will always value the good friends she found along the way. In the words of Sandy “Pepa” Denton, “there’s no walking away from that.”

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